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Hello everyone my boyfriend and I got a pup few weeks ago and he's been good, but up until recently he's become more and more aggressive. He'll attack me if I say no when jumping and such, also while having play time when he starts to play too"rough" and try ignoring and walking away he'll go for my legs. It's not just nipping it's hard biting the yelping from me only gets him more excited and I'm not sure what to do it worries me he might become too aggressive.

Another thing, I started taking him out for walks just to the corner and back but he now hates me holding his leash. It's growling barking and biting from him the whole walk.

We sometimes push him off us when he starts to get too aggressive or won't stop jumping but I really don't approve of physical punishment/hiting.

I love him, I've always wanted a doberman such beautiful dogs but I'm stuck right now. Getting rid of him is no option for me anyone know how to deal with this situation? We're getting him a trainer but until then I'd like to be able to try to manage it on our own.
 

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well Dobermänner are more than their beauty. And the most I know are pretty sensitive and easily overexcited or nervous.

I think it would be good to ask a reward-based and violence-free working trainer to help you.
generally the nipping is normal in that age. it most of the time just overexcitement and playfulness. Puppies that show serious aggression at this age are very seldom.
generally i wouldn't react with screaming/yelping or excitement/anger or other exciting behaviour when the dog is already in hyper-mode. try to stay calm, speak with a calm and quiet voice move not too fast around him.
A command for him to settle down in his place can also help.

train leash-walking in a low-stimulus area first and then move to more exciting surroundings. perhaps start in the house or the garden.
marking correct behaviour with a clicker or markerword can also help.
 

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Hello everyone my boyfriend and I got a pup few weeks ago and he's been good, but up until recently he's become more and more aggressive. He'll attack me if I say no when jumping and such, also while having play time when he starts to play too"rough" and try ignoring and walking away he'll go for my legs. It's not just nipping it's hard biting the yelping from me only gets him more excited and I'm not sure what to do it worries me he might become too aggressive.

Another thing, I started taking him out for walks just to the corner and back but he now hates me holding his leash. It's growling barking and biting from him the whole walk.

We sometimes push him off us when he starts to get too aggressive or won't stop jumping but I really don't approve of physical punishment/hiting.

I love him, I've always wanted a doberman such beautiful dogs but I'm stuck right now. Getting rid of him is no option for me anyone know how to deal with this situation? We're getting him a trainer but until then I'd like to be able to try to manage it on our own.
Well...pups certainly act like nutballs! At 3 months, it is lucky he is not yet large enough to knock you over, so definitely important to get the training started. Have you established who is boss in the house yet? I have a very dominant Elkhound (I grew up with Dobermans and Rotts and found them to have better temperaments than my little man now!) who used to display some similar behaviors when he was little.

The biting at the legs is something puppies do, it hurts terribly! However, I actually would bite my guy back or use a tiny squirt bottle filled with water. I just had to touch it to make him back off and run away. Soon he grew out of nipping at the legs.

Do you buy him enough bones? He needs things to chew all the time. This will help get some of that negative energy out. If he has something to chew, he will learn to entertain himself.

Also, rough housing is a no-no. Some breeds DO NOT respect an owner who will get on the ground and play with them. They will view you as a litter mate. This happened to my boyfriend with my dog. The puppy views him as lower on the totem pole because I will not roughhouse or entertain such foolishness that causes my dog to nip and snap. My pup STILL grabs at my BF's hand and jumps on him when he wants something. These are behaviors he does not dare do to me.

As a note...you need to be firm and stern with a Doberman. Control the food, do not let him eat until you give him a command to do so. Show that you control the resources. His aggressiveness will subside more when he realizes that bad behavior could cost him something.

At the end of the day...it's giant baby. I remember thinking Onyx hated me around the 3-6 month time period since he could be so grouchy. He was teething and it made him super unhappy. Your puppy is trying to see where he stands in the house...do not let him establish himself as #1.
 

