Dog Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my dog has a recurring staph infection. It goes right underneath her fur and causes these sores/bald spots if its not caught in time. I have seen 4 different vets and one dermatologist this year. It's already cost me well over $1000 and no on seems to have an answer. All agree that it is a form of staph infection but are unsure why it continues to recur. Have tried switching her to strictly kangaroo/oatmeal based Iams dog food and it continues which pretty much rules out food allergies.

Symptoms started earlier this year around april right at the start of allergy season. Antibiotics have cleared up her staph but it comes back about two weeks after she gets off of them every time. Having seen the dermatologist and done bloodwork she said everything looks perfectly fine with her blood. She tested the skin and it isn't mange or something else. Next step is an expensive process where we test her for reaction to bee pollen and she may have to have shots the rest of her life. Currently I am 'controlling' it with Duoxo chlorhexadine spray. by controlling i mean preventing it from breaking out into all out sores but it does continue to Migrate around and this is concerning me as it has recently begun to migrate towards her backside and there are some sensitive areas back there so I may be bringing her back into the dermatologist sooner than I thought.

Guys I am really at a loss here. She seems as healthy and happy as ever and has never even noticed the skin issues on her back but that is only because I am staying on top of it. I feel like I am being led through a gauntlet of expensive procedures that do nothing. Everyone seems to think it is allergies causing her to have a reaction that manifests as a recurring staph infection. The dermatologist seems to want to rule everything else out before we go for what we both think is causing it, and I am starting to question that decision. It is about 200 dollars to even step foot into this place much less the treatments they recommend. Has anyone gone through this? any advice or recommendations? Any particular dermatologists or vets in arizona you would recommend? This is the best dog I have ever had and I am concerned about her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,929 Posts
First I would choose another food besides Iams its junk. Stay away from purina Iams and science diet, no grocery store brands. Zignature is a really high quality single protein food
Zignature® - Dry Dog Food
Second I would try baths with healing clay. The scientific studies say it will work for those hard to get rid of infections.
Medicinal clay – the latest weapon against MRSA
In a new study researchers from Arizona State University lay out the case for clay, demonstrating that certain varieties of clay have the ability to aggressively kill a range of pathogens including E. coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) – a stubborn, highly contagious, and dangerous pathogen that has lately been the scourge of many hospitals and is a common cause of skin infections in the community.
https://earthslivingclay.com/1702/heal-your-pet-naturally-with-calcium-bentonite-clay/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
The dermatologists in my area rarely hesitate to put dogs on antibiotics for extended periods of time when it comes to superficial pyoderma (Staph skin infections). Some literally put some dogs on antibiotics for life, and most do very well. Others recommend bathing with an antiseptic, antiseborrheic shampoo every 2-4 weeks, followed by leave on conditioners that often manage the conditions… less medications that way, and most do pretty well. There are always exceptions of course. In my experience most recurrent Staph infections are related to ongoing allergies (pollen being the most common) and can be good candidates for immunotherapy (which sounds like what your dermatologist has recommended)… this works about half the time in my experience… and half the time does not work well enough to be off meds for very long. Moving to a different climate works very well for many dogs (but is rarely a realistic options). My own dog was very allergic and off and on Staph infections, ear infections and constant foot licking and recurrent hot spots.. .until we moved to a high altitude in the Rockies and almost instantly was cured for over 4 years… then we moved back to California and all his allergies returned (though the 4 years away seemed to have a bit of a lasting effect as they were not as bad). I did have him on antibiotics for some time, but I am a better prescriber than I am good about keeping my own pets on medication, so I had multiple failures. Now with some good new products (such as Apoquel) for chronic itching and allergic symptoms, we are having more luck avoiding the Staph infections (still no permanent cure for most dogs).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Hello, we have a dog in our office with a constant MRSA infection and we have worked all summer to tame the condition. This is what our doctor has her on during a flare up:bath with gentle baby shampoo, then scrub with hexadane shampoo 2%. Treat inflamed spots with Otomax ear ointment, and a treatment of vanectyl p, this usually brings the inflammation way down.
I know Otomax sounds funny, but this is the reason. MRSA or in dogs it can be MRSP will become resistant over time. If you start treating with heavy duty antibiotics, and then by chance pass that virus onto a human, well that antibiotic will no longer be useful for the human. Otomax is a spot treatment only, and so far has not become resistant for the dog we are treating. This dog has had good results, but it is a life long condition that will come with flare ups.
You could talk to your vet about this treatment and see if they think it's worth a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
just to clarify that a bit… a MRSA or MRSP are, by definition, resistant already, or they would not be Methicillin Resistant Staph. These are bacteria (not viruses)… but they have an alarming ability to resist normal treatments, which is why they are a bit scary. Topical treatment, as mentioned, is highly recommended if it works (and it usually does) so FURTHER resistance is not attained by these already scary bacteria (no sense in making them 'scarier'). These bacteria, however, or no more contagious than any other Staph bacteria so are not going to infect a person or another dog any more than any other common Staph will… but IF they do infect another, it can be a tough one to control. In dogs, most resistant Staph or MRSP (Methicillin Resistant Staph pseudoepidermitus), which are far less dangerous to humans than true MRSAs (Methicillin Resistant Staph aureus), so they are far less scary … .but still require caution and handling with gloves for people with immunodeficiencies or lacerations/cuts/abrasions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
First I would choose another food besides Iams its junk. Stay away from purina Iams and science diet, no grocery store brands. Zignature is a really high quality single protein food
Zignature® - Dry Dog Food
Second I would try baths with healing clay. The scientific studies say it will work for those hard to get rid of infections.
Medicinal clay – the latest weapon against MRSA
In a new study researchers from Arizona State University lay out the case for clay, demonstrating that certain varieties of clay have the ability to aggressively kill a range of pathogens including E. coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) – a stubborn, highly contagious, and dangerous pathogen that has lately been the scourge of many hospitals and is a common cause of skin infections in the community.
https://earthslivingclay.com/1702/heal-your-pet-naturally-with-calcium-bentonite-clay/

