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Don't make the same mistake we did. Before you feel bad, there's a happy ending.
Our Airedale-cross was 11 years old, but he was absolutely amazing. If I didn't know different, I'd say he was still 2 years old. So much energy, so much character, so much fun. Everyone thinks he's a puppy.
But a while back we noticed he was having a hard time pooping and was hardly eating. We were feeding him the same food that he had always liked. Otherwise, he seemed fine.
He was so youthful that it hadn't even occurred to me that even if he/we didn't know he was getting older, his innards did.
It turned out that, as young as he still acted, we had to change to Senior food. I realize this isn't exactly ground-breaking information. But maybe some of you have a dog that seems way less than his years and are making the same mistake.
What amazes me is that Doug, that's his name, knew that the food was causing his discomfort and wouldn't eat it. How could he possibly make that connection?
Dogs are amazing!
So turn your dog to senior food when the years say, not when he seems old.
Randy
 

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Honestly I've never used a senior food. I've never had a reason to.

I feed raw now and have for the last 7 years or so. I've got 2 senior dogs that have been on raw that long and they're doing fabulously.
 

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Don't make the same mistake we did. Before you feel bad, there's a happy ending.
Our Airedale-cross was 11 years old, but he was absolutely amazing. If I didn't know different, I'd say he was still 2 years old. So much energy, so much character, so much fun. Everyone thinks he's a puppy.
But a while back we noticed he was having a hard time pooping and was hardly eating. We were feeding him the same food that he had always liked. Otherwise, he seemed fine.
He was so youthful that it hadn't even occurred to me that even if he/we didn't know he was getting older, his innards did.
It turned out that, as young as he still acted, we had to change to Senior food. I realize this isn't exactly ground-breaking information. But maybe some of you have a dog that seems way less than his years and are making the same mistake.
What amazes me is that Doug, that's his name, knew that the food was causing his discomfort and wouldn't eat it. How could he possibly make that connection?
Dogs are amazing!
So turn your dog to senior food when the years say, not when he seems old.
Randy
I agree with you Randy. I have had my Casper since he was 8 years old (he's 12 yrs and 4 months now) and I have been feeding him senior dog food ever since. Some of my colleagues who think they know better because they have had dogs in the past, have laughed it off but I couldn't care less. Casper is my first dog and I'd err on the side of caution. I think the senior food really contributes to better agility and shinier coat in older dogs and is definitely worth the extra price to be paid.:thumbsup:
 

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You know the senior dog foods are usually just formulated for overweight dogs/dogs w super low activity levels (read low calorie/low protein), plus they have glucosamine. That's all. Nothing special about them.
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