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Okay, so my dream was to get a dog into agility. I worked on a lot of home taught agility with Pepper as a kid. I loved every moment of it, though we never did anything formally. This is kind of going to be a journal that I'm hoping people can comment on and give advice. I'll be posting up videos when I can.

I don't exactly have the funds to enroll in formal classes right now, but I am taking a building confidence class with some agility equipment as well as doing foundation work right now. I'm also talking with my trainer and she wants to get her own dog into agility and is talking about setting up classes with a great trainer a little ways from us. I have a cheap agility set from outward hound that has a small tunnel, weave poles, a jump and a tire jump.

Aayla is only 6 months old so the jumping is very minimal and when she does do it, its very short, only 6 inches off the ground. I won't seriously be jumping until her vet says her growth plates have closed (I'm guessing around 16-18 months?)

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Right now what I'm working on is equipment confidence, tug drive and sending.

She loves climbing up on things and overall seems confident with the tasks I give her. Already I ask her to walk along retaining walls, go up and down things on command. Though recently has developed some fears of man holes and storm drains which makes me think that height may play a thing for her. Yet she seems so confident otherwise that I think it will fade with time. I'm not expecting her to do a dogwalk or see saw anytime soon. Though I would love to get a wobble board. She does love platform training.

Tug drive is going pretty good, she is all willing to accept a tug as a reward 70% of the time. The other 30% is in situations when she decides that my toy is not one she wants, or no reward would outweigh the thing she wants (saying hello to dog...) I feel like I need a special toy that she would want above all things.

Her sending is going great I have to say. We play a game of sending her around and object in the way I tell her to go. I will stand in the middle of four pillars in our parking area and practice sending her around the poles in different orders. She loves it for sure. I have some exercises I want to do with her after reading some articles. I have to really work on my own handling which I honestly think is going to be the hardest part. For some reason I have been sloppy recently. My trainer noticed the other day that when I get frustrated because Aayla is distracted, I will say "sit down" and Aayla will lay down, when I actually wanted her to sit. She pointed out on how I need to be more careful with my cues.

We also did a pinwheel with jumps last week, all set about 4-6 inches off the ground. We were supposed to just go in a circle both ways and have our dogs go over the poles. (after warm up of jumping straight to a target) Aayla easily did it but I struggled with signalling with my closest hand to her, and working the leash over the standards. The best part was though after class I was able to stay and do another round where I tested to see if she would just do what was in front of her or if she would pay attention to me. She was so focused that I could be doing a clockwise circle, abruptly turn to do anti-clockwise and she would follow with ease, even skipping jumps to send across the circle on cue. I didn't take the exercise too seriously as agility training but it felt good to know she was in tune and that sending her and directing her is going to be easier than I thought.

Off leash work is going to be a task but I hope that comes with age.

Anyone know other good foundation exercises I can work on? Is there videos I can watch on handling so I can work on improving and not confuse her?
 
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Clean run is my go to for all agility stuff. They have DVDs on handling systems I think. You can also Google Silvia Trkman (this is her website). She has tons of articles and videos.
In terms of critical foundation stuff, I highly recommend a Susan Salo jumping program. I have both her adult dog jumping for Levi and her puppy jumping program for Heidi. It's amazing how much important information on HOW to jump is left out of agility programs. :)
Levi had a fear of manhole covers too for a while, but he CC'd out of it. Tonight on our walk he went and stood on one and looked at us like "Hello - where's my cookie?!"
 

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Have a blast working with agility!!!

As for advice on where to go for on line resources... A person new to the sport can get greatly confused very quickly with all of the different handling systems out there. I recommend going with something that you can easily morph into any other system as you "age" into the sport. Susan Garrett's Handling 360 is pretty much a "meat and potatoes" type handling system. It will work for most teams. You might check out Susan Garrett's website and stuff. She is heavy into marketing, but her stuff is generally pretty good.

The best thing is to find a good trainer who can teach you how to develop a handling system that works for YOUR team. In other words, not a cookie cutter system, but one that works specifically with your team's strengths and weaknesses.

Unfortunately, agility is a rich person's sport. :( It costs money to learn, and it costs money to trial. I wish it were more accessible to those without the extra funds for such a leisure sport.

There are a ton of free resources these days, and a determined trainer can have a lot of fun training what they learn on line. Good luck!
 

