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my puppy is now 7 months old and recently he is becoming more and more aggressive, with everyone in my family except me.

my Puppy ( male ) is becoming aggressive with my wife and sometimes my daughter, as well as my older female dog. they are both the same breed, and she is now 5 years old and has not show one ounce of aggression since day one until last week when they were playing out in the yard.

Im not sure what my pup did but she growled and bit him to the point he actually ran away.

but ever since then ( for the last 2 week ) he is biting. its situational tho. When my wife or i come home he gets really aggressive for about 5 minutes, when my daughter is playing on her swing he tries to bite / pull her down. And playing with my older dog. Today when my wife got home from work he bit her stomach to the point that it is a deep purple bruise. no breaking of skin or blood, but a good size bruise.
He has bit me twice and drawn blood but that was when he was 2-3 months old playing on the floor. nothing since then until recently.

he has an appointment next week to get fixed so i am hoping that will calm him down.

but if anyone has any suggestions or tips, it would be greatly appreciated,
 

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How old is your daughter? What breed is the dog? Is there anything in particular that seems to trigger this (touching him, approaching him when he is in possession of something he values, when someone leans over him) or does it seem more like he is play-biting too hard? The difference between the two is huge. Puppy mouthing can get horrendously hard, but is largely caused by over excitement and poor bite inhibition. Aggression is caused by fear and is basically the dogs way of saying "Leave me alone. I will fight you if I have to." Also, play biting can be fairly hard but when a dog bites with the intent of fighting, their bites tend to get progressively more severe, each and every time.

Take a look at this page. They go over pretty much every "warning sign" of all-out aggression in dogs: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/aggression-dogs
 

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sounds like an unruly teenager. this time is always the most "fun" when they grow up.
You shoul get help from a behaviourist, that can observe how your wife acts around your dog and help her to get more assertive towards him.
Don't overreact, if you start counter training this behaviour it will get better and stop for sure.
chasing your daughter on a swing can be a rough way to play with her, but it can also be preydrive, when the child is still small.
generally keep this dog away from your child for now.

what kind of breed is he? the way how you describe him, he seems to be on the bigger side.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My daughter is 3 and my dog is an Amstaff.

Its not a, get away from me or leave me alone kind of biting. its more OMG YOURE HOME biting, and the chasing on the swing, has my daughter worried when he gets too close she tries to jump off.
I think he rips at least 3 items of clothing a week from biting when people come home.

the thing that worries me the most is when my two dogs are playing and it starts to get out of hand. The hair on both of them starts to stand straight up and you see nothing but teeth.

My older dog is very well socialized around other dogs cats and people, but my puppy is lacking scocialization skills that he should of been tought a while ago.

Another thing , he is always biting my other dog when we are giving her attention, if the attention is not 100% on him, he does not like it.
 

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is you other dog a big dog too?
I'd be worried that one day it has enough and you child accidentally ends up between them.
protect your older dog from the puppy. that's yours and your wife's job as its master.

how long does your wife train the puppy every day? since your child still is small she's probably still sat home more than you, so she is the one that can correct and train the dog easier.
perhaps she could talk with a trainer about it an they can help her how to start.

Your puppy doesn't sound aggressive to me, but he sounds not very trained and this can end up becoming real aggression if your wife doesn't start taking her role as its master.
not violent, but strict and consistent.
 
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Have his thyroid checked, hypothyroidism can cause this kind of sudden onset aggression. I also have to tell you that neutering might not help, so be prepared.

Here is a short interview with Dr Jean Dodds who is the world's leading expert on canine hypothyroidism, it explains early and late symptoms and what test the vet needs to do, a full thyroid antibody panel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_BgAshtJnk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The puppy is pure amstaff and the older dog is Amstaff american bulldog mix.

yea he is definitely getting some training classes this fall and winter when my work slows down and i have extra time
 

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How much exercise is the young guy getting per day? A good hour or two per day of brisk exercise can really take the edge off of a young dog.

I'd also recommend that you practice some time coming in and out of the house with the puppy. Remember that the biggest reward that you can give a dog is your attention and that they will basically do whatever works in order to get it. If you only pay them attention when they are sitting nicely, guess what they will default to, over time? Conversely, if they are going bonkers and you don't have things planned ahead so that you are grabbing for them, trying to get them to calm down around the little kid ASAP when you come in the door... Hey, that works for them too!

If he is super wound up when you get home and has a hard time holding it together, you may find that the best way to manage behavior is simply to proceed to the back door as quickly and quietly as possible, and let him outside where he can redirect that energy into running around and going nuts in the backyard rather than in the front hall. At least in that situation he is learning, "I won't explode if I can just hold it together for 2 minutes. We are going outside and it will be much more acceptable to be rambunctious out there than it will be in the front hall."

Also remember that practice makes perfect: The more your dog practices at jumping up and going nuts, the better he will get at it. The more he practices sitting politely, the better he gets at it. Every time a dog practices a behavior, they are reinforcing that behavior and making it stronger and more habitual! So it really pays off to be consistent.

I'd recommend that before classes, you hire a CPDT to come over and do some sessions just on your in-house greeting situation. They should be able to assess the situation by watching your routine, and come up with a bit of a plan for you on how to manage and improve your dog's habits in this situation. Should only take 1-3 sessions.

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/finding-professional-help

Here is a great overall video for impatient, out-of-control dogs:
 

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Our family Lab BC used to do a stalking thing that BCs do and we mistook it for aggression for a while. She would get low and stare at us with intent eyes and then when we moved she would run at us growling and barking and jumping up, but that's a play method common in herding breeds. We thought she was aggressive and at one point considered rehoming her.

When we learned she was just rough housing we all felt silly and trained her to play without jumping up and biting, and directing her energy into toys. She's a lovely dog today :)

What kind of things is the puppy doing exactly when he's aggressive? Aggression means fear, so I'm curious if he's showing fearful signs? He could just be overly rough. That dog I was talking about used to get snapped at all the time because she wouldn't let it go with older dogs. When you say the puppy tries to pull her off the swing, it sounds to me like he's excited about the interesting swinging the human is doing so he's jumping up and being grabby out of excitement not aggression. Wednesday, that dog, used to stand at the bottom of slides and wait to jump at people and grab their clothes. Cosmo used to bark when I was swinging and try to jump on me and bark at me.
 
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