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We have never owned a dog from a puppy mill, but fell in love with Emma, a cross Schnauzer, Poodle, Terrier (I think). She was in foster care for two months and we brought her home yesterday morning. A very well behaved dog, but seems sad and depressed and not at all aggressive. I know I can't expect more as she is in new surroundings once again, but was wondering, she planted herself on my couch (don't mind) and never wants to leave until I practically force to take her walk. She has not gone potty in the house. Do I leave her on the couch during this adjustment period, or what?

Thanks for your help,
Signed, Emma's new mom
 

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Congrats on your rescue, puppy millers make me sick! :mad:

Most dogs that come from puppy mills never feel love, affection,
or even the touch of human hands. As a new dog, I'd just give
her time to get adjusted and keep working with her, change will
come over time. :)
 

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Congratulations on your new addition! Things will eventually work itself out.... :) no worries. It took our fostered/adopted, very shy and timid yorkie about a good two months to fully come out of his shell. She needs time to adjust to her new surroundings, and to know that you are her forever home. I would routinely take her out, even if you have to carry her outside to her spot, let her go, and after she is done reward her with a little treat. I think the sooner she adjusts to your routine the better.
 

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I think she deserves to be on the lounge. Poor sweety. Love to see pics of her. She is probably just comfortable and loving the fact of being loved for a change. Try and make a game of it. Call her name as you are playing with her. Let her jump of the lounge to play with you. If she still doesnt want to come off, and you want her to go to the toilet, say come. Use only one word, they dont know a sentence. Everytime she comes off the lounge, give her a treat. When she doesnt come willingly, do not give her a treat. You may have to put a lead and collar on to get her off if she is not responding, when she comes off then pet her. Good girl!!! It usually wont take long for them to learn, I think she is just finding herself atm.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Emma

Thanks everyone for your replies. Emma is doing really well considering it's only been not even 3 weeks. This dog went through a lot and didn't mention that the foster mom told me a group of the Emma and some other dogs escaped the puppy mill due to be shot because they were too old for breeding (she is 5). I cannot imagine anyone shooting this fantastic, loving dog. Wow, just makes me ill, but to these despicable, low lifes, this is just a business.

She has really taken to me, is at my side for the most part, and when they said she was housetrianed, they really meant it. All this dog wants is a nice home and lots of love. The only problem is, she doesn't much care for my husband, growls a bit when he enters the room, and if he sits down on one couch, she goes to the other. I think perhaps a male in her past mistreated her. We will just give it time.

We took her to relatives for Christmas, and this little gal was the absolute favorite. There were a few other dogs yapping, but Emma just sat or laid quietly. Her and I struck it rich with each other. :)
 

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You have only had her a day or two and you are wondering why she's quiet and unresponsive?

The poor thing is probably in mild shock and still getting used to her surrounding. This is worse if she has been traumatized in the past!

My dog was so quiet for like a week when I brought her home from the shelter and then she found her place so to speak and I couldn't shut her up!

She'll be fine.
 

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I have taken in a few older dogs, some adjust quickly while others fret. The male I have here the last few days is a fretter. He is getting better each day, trusting me more, eating better now, follows me alot, still a little unsettled. This is normal, they have had a different life previously, good or bad its what they are use to. Yours will soon learn the comforts of home and adjust well.

Whenever she growls at your hubby, regardless if you feel sorry for her you must let her know this is not on. At the same time tell your husband to totally ignore her and let her be the first to go to him. Make sure he has treats, so if she comes, let her take a treat of her own accord and she will soon realise he is ok.
 

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No matter how you feel about the rest and despite the fact that you may feel sorry for her, you should make it clear to her from day one that growling is not acceptable. I have rescued and fostered a variety of dogs including from a puppy mill. The mill dogs tend to be very insecure. These dogs don't benefit from your sympathy - they benefit from your training and direction (and love, but not just love). They are more comfortable if you tell them what to do -- don't just leave it to them to figure it out. The mill dogs have no basis to figure out any social protocol. Insecure dogs need direction. You don't need to be mean about it at all, but you should tell and show them (in a confident, calm way) what to do every step of the way. Go out when you say, get off the couch (or on the couch) when you say, come when you call, don't growl at anyone, eat this, eat it here, let me take it, etc. A firm "no" from you should be enough to stop the growling in this early stage.

Dogs are not people, but in some ways we are similar. Have you ever been in a situation where you were insecure and uncomfortable? It makes you feel more secure and more comfortable if the person in charge takes you from the beginning and tells you where to go, where to sit or what to do to get started in whatever the situation is vs leaving you standing there wondering and feeling nervous. Dogs only have so many options, so growling and possibly fear biting are bound to be choices insecure dogs make if not instructed otherwise. It is a sad direction for them to take -- help her now by making the right choices for her and making her follow your instructions. This way she will quickly learn from good experiences that no one and nothing is hurting her and you and your husband can be trusted and looked up to and that will make her secure and happy.

http://OtterTailArt.com
 

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She is a Schnoodle

Just show her love. And be firm on what she needs to learn. My Charlie a schnoodle is 4 months old and I got him from a breeder. I was looking for another white schnauzer and he looks more like a schnauzer than a poodle. I only had to pay $50 because he was 4 months old. He was outside in a run and a mess when I got him. I brought him home and clipped him. The vet gave him a good check up. He had no fleas or worms. He only had yeast in his ears. I give the lady credit she had a very clean kennell. He is so sweet and loving. Your dog will give you love for saving her.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Emma's has called my place home for just over a month and I feel as if I have really made progress. I just couldn't have asked for a better companion, smarter or more loving dog than Emma. Sometimes I catch her half smiling at me, but I still think she still remains a bit uncertain. She is really acceptant of my attention towards her and I am really beginning to feel her giving it back to me. She loves to put her paw gently on my arm at times, touching it several times when we are on the couch.

Guess Emma was a "dump" dog; a bunch of no-longer-needed dogs, too old for breeding are taken to the dump to be shot. Some dogs get away, and scatter and I guess Emma was one of them until rescued. We just don't know what kind of hellish past that these dogs have been through. It takes patience to break though a bad past and show an animal what a nice place to live, food, that no one's going to hurt them and love and caring and not be treated like a piece of garbage.

She still growls at my hubby, but I was told by the rescue group to ignore her and she'll come around.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have taken in a few older dogs, some adjust quickly while others fret. The male I have here the last few days is a fretter. He is getting better each day, trusting me more, eating better now, follows me alot, still a little unsettled. This is normal, they have had a different life previously, good or bad its what they are use to. Yours will soon learn the comforts of home and adjust well.

Whenever she growls at your hubby, regardless if you feel sorry for her you must let her know this is not on. At the same time tell your husband to totally ignore her and let her be the first to go to him. Make sure he has treats, so if she comes, let her take a treat of her own accord and she will soon realise he is ok.
I should have listened to you about growling at hubby. I was going about the wrong way telling her "NO" and the rescue group said to do what you said! Thx :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Emma is really getting used to her new home and feeling more confident that she is here to stay. She is wagging her tail; something that I am thrilled about compared to a tail that was always tucked under her back end. She still is wary of my hubby, growls a little, but with time she'll come to trust. This dog is so gentle and affectionate, sometimes looking at me with those huge eyes saying "I feel safe now".
 
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