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So heres the scoop. We have a 19 mo old child and a 3 year old child. We also have 2 cats that are indoor/outdoor, a bearded dragon, recently for christmas my daughter got a hamster, and one dog. Our dog is a 3 year old rescue that has discoid lupus ( in remission ). For about 4 mo i have been doing research on dog breeds and i have decided that a beagle seems to fit our familys needs. Small, intelligent ( stubborn i know), great with children. I want a puppy...who doesn't love puppies. Our 3 yr old daughter has also been asking. I think a puppy could begin to help with teaching responsibility, it will get us out and moving, it would be companionship for our other dog and us. I am home 4 days a week and when my husband isnt home my mother is here with my children and she has agreed to care for a puppy. My husbands concerns is barking alot, mess, and inability to housebreak. Oppinions?
 

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So heres the scoop. We have a 19 mo old child and a 3 year old child. We also have 2 cats that are indoor/outdoor, a bearded dragon, recently for christmas my daughter got a hamster, and one dog. Our dog is a 3 year old rescue that has discoid lupus ( in remission ). For about 4 mo i have been doing research on dog breeds and i have decided that a beagle seems to fit our familys needs. Small, intelligent ( stubborn i know), great with children. I want a puppy...who doesn't love puppies. Our 3 yr old daughter has also been asking. I think a puppy could begin to help with teaching responsibility, it will get us out and moving, it would be companionship for our other dog and us. I am home 4 days a week and when my husband isnt home my mother is here with my children and she has agreed to care for a puppy. My husbands concerns is barking alot, mess, and inability to housebreak. Oppinions?
Having an 19mo and a 3yo is already alot of work, and very expensive. Lets be real, it may be your daughter's hamster but no 3yo is actually caring for a hamster in any real way. You have a sick dog and a lizard that's high maintenance. My husband and I make good money, but we couldn't afford a sick dog (even with pet insurance) never mind a lizard that will eventually need a 100 gallon tank and a hamster who's bedding needs to be changed every other day, double litter box duty AND two toddlers AND 4 days off a week. Perhaps you have more money but seriously--save it.

Adding a puppy dosn't sound like a very good idea. Your 3yo is not going to learn any more responsibility for anything by having a 2nd dog that she isn't already "learning" from a rodent, lizard, sick dog, cats and baby sibiling. Give it a few more years when she reaches 7 or 8 if you want it to help to teach her, but even at that age don't expect much in the way of her actually caring for the animal.
 

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I will agree with the consensus, for many reasons. You have a house full of people and animals already. It is not time for a puppy. And a Beagle right now will likely want to (or successfully) eat your daughter's hamster. While I think it's great and important to involve children in pet care as early as possible, your daughter can't actually...do anything all that helpful for the dog. In my experience "chores" done by kids that age are really just creating more chores for the parents. Like someone else said, feeding a hamster and helping clean its cage is probably the most a child that age can do, if she's even doing that. And if you want her to help with dog care, surely she can help with the other dog in ways she can? Maybe you can even say she has to prove she can help care for this one before you get a new puppy.

Getting another dog is also banking on the idea that your current dog will get along with it. Some dogs don't like puppies, or any other dogs. Your dog is ill, and while I don't know what that condition affects, it might not be a dog who is eager for a puppy to dance on his head and steal his toys. Puppies are also expensive, and in the event your dog's flares up again, you want to make sure you have enough money to cover his medical bills.

On top of that, puppies bite, hard. If you get a dog you are almost guaranteeing that both your toddlers will have bites and scratches that draw blood, just because it's another teething baby that's not totally sure of his/her own strength or how to control enthusiasm. I also agree with your husband that there will be a lot of mess, housebreaking to deal with, training and more that are just normal puppy issues. And if you get a Beagle (and when the time comes, I do think they are great dogs!), you have to enjoy the sound of the Beagle bay...which most people do not. And the puppy will "get you out more"? Well, the only thing I don't understand about that is how your other dog doesn't do that? I mean unless he is so infirmed (and you said he's in remission) that he can't go on walks, how would that be different?

All in all, it's not the right time. Wait maybe two years and revisit this idea, and I hope you come talk to us again when the time is right. :)
 

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We have defiantly Decided not to get a puppy....first of all I would like to explain my dogs condition.
Discoid lupus is a skin condition that can cause ulcers on the nose and ears. Currently he is in remission and generally he only needs antibiotics and steroids once a year or less.