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Mathilda offered excellent advice. There are a number of stickies available from a link at the top of this section. These especially will likely be helpful to you:

Impulse Control and Calmness
Biting, Mouthing, and Nipping
Calming Signals

For the nipping, some dogs get more excited by yelping. You might try calmly removing yourself from the environment for a moment...repeat as needed. It will take time and consistency, but he'll eventually understand the nipping ends the fun.

Please continue to avoid using physical punishment or intimidation to train your pup. It may hurt your relationship and definitely won't do anything to help it.

At three months, he's a baby puppy who is learning about the world. Your job as his person is to teach him to behave in a human world in a positive, force-free manner; prevent him from practicing undesirable behaviors; and keep him safe and out of trouble.
 

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Since the yelping when he bites gets him more excited, maybe a nip should result in a "time out." That's what I did with my puppy. It doesn't have to be for very long - twenty seconds is an eternity for them. Do it each time he nips.
 

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I think when it comes to mouthing, you have to figure out what works for that particular dog.

My Cocker mix is VERY mouthy - I tried it all: replacing my arm with a toy, yelping, etc. What I found works the best is just freezing whenever he'd put his teeth on me. It seems like it would make it even easier for him to chew on me, but actually it made my arm really boring to him - so he'd stop. He's gotten much better with the mouthing but should he ever try again I just freeze and he stops immediately and gives my hand a good lick. :)

I think a positive trainer and/or a puppy class would benefit you all. It's a good way to get off on a good foot with your little guy and they can help you find what works best for your dog.
 

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I've seen it said more than once on here that it's "okay" for dogs to growl because that's their way of warning that they are uncomfortable.

Then why isn't it okay to "growl" at an unruly puppy who is making you uncomfortable? Obviously I don't mean to imitate a dog's growl, but our human version is a firm verbal reprimand, and moving toward the dog to push him out of our space. This is what an adult dog would do to your puppy if he got too rough, and he'd comprehend that communication pretty easily. So why not do that?

I have no issue reprimanding and correcting a dog that is exhibiting rude behavior. I don't mean to beat the snot out of him, but let him know that you are not happy with his level of play/aggression. At 3 months old, you can instill in him the appropriate way to interact. Once he hits adulthood and has gotten away with bullying you for fun all that time, it might turn ugly if and when you ever try to force your hand and say "enough".

I think, just like with human children, we do them no favors by withholding discipline out of fear of them no longer "liking" us. Like I said, it doesn't have to be monumental, but pushing the dog down with a firm, "No!" and shooing him out of your space, then giving him an appropriate outlet for all of his energy (a toy, a task, whatever) seems like a balanced approach to me, and will yield results pretty quickly. I've never had a puppy/dog get rough with me because I don't tolerate it. Period. And it takes surprisingly little force to correct such behavior. Do it when they are young and they'll grow up just knowing that mauling you for fun just isn't an option.
But if you're that opposed to confronting the dog and correcting his behavior, he might not be the dog for you.
 

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I read somewhere that nipping at the backs of your legs is the dog way of saying "hey your not paying attention to me". You will see your dog do it with other dog that they are playing with as well. This is a big no-no as it could cause a fight in the dog world.

My dog is a mouther but he always lets go, we are working on learning proper behavior but it takes time.
 

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I think you are mistaking excitement for aggression, I think your puppy just really wants to play and isn't asking for attention in polite ways.

I have worked with puppies like this and one of the most helpful things is to simply start teaching and rewarding calmness. One way to do this is to sit on a chair or the floor and simply be still, most likely your puppy will try to engage you in play, so if he begins to attack your legs or hands, move out of his reach. When he stops jumping or whining to try and get your attention, treat him. Your puppy will learn that the only way to get your attention is to sit or stand attentively and quietly close to you. I did this with an 8 week old puppy who only knew to get attention by energetic jumping/nipping, within 15 minutes she was laying at my feet and calmly accepting treats.

I think you should also try to get him lots of playtime with other dogs. I find that pups will learn what is/isn't ok in regards to mouthing, asking to play, and attention-seeking behaviors, much faster and more effectively in homes that already have an adult dog.
 

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Pax was like this! It seems that the only thing that worked was patience and time outs away from hands and feet when he became too rough. He's still mouthy, but not nearly as bad anymore.
 
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