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Groundwork! At this age, you want to work a lot with groundwork. How's her recall? Does she come to side? If you're going to be doing 2o2o then work on hand touching, then target touching, and then I build a small wood plank that we will walk down and target touch with 2o2o to work on them learning to nail that touch without the stress on their joints of the incline. My trainer recommended a video off Clean run called Foundation Fundamentals by Mary Ellen Barry that is awesome to do with baby dogs. It's all done with no equipment. Foundation is really the best stuff you can work on right now. Also, maybe watch as many videos as possible and watch the people. I found training the dogs is the easiest part, and most of the time we screw up, it's my fault.
 
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jclark is right. With a six month old pup, work the foundation stuff first. Don't be doing equipment yet. Just good old fashioned solid obedience, focus, recalls, shadow handling, wobble board, etc. :)
 

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Also, crate games. If she likes her crate at home, maybe try taking her to a park or something and setting up a crate and teaching her to relax in other more public places. Agility is a lot of hurry up and wait, and dogs spend a lot of time in crates in between runs. Make sure that's not going to be a horribly uncomfortable situation for her.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for the great advice, its good stuff to look into and research on. I'm excited to go through all of the info!
@Shandula We have started CCing for the man holes and storm drains. She does well with that but it hasn't stopped her initial reaction to avoid it. Its getting better, but still has those moments of 'it's a hole to hell I swear!' She shapes herself right onto the man hole's though if I just pause and wait. Do you think I could rent that video and take notes for the 14 days I would have it for? Then get enough from it to understand it?
@agilityk9trainer I'm just looking for the most basic right now to get a hold of teaching her basics and doing it right. So that one sounds great! I'll save more serious stuff under trainers. Talk about expenses though, I have an expensive taste in hobbies (except hiking....at least that one is free). Between the horseback riding and the agility goals my dreams are made of, I'm never going to have a lot of money. Haha.
@jclark343 - She is pretty far along in her obedience. She has a solid recall for most situations. We have to proof it more in proximity of other dogs, but recalls away from running cats, people and just loves her sit/down/stand waits for a recall. She can heel on both left and right and switch in front of me with ease. She loves touch and targets my hand almost perfectly. She walks pretty good off leash, and will offer her heel/switches and recalls in a medium distraction environment. I'm having trouble getting a helper to add a high distraction environment to practice with.

The crate would be something that I can almost guarantee she will need more work on. So I can work on that for now. I'll also work up on 2020 with a plank. Though honestly I'm not to familiar with what the 2020 actually is. I know its a way to teach hitting your marks, but I'm unsure what to be asking for.
 

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Rachel Sanders has a good DVD on how to train a 2o/2o. You will want to have a solid understanding of how to train it before you begin. It can be messed up really easily. :)

Lots to train there. Have fun!!
 

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Yesterday I had intentions of going to a dog show that had conformation and rally. I also wanted to bring Aayla to get her used to a show environment more. So I packed both of us up and headed out. On my way there I happened to notice an Agility trial going on. So I did a quick u-turn and parked there instead.

I was incredibly nervous to just drop in so I waited out in the parking lot for a while. The facility was all fenced in with a closed gate. So I didn't feel comfortable just walking in. So I ended up talking to someone who was hanging out next to their dogs in their car. She was very friendly and said that I was welcome to go in and spectate as long as I stayed at least 10' away from the ring. She said as long as Aayla bothered no one I could take her in too.

Everyone was so welcoming and helpful. I ended up finding a bench behind the e-z-ups to sit with Aayla. It was out of the way but I could still watch the ring. The people who I was sitting close all came over to say hello to Aayla and ask if I was getting her used to the environment, what trainer I was under and when I would be starting. When I told them I was still looking (everyone though Aayla was at least a year too) and hadn't started yet they were very helpful in telling what to look for and avoid in trainers as well as tell me about the best local trainer in the area. They also told me to train with multiple trainers if I can and take in a lot of information from everywhere.

I got a lot of information, and felt very welcomed into the community. It was a lot of fun. I stayed for a couple of hours before heading out. I also have a trainer in mind to start out with that was highly suggested by a few people. She is within a 15-20 minute drive of me! Which is great. Supposedly all positive, and focuses on handling more than most trainers that are local. Anyone heard of Stacy Winkler? She supposedly has online classes and holds group/private classes. The prices don't seem too outrageous either.

