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Hey guys,

So i've reached a point that as soon as I get my new rental agreement figured out for this summer, I'm going to start applying to adopt a dog. However, most rescues are very (and rightfully so) strict about who they accept.

My issues:
I will be renting, it will either be a 2 bedroom apartment (this apartment is huge guys, it's seriously an amazing building) or a 3 bedroom house, both allow two dogs and my roommate already has a sweetie pie of a lab. Landlord will approve my potential new dog based of a picture (to make sure it isn't one of their banned breeds :/).

The places I'm looking at do have yards out back but they are not fenced in. I have to live in this city while I'm attending veterinary school; there's no fenced in yards anywhere, but there are an abundance of fenced in dog parks very close to my location.

Most rescues I've been looking at REQUIRE a 6 foot fenced-in yard and a home visit. I'd be happy to have someone come look at my new place once I decide and sign the lease but a fence is not going to be an option anywhere in my area.

So, A. is it unfair of me to get a dog without a fenced back yard or have you guys been able to do it with success? Exercising a dog properly isn't quite synonymous in my mind with having a yard but maybe I'm being selfish?

and B. Do you guys think any rescues will even glance twice at my app if I don't have a fenced in yard or is that a deal breaker for everyone? I've been dabbling at rescuing a dog from Mexico or Spain from the rescues that ship dogs to the US to get adopted so I'm a little nervous about my application being accepted.

What do y'all think; am I doomed to rejection?
 

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I have adopted all my dogs except the last and have never had a fenced in yard
Around here all the rescues say fenced in yards are required but they give exceptions sometimes like if they are 3 yrs old or older or maybe harder to place dogs like bully breeds
But none of the rescues I've ever talked to would allow me to get a puppy without a fenced in yard which is one of the reasons why I bought my last dog from a breeder I wanted a puppy this time around
I haven't had any problems exercising my dogs without a fence I walk them every day and have a tie out to play fetch with them and train them outside I also Go out with them every time to potty on a leash
If anything I think it makes thing easier since I don't have to worry about them getting bad habits like digging in the yard since I'm always with them out there
It really depends on the rescue if they decide to reject based on no yard but most In my experience will work with you



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Honestly, putting the apartment issue aside for a moment, I'd be a little more concerned with taking on a rescued dog while attending veterinary school. You really have to consider whether you'll have the time, energy and resources to have a dog while you're going through a pretty rigorous degree program.

Maybe a cat would be a better option until you've gotten your DVM, and are settled in a more permanent location?
 

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Honestly, putting the apartment issue aside for a moment, I'd be a little more concerned with taking on a rescued dog while attending veterinary school. You really have to consider whether you'll have the time, energy and resources to have a dog while you're going through a pretty rigorous degree program.

Maybe a cat would be a better option until you've gotten your DVM, and are settled in a more permanent location?
Hi John, thank you for your input. I actually purposefully am in the middle of completing my first year without any pets whatsoever because I wanted to feel out what my workload and schedule would be like and to see if it was conducive to dog ownership. So far, I think I have way more "home time" than I did when I was working the normal 9-5. I live a five minute walk from my school and we have a 1.5 hour lunch break that I use to go on walks with my roommates and her dog.

My dog would need to be lower energy and content to be a study buddy on the couch during some evenings but so far I think that it seems doable for me (and the roughly 40% of my classmates who own dogs have been handling it quite well from the conversations I've had with them). Plus, we get reallllly nice discounts from school for any vet-related needs.

Believe me, I've asked myself your same question many times and I'm not just trying to shoehorn a dog into my life to be selfish, I'm doing my best to weigh out the pros and cons. If my second semester gets rough and I'm forced to reconsider, so be it, but at the moment, I think that I can be potentially be a good dog owner at this point.

(and roommate is allergic to cats unfortunately)
 

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Honestly, I?d just reach out to the rescue and let them know your plans to exercise and keep your dog safe without a fence. With my last dog I didn?t meet all of their criteria, but started a conversation and they were more than happy to adopt to me after talking.
 

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Are you looking for a particular breed, or would just like a lower energy rescue dog? If you are not looking for a particular breed then I'd advice trying your local animal shelter, they usually do not require a yard. I live in an apartment and two of my friends who live in the same apartment complex have adopted dogs from two local shelters. The shelters only requirement was that the apartment complex allowed dogs.

If you are looking for a certain breed then contact the rescue organizations of the breed or breeds you're interested in and see if they make exceptions to rule. It's my understanding that some will, it just depends on the organization.
 

