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Hi!

I was planning on getting a toy poodle puppy after June, but after speaking to a prospective breeder I have fallen in love with a lovely young red toy poodle (8 months old) that she was planning on breeding but cannot due to the fact that the dog has cryptorchidism (retained testicles) and has offered him to me.

Does anyone have any experience of a dog with cryptorchidism?
I know that the dog must be castrated due to the highly increased risk of cancer and that the procedure is more invasive than a regular castration, but is there anything else I should be thinking of?

Or advice for bringing a young dog home that isn't a puppy?
Though I know that the dog will have had a positive upbringing, I'm still a little worried about bringing home a dog that I have not raised from puppy, even if it's just for things like the dog not being used to grooming etc.

Thanks in advance for any advice :D

Sian
 

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Surgery for a Cryptorchid is just more invasive because they have to cut into his abdomen (like a female spay) so he'll be in a little more pain and have to stay calmer after a surgery but other than that, it's fine.

Just find a vet that you absolutely trust to make sure the testicles are actually removed, for the very reason you mention: the increase risk of cancer.

The breeder should also be aware that there is a cryptorchid somewhere else in her line for this pup to have been a cryptorchid. I'm glad she's conscientious enough to not try to breed him.

Good Luck!
 

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Surgery for a Cryptorchid is just more invasive because they have to cut into his abdomen (like a female spay) so he'll be in a little more pain and have to stay calmer after a surgery but other than that, it's fine.

Just find a vet that you absolutely trust to make sure the testicles are actually removed, for the very reason you mention: the increase risk of cancer.

The breeder should also be aware that there is a cryptorchid somewhere else in her line for this pup to have been a cryptorchid. I'm glad she's conscientious enough to not try to breed him.

Good Luck!
Thank you for your reply Holly! I will definitely make sure to find a reputable vet if I do decide to go ahead with the adoption.

The dog's owner received him from a breeder friend so I assume the original owner has been notified about it and will look into her breed lines.
 

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Surgery for a Cryptorchid is just more invasive because they have to cut into his abdomen (like a female spay) so he'll be in a little more pain and have to stay calmer after a surgery but other than that, it's fine.

Just find a vet that you absolutely trust to make sure the testicles are actually removed, for the very reason you mention: the increase risk of cancer.

The breeder should also be aware that there is a cryptorchid somewhere else in her line for this pup to have been a cryptorchid. I'm glad she's conscientious enough to not try to breed him.

Good Luck!
This. As far as I can find theres not really any other risk factors beyond the 'spay-like' surgery for the neuter, but you do need to make sure your vet will be honest with you if they can't find both testicles. My younger dog will be neutered this summer for the exact same reason.
 
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