Aayla did really great for the atmosphere. A lot of dogs getting hyped up around us and running around. So she had a few moments of thinking it was play time but a few settling commands had her calming down. She spent most of the time laying down at my feet and watching. I would walk her around when she got antsy and riled up but overall did amazing for that setting.
 

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I am glad you got up the nerve to go in. :) Spectators are always welcome, and while agility competitors don't like the general public bringing in their dogs, we DO like future agility dogs to come in to socialize (like the person you talked to said...as long as they don't bother anyone). So it's great you did both. :)

Talking to competitors at agility trials is the best way to learn who to train with. Most good agility instructors don't advertise. Their classes fill via word of mouth. If you want to find them, you have to go plug into the "word of mouth." You did!!

I have not heard of the trainer, but it doesn't mean anything. And she is very close to you too. Bonus!!
 

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I am glad you got up the nerve to go in. :) Spectators are always welcome, and while agility competitors don't like the general public bringing in their dogs, we DO like future agility dogs to come in to socialize (like the person you talked to said...as long as they don't bother anyone). So it's great you did both. :)

Talking to competitors at agility trials is the best way to learn who to train with. Most good agility instructors don't advertise. Their classes fill via word of mouth. If you want to find them, you have to go plug into the "word of mouth." You did!!

I have not heard of the trainer, but it doesn't mean anything. And she is very close to you too. Bonus!!
It was pretty hard, I honestly sat in my car in the parking lot for a good 20 minutes! Haha. It was pretty packed inside the facility so for one I couldn't even figure out where I would spectate from. I'm glad everyone was so friendly, otherwise I might have just left. I'm always pretty concerned about trying to not bother anyone. I would hate to put someone or their dog off on their run!

I was really happy I went and people were very helpful. So hopefully over the next month or two I can get in contact with that trainer and get in her foundation classes for puppies. Also while watching the trial I figured that its not 2020 but 2o2o. I'm guessing that's two on two off right?

In other news I've been doing a lot with training with Aayla, I have been learning a big obstacle is going to be impulse control. So working on some impulse control with her toys. Its slow work. I don't want to do a flirt pole because of her age, so I'm going to have to find some impulse control games for her.

I worked on some sending exercises over the past week or so. That way I can work on some directions and positioning. I can get her to a heel on either side, send and have her return to a side of my choice. I'll work on this around trees, posts, signs and anything I find.

 

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@ThatYellowDog - Yep, 2 on, 2 off. :) I'm actually working on training both 2o2o and RC because I want a running A-frame at the very least.

Impulse control is HUGE. Levi loves loves loves the A-frame (probably because of his love of climbing). That's awesome, but I need you to do these jumps instead...

You've got tons of time before you have to do any "real" equipment, so I think you'll be super ready when it's go time. :)
 

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@Shandula

What do you do for impulse control? I loved the flirt pole for Dino, but until Aayla is done growing I don't want her twisting and jumping for it.

She already loves any type of equipment, in her confidence building class (that uses some agility equipment. She is a nut wanting to do everything as fast as possible. I don't think I've ever seen a dog run while crawling. We had a tarp set up that they had to crawl under and she wouldn't even maintain her sit/wait so I could get to the other side. Its the same for the table and tunnels. She is shaking and crying and I spent more time reinforcing her sit/down and wait then actually doing any exercises.

Like she needed the confidence building class. Ha! It was more to help fill up space for the trainers while waiting for her next class series to start. I'm debating intermediate obedience or rally novice. My trainers said that beginner obedience would be a joke to her. The IO says its for teaching a heel, recall and stay. Which she knows all of them, its just reinforcing those in very high stimulation environments.
 

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For impulse control I do two main things: It's Yer Choice and Crate Games, both from Susan Garrett.

Crate games is simply awesome, not only does it build tons of value for the crate (wahoo!), but the dogs really seem to instantly grasp that sitting and waiting for a release is what starts all the fun things.

IYC is the best thing, ever. Basically you control the consequences not the dog. Make a good choice by sitting and waiting - go do the A-frame! (Or get the cookie, your toy, go say hello etc.) Break the sit position? Oops sorry, no response from me, and no reinforcement.

You basically start out the same way you'd teach off/leave it: I start super easy, with cookies in my hand. Show them to the dog, and wait. If he tries to take them, I close my fist, I don't pull it away. I continue this until he backs off, then I give him one. You then build this game into everything you do. It does not have a cue. I like it because it gives self-control (dog makes the choice) rather than me cuing him to "Off!" You can read a little about it here.