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Hi John, thank you for your input. I actually purposefully am in the middle of completing my first year without any pets whatsoever because I wanted to feel out what my workload and schedule would be like and to see if it was conducive to dog ownership. So far, I think I have way more "home time" than I did when I was working the normal 9-5. I live a five minute walk from my school and we have a 1.5 hour lunch break that I use to go on walks with my roommates and her dog.

My dog would need to be lower energy and content to be a study buddy on the couch during some evenings but so far I think that it seems doable for me (and the roughly 40% of my classmates who own dogs have been handling it quite well from the conversations I've had with them). Plus, we get reallllly nice discounts from school for any vet-related needs.

Believe me, I've asked myself your same question many times and I'm not just trying to shoehorn a dog into my life to be selfish, I'm doing my best to weigh out the pros and cons. If my second semester gets rough and I'm forced to reconsider, so be it, but at the moment, I think that I can be potentially be a good dog owner at this point.

(and roommate is allergic to cats unfortunately)
Great answer. Sounds like you've thought this through.

Given what you've said about your situation, I think Poppy's advice is spot on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Are you looking for a particular breed, or would just like a lower energy rescue dog? If you are not looking for a particular breed then I'd advice trying your local animal shelter, they usually do not require a yard. I live in an apartment and two of my friends who live in the same apartment complex have adopted dogs from two local shelters. The shelters only requirement was that the apartment complex allowed dogs.

If you are looking for a certain breed then contact the rescue organizations of the breed or breeds you're interested in and see if they make exceptions to rule. It's my understanding that some will, it just depends on the organization.
I have a few breeds in mind so I've started to look at specific rescues, (Galgo and Podenco rescues in Spain in particular, I'm very into the work they're doing there for those breeds) but I'm also very open to checking out shelters. My local one has such a quick turnover for dogs that it's hard to even get in there and see a dog that's online before it's already been rehomed- which is amazing! But also not exactly a decision I want to be making the first time I see a dog.

Looks like I'll just have to poke around and find a rescue willing to work with me. Thanks for all the input guys!
 

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Are you looking for a particular breed, or would just like a lower energy rescue dog? If you are not looking for a particular breed then I'd advice trying your local animal shelter, they usually do not require a yard. I live in an apartment and two of my friends who live in the same apartment complex have adopted dogs from two local shelters. The shelters only requirement was that the apartment complex allowed dogs.

If you are looking for a certain breed then contact the rescue organizations of the breed or breeds you're interested in and see if they make exceptions to rule. It's my understanding that some will, it just depends on the organization.
I have a few breeds in mind so I've started to look at specific rescues, (Galgo and Podenco rescues in Spain in particular, I'm very into the work they're doing there for those breeds) but I'm also very open to checking out shelters. My local one has such a quick turnover for dogs that it's hard to even get in there and see a dog that's online before it's already been rehomed- which is amazing! But also not exactly a decision I want to be making the first time I see a dog.

Looks like I'll just have to poke around and find a rescue willing to work with me. Thanks for all the input guys!

Check out the thread on Nymeria - a user here (can?t tag because I?m on my phone and don?t remember the exact username!) just rescued a dog from Spain, I believe a Galgo mix? She might be able to point you in the direction of a good rescue.
 

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Hi John, thank you for your input. I actually purposefully am in the middle of completing my first year without any pets whatsoever because I wanted to feel out what my workload and schedule would be like and to see if it was conducive to dog ownership. So far, I think I have way more "home time" than I did when I was working the normal 9-5. I live a five minute walk from my school and we have a 1.5 hour lunch break that I use to go on walks with my roommates and her dog.

My dog would need to be lower energy and content to be a study buddy on the couch during some evenings but so far I think that it seems doable for me (and the roughly 40% of my classmates who own dogs have been handling it quite well from the conversations I've had with them). Plus, we get reallllly nice discounts from school for any vet-related needs.

Believe me, I've asked myself your same question many times and I'm not just trying to shoehorn a dog into my life to be selfish, I'm doing my best to weigh out the pros and cons. If my second semester gets rough and I'm forced to reconsider, so be it, but at the moment, I think that I can be potentially be a good dog owner at this point.

(and roommate is allergic to cats unfortunately)
Don't know what size you are looking for, but IMO a rescued Greyhound would fit in nicely with your lifestyle, and rescuing Greyhounds seems to me to be such a noble thing to do.
 

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Don't know what size you are looking for, but IMO a rescued Greyhound would fit in nicely with your lifestyle, and rescuing Greyhounds seems to me to be such a noble thing to do.
I actually am looking into greyhound rescues! I'm also particularly interested in the galgo (similar to greyhounds) and podenco breeds from Spain. They've got quite a few homeless dogs there and are in need of adopters. I found a greyhound rescue that's based in my city so I'm trying to get in contact with them to learn more about the breed and their dogs :)
 
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