Amazon.com: Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay Deep Pore Cleansing, 1 Pound: Beauty

is something like this what you are referring to? what do you do just apply some to the skin in the bath and then rinse it off after a few minutes?

So far i am able to control the spots from turning into full on sores with chlorhexidine shampoo and spray but it still seems to be migrating around messing up her fur.

Really do not like the idea of her being on antibiotics her whole life. Kind of scares me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Two other options for you are manuka honey, and vitamin C both are effective on MRSA. Vitamin C has been shown to cure MRSA, you would need to buy ascorbic acid or sodium ascorbate and add it to a gentle cream, and apply to the spot. Vitamin C can also be given as a supplement. The other thing I suggest is to give your dog probiotics and Transfactor to help her immune system fight the staph naturally.

MRSA Treatment When Antibiotics Fail | The Healthy Home Economist | The Healthy Home Economist

MRSA Cures

Thanks for the suggestions but how do I know I'm giving her the proper amount of things like vitamin C or that probiotic pill? She is about 17-18 pounds
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
Vitamin C dosing (internally) is a dog/person specific thing depending on many factors. In humans, the way to do it is to dose to bowel tolerance and they cut back slightly, in some individuals this can be a significant amount of Vitamin C.

I am attaching this article on vitamin C in dogs for you. Given your dog is fighting a staph infection, I would not be conservative in the amount of Vitamin C you give her.

Benefits of Vitamin C to Your Dog - Whole Dog Journal Article

Here is a comprehensive article on probiotics for dogs which should give you all the info you need:

The Benefits of Probiotics for Your Dog - Whole Dog Journal Article

Here is the info for Transfactor for dogs:

Transfer Factor for PetsÂ* Dosage
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,929 Posts
is something like this what you are referring to? what do you do just apply some to the skin in the bath and then rinse it off after a few minutes?


I would use a food grade like this instead because if it is licked off it is clean and made to ingest. I use it to clean my teeth and my dogs. It kills bacteria anywhere you put it. If you or your dog eat something that upsets your stomach you can take a tablespoon and mix in water drink it and it will settle your stomach. For the dogs just sprinkle it in the food. For a bath mix a cup into the bath. For a poultice add water and let sit for 1/2 hour then spread on the infected area. When it dries it makes its own bandage. Mix in plastic or ceramic bowl and use a wooden spoon to mix. Anything metal messes with the effectiveness.
Amazon.com : Food Grade USP -2 Pound Wyoclay Bentonite Clay Internal External Body Detox : Beauty
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top