Heidi too is way too advanced for a lot of the classes she is the appropriate age for. However, anytime I'm able to put her in a class to test/proof her behaviors, I always consider it a win. Rally novice is awesome, and I think you guys would do really well and enjoy it quite a bit.
 

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LOL!! Here's my opinion on super high drive dogs. (I own a few, btw.) :)

You WANT an agility dog shaking at the startline. :D That's awesome. Even screaming is good if the dog can still work through it. Be sure to reward the stays, but don't try and take any of that drive off of her. You learn to work WITH the drive - not against it. That means you give up some things you thought were important - such as a heel, a dog that sits quietly by your side, a good obedience dog. Instead you embrace the wild child. You learn what you will accept and what you won't. You work toward those goals.

For example with my boy Asher. He couldn't get NEAR an agility ring without lunging and barking at whatever was moving in the ring. I spent hours working in the parking lot of my facility while dogs were out in the field working. We had to hide behind cars, reward for good behavior, and then step out where the working dog was visible from a distance. Asher would work for a few seconds and the lose it, lunging and barking at the working dog. We would step back behind the car and work for control. Once we got control, we would repeat. Literally hundreds and thousands of repetitions.

It took FOREVER to get him to the point where he could go to the start line with minimal, half-hearted lunging (if at all). Now, there is no lunging.

So, what I did was see what behaviors I had to have. I HAD to have a dog that reacted appropriately at the ring gate. I could not have a lunging dog. That would be dangerous for him and those around him. I had to have a dog that would be able to listen through the drive. He had to be controlled enough to have a solid recall, a four jump lead out stay, solid contacts, respond to handing cues, etc.

He did NOT have to walk in heel. He did have to walk sort of well on a leash. I would allow some pulling, but not pulling so hard I was at risk of losing control of him. He did NOT have to sit quietly by my side. He could do some barking, but not a ton. He could jump on me. (I don't care). He could then jump on others. (I warn them if they want to pet him that he will jump all over them.) He can act up in certain situations in the house.

In short - I chose my battles wisely. I didn't want to squash his wonderful, wild personality with too much obedience and forced control. I wanted him under control, but not to the point of "losing" who Asher is at his core. I wanted ALL that drive going into the sport. I have seen dog after dog lose or diminish their drive in the quest of "impulse control." I have also seen the reverse where a dog is allowed too much freedom in the quest of not diminishing drive. These dogs are a danger to themselves and others. There is a fine line to walk here where you can get the control without losing a bit of the drive. Very few can walk it. Most just give up and lose some of the drive. If you talk with these handlers, almost all will say they didn't lose any drive, but if you watch the dog over time, you see the drive - and yes the joy - leak away. The dog still may be fast and be having some fun, but it's not like it was before. You can keep all of the drive and joy and still maintain control. Just pick your battles.

BTW a good way to see if your dog is losing drive is to keep track of your yards per second. If your dog is losing yards per second as it matures in the sport, it is losing drive. You actually should see your yards per second increase as you and your dog develop into a team and pull tighter lines. Note that this obviously won't be true as the dog ages into his senior years, but it will hold true for the young dogs moving through the ranks of the sport.

That's my humble opinion. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@Shandula I haven't done any crate games in a long time. Maybe I should start that up again. Especially since I am trying to start working with Kota more but its hard when she is jealous that he gets attention.

What else do you use for its yer choice? I taught her to leave it with that technique but how else can I challenge her. At times I do shaping for trick training, but she seems to get more amped up. When I'm out in public I'm always rewarding a lay down and calm behavior, is that a form of it? I don't ask for those behaviors but just reward when she does it.
@agilityk9trainer - Haha I'm glad to hear that. I can tell already she is going to have crazy drive and a love for the sport. I just worry about her getting too amped before we have even started training. It seems like that its okay and we may be able to work through it.

While I was watching the agility trial some of the most hyper up and fastest dogs were the ones that blew obstacles because they couldn't focus on their handler and the handler couldn't keep up. I kind of feel like that's going to be Aayla. I feel like I'm going to have no reining her in! I feel like I need to not encourage it yet.

Though her toy drive is increasing so I am liking that. I'm able to use it a lot for training and getting faster responses from her.

