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I have some strong feelings about this story. I feel horribly for the family and even worse for that little 5 year old boy who was bitten but I also feel bad for the dog (a boxer/bulldog mix) that was euthanized.

All animals that come into AACo Animal Control are temperament tested, no animal is adopted out to a family with children under the age of 5 (I believe, this was how it was when I was a child). Family's with newly adopted pets are provided with guidelines and information packets on how to introduce your new pet to your home.

It was a large error in judgement that lead to this event, this new dog was out of his element. Just hours after being brought to his now home he was left unattended with a 5 year old child. I don't believe you EVER leave a child unattended with a dog but especially with a newly adopted dog in a recipe for disaster.

Anne Arundel Animal Control is not a no-kill shelter/rescue and they have put a hold on the placement of all animals except cats into any home, shelter, or rescue. This means that because of this incedent that not only a single dog could be euthanized but many more lives could be lost if the shelter reaches capacity (they refuse to release how close they are to capacity).

From on of the articles I really hated the statement "will try to use a sliding scale based on the dog's size and potential for serious injuries, to make decisions." A small dog that is trying to be aggressive has the potential to do as much damage as a large dog just delivering a warning bite to back off or ticking they are playing.

In the end I just don't think that one parents mistake should result in a stop to all adoptions. Raise the minimum age of a child in the household, require a couple hour class to teach children proper dog interaction class, require and introducing a dog to your new home class. In the end no matter the policy mistake by adopters will still be made and this is what this sounds like a scared dog, a kid who didn't know how to interact with the dog properly, and a giant mistake my the parents.

Adoptions at Animal Control suspended after dog attack on boy causes serious injuries - Capital Gazette
Dog attacks 5-year-old in Anne Arundel County - ABC2News.com
5-year-old boy seriously injured after attack by recently adopted dog
Police: Boy, 5, attacked by dog family just adopted | Maryland News - WBAL Home
 
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Whahhhh, now dogs are supposed to be guarenteed childsafe???
Dogs are not toys, they are animals, they have brains, they have teeth, they have emotions and feelings, they can be neurotic, frightened, aggressive, joyful, gentle, etc....
The ultimate end of a consumer society. Dogs are not robots.
Sorry, for the rant, but I find it incredible that an animal shelter is expected to be responsible for a dogs behaviour, 'good with kids' is a best guess and nothing more.
I'm about to adopt a 'good with cats' dog, and I can tell you that dog will not be getting unsupervised access to my cats for a good while, and intro's will start on a leash. The adopter will expect no less from us.
 

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@Artdog this was exactly how I felt. It made me so irritated. Trucker when I adopted him was classified a "nervous" but "Good with People", "Cat Tested and Good With Cats", "Good with Kids", etc. dog. Let's just say that my highly reactive dog likes to chase, bark, and "tree" my cat (he would never actually hurt him but he defiantly thinks it is fun to play chase with him) and with run, hide, and go catatonic around strangers.

I would totally classify my cat as a "Good with Kids" animal as he has grown up around them but I would never leave my cat alone with a 5 year old. My goddaughter, who is 5, while she has grown up with my cat and loves him and has been taught to appropriately play and touch him still sometimes gets over excited and YELLS at him or corners him or hits him with the cat toy on a stick in her joy or pets a little to hard. It is why we as adults are need to stop things, as my mom says, "at the peak of fun" for everyone's safety.
 

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They may as well ban people of childbearing age. My first dog that I owned (eg not a family pet) was a dog that was surrendered at age 4 who had been purchased as a puppy. The parents had an 10yo, 7yo and 2yo....so obviously the youngest came after the dog. It was a Jack Russell

They did their due dilligence, planned to keep the dog, had headed off all of her escape artist ways. She had been known to climb 12 foot barbed wire chainlink fences to escaped (got away from the dog sitter with that trick) This is a dog who lost her life because she got out of a crate and out of a locked car at a highway rest-stop. She was wildly smart and the only way I kept her crated was an airport crate flipped towards the wall with a cinderblock on top and a cinderblock behind.

At any rate they surrendered the dog because their 2yo and the dog were best buddies, they both had a long list of dangerous tricks, including the child letting the dog out of the house, and the dog letting the child out of the yard. They both managed to climb on top of a free standing refrigerator, broke baby gates, managed to get inside the couch....all within moments. They finally gave up the dog when a neighbor threatened CPS after both the dog and child escaped from a locked bedroom and the dog from a locked crate in a closet and they made their way outside well after midnight. It was only the home alarm that went off when they opened the outside door that let the parents know something was amiss.

The shelter would not adopt the dog back out to anyone with children for their own sake. This dog was not agressive, loved everyone and was especially tender with babies. So I think judgment should be up to each individual shelter because "aggression is not always the reason to stop and adoption. And this dog was AMAZING with children...but that didn't mean it should be in a family with them.
 

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Very sad. Young children and dogs need supervision at all times. We can't expect dogs just to take anything kids do to them and not react.

I have 2 young nieces(3 & 2 years old) and they adopted a Puggle puppy about a year ago. These 2 girls are the most happy well behaved kids I ever met but they played way too rough with the dog. Especially when it was trying to sleep. Pulling legs and ears. It was during a family party and everyone was distracted but I eventually seen them and stopped them. Unfortunately my youngest son (8 yrs old) felt bad for the dog and before I knew it the dog gave him a good bite to the nose. It looked like a nose piercing. The dog obviously thought my son was going to play rough too. My son was startled but fine. I explained to him why it happened and he didn't think twice about later playing with the dog.

I told my brother-in-law about his kids and the rough play and he immediately talked to his girls and they have watched the interaction closely. A year later the dog and kids live in harmony. Of course it's still a process and they are growing together. Now our dogs are best.

Another story scares me more though. A friend of ours has a gorgeous blue nose pit. His daughter is super high energy. She literally jumps and climbs all over this dog. It scares me to the point I can't watch. As far as the dog's reaction, well she gives no reaction. It doesn't seem to bother her. If I didn't know better I would say she liked it. I told them they need to watch and of course they think it's fine.

Irresponsible owners scare me. Especially with pits cause the breed is so scrutinized. Amazing dogs in my opinion.
 
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