Dog Forum banner
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
I agree with the above. You have a teenager on your hands. I think it would be a good idea to stop letting him off leash for a few months in situations where recall is truly important. You don't want him getting into trouble or getting accustomed to blowing you off.

When you do have him off leash, you might be able to use some psychological tricks to nudge him into making the right decision. One is, ironically, to move away from him. You can play on his fear of missing out on fun or his fear of being abandoned. One thing I've done is to scoop up a favorite toy, furtively tuck it under my arm as though I don't want him to see I have it, and then slink away from the puppy as though I'm going to go play with the toy without him. Another thing I've done is to step out of sight and let the puppy have a few moments of panic when he realizes he has lost me. A third thing I've done is to cheerfully call "Come check it out" and then trot away as though I'm hot on the trail of a rabbit.

It's also important to try and ensure that coming to you is always a good thing for the puppy. Try to greet the puppy with a treats and a play session instead of just clipping the lead on him. Avoid calling the puppy for unpleasant things like nail clipping.

When I was a little kid most parents in my neighborhood had to call their kids several times to get them to come home at in the evening You'd hear bellows of increasing parental frustration: "Chris...Christopher...Chris, dinner....CHRISTOPHER ALTON SMITH GET YOUR TAIL INTO THIS HOUSE RIGHT NOW!" The kids all had the same evening routine: get fed, get put in the bath, get put to bed. All the kids knew that coming home meant bath, bed, and no more fun for the rest of the night. The slight lure of dinner wasn't nearly as appealing as continuing to play outside with their friends. Of course the kids dragged their heels coming home. Puppies work with the same logic, including a willingness to ignore food if something else is sufficiently appealing.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top