Outside of the trials are you able to have a calmer more responsive dog? I mean I would like to do rally and agility but is that a lot to ask as they both require very different energy levels?
 

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I definitely think it is possible to have a drivey agility dog and a more relaxed obedience dog.
For example, Levi in agility, has a GREAT sit-stay, but if you look at his hind legs, they are very shaky, he's a spring, ready to go. (He actually performs a little scream/bark when he completes a sequence. However, as a demo dog for my beginner obedience class, he is cool, calm, collected. I think they can tell the difference based on the energy and the tasks they have to do.

IYC can be anything where she has the ability to do something reinforcing, but instead she picks (in the trainer's mind) the "right choice". So if she watches a squirrel running, but instead of leaping forward she looks at you, that's a great IYC moment.
I use it a lot to proof stays. If I have you in a stand, you should stay there, even if I'm tossing cookies and toys around you. :p
 
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Shandula,

You aren't talking about the same kind of "drive." :) It is rare to see the type of "drive" I am discussing. It canNOT be controlled with "treat" training because this type of drive is FAR BIGGER than any treat reward. In other words, the dog has the choice of a treat or reacting to motion....motion will win EVERY time. The reward of reacting to motion is FAR greater than a treat or a toy.

You probably have not worked with this type of dog. They are a bit rare. Yes, I own one. :) I used IYC for about a year to no avail.

Can your dog do both agility and obedience? Of course, as I have always said. If you do a lot of obedience will you lose some speed. Absolutely. Is that a problem? It depends on your goals for your dog.

If Aayla is as drivey as her description, her owner may want to really focus on agility. Asking for too much control will - yes will - slow that drive down, even if just a hair. Is this an issue? It depends on her owner's goals. For me, yes, it would be a huge issue. I want my dog as fast as possible on the course and yet controllable. I don't want them to do obedience. They and I find obedience dull (yes, I have trained to the Utility level). I find Rally dull too, although I do think it's a good "obedience" track for agility dogs if their owners want to go that route.

In short, if I had a dog like Aayla, I would personally be looking at keeping every speck of drive she has and working WITH the drive - not against it. I would be choosing my battles and enjoying the dog she is. I would not be asking her to become something else just for my benefit to do Rally. If Aayla loves Rally or obedience, awesome!! Then if you want to, go for it. But, IMHO, if I owned a super drive dog, i would be focusing on her strengths - the super drive - an putting it to work in a super drive sport like agility or herding.

I have been in agility for 20 years now and have watched a lot of teams. I personally believe you play to your dog's strengths and don't ask the dog to do something not in it's personality's wheelhouse. I had a dog who hated agility. Although that's what I want to do, I stopped showing her. She wanted to be a house dog, so she got to be a house dog. I have another dog who loved Rally and obedience - even more than agility. He got to play Rally and obedience. I had another dog who loved to do it all. He got to do it all. Asher dallied in Rally to see if he'd like it. He HATED it. He doesn't have to do it. He is super high drive, and so I encouraged that drive for agility. My new pup, Aenon, seems to be of the same vein. He thinks Rally is "whatever" and boring. We will revisit it briefly in a few years after he has aged a bit more to see if his opinion has changed. Until then, we will be doing agility. You can see by my titles below, I have done all of that to very high levels with my dogs, and my students have done all of that and more with their dogs. They do it though, with the understanding, that adding in obedience will more than likely affect the dog's speed in agility. If they don't mind losing .2 to .5 seconds a yard in speed and their dog enjoys doing the other sports, then no problem. But if you have a very special, super high drive dog, you want to think twice first.

All that said...Yellowdog... You were watching the Nationals feed. This is a super competitive trial. The handlers were pushing their high drive dogs for speed. This extra "push" sent many of their dogs through the contact zone, especially in the Challenger's round and the Final's round. When I ran my dog in the Challenger's round, I did NOT call for a contact. It was a hit and go, and we risked whether he would hit or not with that extra speed and push. He did hit, btw. :) At normal trials and training, these teams would be working on 2o/2o or be working their decel or strides or whatever their criteria is to get their dogs to hit the zone. At Nationals, it's usually push for all you are worth and hope for the best. :)

I suggest you sit back and dream about Aayla. What is your dream for her? Do you want her to be an agility champion? Do you dream she'll be on the World Team? Do you dream she will compete in local trials? Do you dream she'll get Novice titles? Do you dream you will have fun with her in class? What is the ultimate for you? All of those are excellent dreams, but you need to know your dream to plan how to train to it.

