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Hello,

This is my first time I’ve ever tried posting to one of these sites. My girlfriend and I have recently adopted an 8 month old Jindo from Korea. We have had him for a month so far, and he is well behaved for the most part, but a couple of weeks ago we ran into the problem of him not wanting to go through our door outside.

For a little context, we live on the third floor of an apartment building, which already posed a problem. There are only exterior stairs which he resisted going up and down the first few days, but managed to do after seeing us go a few times. At this point he would follow us out the door no problem for about two weeks and then on the first day of the third week, he refused to get near the door.

We think this might be because the day prior we decided to walk him to the park area across the street. We had done this a couple of times before, and didn’t think it would be a problem, but this time there happened to be a lot of people out. He might have gotten spooked as now he reacts with fear whenever he hears people being loud or children screaming/crying (our apartment complex has a lot of families).

He is perfectly fine inside, but opening the door will cause him to become alert and retreat to the corner of the room if he hears someone. We are becoming worried as the other day he had to go pee bad and had an accident indoors. The thing is he is very well potty trained and naturally ran towards the door to go outside but ran back to the corner as we began opening the door. We have tried luring him with treats which usually takes up to an hour to even get him near the door only for him to hear a child and run back in. At that point I have had to carry him out as he is at his limit for holding everything in.

It is very sad to see him like this and we only wish we at least had a backyard so he could at least go to the bathroom. We have tried using a mat and pee pads inside for him to go, but he doesn’t really seem to understand what they are for. If anything he thinks they are a bed and tries to lay on them. No one we know has had this problem, so we are kinda stuck at what to do next.We would really appreciate any advice. Should we continue with the pee pads? Is there anything we are doing wrong trying to get him outside? Thank you in advance.
 

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I wonder if he might be in his second fear period. That can make relatively small things take on a greater significance than they otherwise would.

To make it as low stress as possible, can you maybe train him to go in and out of the door at quiet times. You may need to do that at silly o'clock but if it gets him more relaxed about going out, it will be worthwhile. I'd also spend some time letting him go out, and if he wants, straight back in. That will show him that you are listening to his fears, and if he knows that, and that he won't be pushed into doing something he isn't ready to cope with, his confidence will develop.

You will probably have to take a bit of time with this. You could also try walking at very quiet times to help him build more confidence outside.

I'm not a fan of pee pads, they are very like soft furnishings in texture and can lead to the dog thinking that other soft furnishings are for peeing on. Can you get a big, shallow tray and line it with turf, to be more similar to outside surfaces? Garden centres often have something suitable. If you have a balcony, even better.

You might also find a pheromone product helps. These come in a spray (for blankets etc., not for directly on to the dog), a collar and a diffuser. They replicate the hormone a bitch has after having puppies and have a calming effect on dogs.
 

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Considering the breed I wouldn’t be too surprised. It’s a primitive breed with well established behaviors and characteristics and instincts.

How much do you know about primitive breeds, how they work and how to train them? This isn’t a breed for anyone and you really need to know what you’re doing if getting one.

From your post it doesn’t really add up to me. Why did you choose to get a Jindo?

It’s a guard/watch and hunting dog with very strong instincts. It’s a primitive breed with all that means and differs a lot from a “normal” dog. They usually have issues with dogs and new people. Are very alert and quick to react, have a high motivation to avoid danger and fear and will act accordingly. They’re very intelligent and sharp and will learn to avoid situations they previously have experienced to be dangerous or uncomfortable. Though they are intelligent they’re not usually easy to train since they often see no reason to please others and will do what they want, when they want.

This type of breed is not for everyone and you really need to know how they work, how to handle them and what they need.
 
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