If your dream is Nationals or Worlds, then you don't want an ounce of speed lost due to other types of training. If your dream is an agility championship but you don't really care about National or World competition, then adding in obedience and losing a bit of speed may be something you'd like to do, depending on Aayla's preferences. If your goal in local trials and/or maybe a novice title, then by all means, look into other games to play along the way as well. If your dream is a versatile team that dabbles in a lot of sports, then if it first Aayla to do so, do it. But do it knowing the risks you will take by cross training the sports. If your dream is an obedience OTCH or obedience nationals, then I'd say forego agility until Aayla is much older.

But, IMHO, no matter what sport you do, you do it with the goal of maintaining Aayla's personality as much as possible. If Asher sat quietly at my feet, he wouldn't be Asher. He would be a watered down version of Asher - but not Asher. Asher is crazed. He LIVES. He is all about it being in the moment with every ounce of energy he has. I need to rein that in so he and other dogs are safe and so he will respond to my commands, but I don't want to step on that beautiful wild child. I used to get dirty looks from obedience folks, but even they now understand the necessity of keeping a dog like Asher LIKE Asher for his drive in agility. I would, however, keep Asher like Asher regardless. He would be, IMHO, less without his over the top energy.

You love the drive, and you learn to work with that drive - not against it.

BTW, I'm not going to edit this, so I hope it makes sense and doesn't have too many typos. :)
 

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First off, congrats on getting started in agility! Biscuit just got started last year.
I've only really consulted with a trainer once, and her advice was very helpful.
Teach your dog to walk at your side as you walk in a circle. Give a command, such as "with me!". Go clockwise and counter-clockwise with your dog on your right and your left.
This helped Biscuit a lot in learning to follow me.
Also, try something such as a bully stick to be super-duper high motivation.
Biscuit only really gets a greenie after agility competitions, and he loves it.
I've seen others give their dogs everything from fresh cauliflower to cheese wiz.
Or, find an awesome toy, maybe one that has fur in it. Biscuit has one and LOVES it.

I hope you enjoy agility!
 

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@agilityk9trainer - You have given me a lot to think about! I've always dreamed about doing agility, for a long time it was just doing any agility, practicing at home as a kid with my family dog to the practices I got to do at training facilities. I never got to a point where I felt like I could actually dive into it. I feel like I have that chance with Aayla. Mentioning nationals or worlds makes my heart race. I would die if I could get a dog to that level, just to even run a course at high level would be amazing! There is this shadow that I know that comes with the fact that this sport isn't cheap. As a recent graduate and no solid career yet I'm a bit run thin. So I think realistically Aayla might only be doing local events. Some championships would be great if we could.

So talking about drive. I don't think Aayla is the same as your Asher. I've gotten comments of how mellow she is. She has been to a grooming expo, breweries, dog shows and my work. Everyone always remarks on how calm she is. I don't find her a low energy dog by far though. I think its just been a conditioned settle that I have worked on since 8 weeks. She loves to be busy when at home either playing with toys or interacting somehow. We've had to work on a 'no more' already so we can be left in peace.

Yet when it comes to certain activities that require more energy, she gets a sharper focus than with her basic obedience. The only times I've seen her really focus and want to focus is when we introduced her to the agility equipment for the confidence class. I was able to go through the obstacles off leash, with other people and dogs around. Normally she is very driven to go to other dogs and people. When she has a tunnel in front of her its like they're not there. Yet when she is finished she seems rather uninterested in my offered tug reward, and will take the treats but isn't expecting them as a reward. I feel like the rewarding part is getting to do the obstacles.

Is this the type of drive you are talking about? I feel like Aayla might be more like Levi as Shandula was describing but I'm trying to find the difference in what you are explaining.

How can I push her drive more? How can I encourage and help it grow right now? I've been trying to up her tug drive, but I feel like I always fail to have a toy she wants because I have to use one that's at the facility, cause she won't touch hers. She goes crazy for tug reward when she is at home, but at the facility its boring. I have a video to upload that shows what I've been doing to replace treats with her tug toy more. I'll upload that soon, I have a love hate relationship with recording the raw training sessions. Its an easy way to point out my own flaws or when I'm being confusing or sloppy.
 
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