We are considering an adult dog...well kind of an adult. A 10 mo old rescue beagle....I prefer rescue!
 

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And the getting us out more....our dog can't be in direct sunlight between 11am and 4pm...the sun can cause a flair up. So he can't go on hikes, to the park, ect. We play ball in the yard in the early morning and afternoon and we go for walks at those times as well
 

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And the getting us out more....our dog can't be in direct sunlight between 11am and 4pm...the sun can cause a flair up. So he can't go on hikes, to the park, ect. We play ball in the yard in the early morning and afternoon and we go for walks at those times as well
Ah ok, that clears that up. Well your dog's condition sounds pretty unpleasant. However I do want to ask if you've seen him interact with other dogs much? That's obviously a concern anytime you're looking to add another dog to the home but your dog would be extra sensitive to what would be normal play or even "getting to know you" dog behavior of sniffing the ears and face. If this new dog sniffed or licked him on a sore spot, that might turn into a squabble.

Eh, 10 month old isn't quite an adult. That's kind of like adopting a 14 year old kid. But I think considering your situation you should try a trial period with this dog. And my concerns of a Beagle eating/trying to eat your daughter's hamster are even more likely if this dog is an adolescent and never grown up around them. So you would have to keep them separated and explain this to your daughter--which honestly, might be the hardest part. I imagine she would want to "introduce" the pets together. But, I've heard of crazier situations working. Just BE sure that all the family members (human and otherwise) are ok with this new potential dog coming in. Let us know how it goes.
 
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never mind a lizard that will eventually need a 100 gallon tank and a hamster who's bedding needs to be changed every other day,
I bearded dragons doesn't need a 100 gallon tank. A 40 gallon breeder tank works great for them, or a custom cage. There are also manufacturers for reptile cages that work much better than a glass tank. My beardie lives in a cage I made out of a table. And hamster cages do not need to cleaned every other day. My rats get cleaned out every five days. One hamster in an appropriate sized cage would need to be cleaned once a week or so. If they are kept in a tiny cage maybe ever four or five days. Other than that I do agree it is probably not the best time to be bringing in a puppy into your home.
 
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I bearded dragons doesn't need a 100 gallon tank. A 40 gallon breeder tank works great for them, or a custom cage. There are also manufacturers for reptile cages that work much better than a glass tank. My beardie lives in a cage I made out of a table. And hamster cages do not need to cleaned every other day. My rats get cleaned out every five days. One hamster in an appropriate sized cage would need to be cleaned once a week or so. If they are kept in a tiny cage maybe ever four or five days. Other than that I do agree it is probably not the best time to be bringing in a puppy into your home.

My friend is very passionate about reptiles and had a bearded dragon. She probably went overboard, so that's where I get my idea, because she was very sensitive to the fact that lizards are often left in cages that are far, far too small. No one would put a teacup chiowa in a 10 gallon tank, but they think it's acceptable to put a lizard in one. I have a bit of her passion as you can see.

AS far as hamster. It does depend on the cage size, I suppose, but with a small child and the poop/pee smell I wouldn't go a week. Fecal matter can be dangerous to those under 2, and I know when I was nannying and had a hamster I'd wash the cage out far more frequently than "normal" simply because I was very cautious about what got on the hampster's paws and thusly on the child's hands (an inevitably in the mouth/eyes)
 

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Most young dogs admitted to shelters are admitted because they hit doggie adolescence and their owners can't deal with them, that doesn't necessarily mean that they are "bad dogs" just that they will be in need of immediate training to be a good addition to the family.

I am not saying don't do it, only you truly know what you can handle. I would never tell a mother with 2 kids not to have another baby, and a puppy is about as much work as a baby. Also when your home is well child proofed, it is pretty much puppy proofed (apart from kids toys over the floor for dog to chew!)

BUT be really really aware of hazards, like dogs and kids on stairs at the same time, jumping, claws, accidental bites. We had one incident with my dog and my son, it was an accident, but there was a lot of blood (my son's) and it wasn't pleasant. Also be aware of the size of dog you get, too big and your children could get hurt by the dog jumping on them and too small and the dog could be hurt by the children jumping on him.

Have a way to separate all of them, kids/dogs/other animals. You will need to be able to safely go to the bathroom/do things around the house without pandemonium breaking out, and yes you will probably find yourself sitting in the bathroom with the puppy and one of the children in with you (been there done that).

You are probably used to walking with one hand on each child, one on the leash, one pushing the stroller, one picking up the poop, and yes you will need to grow another hand. I am guessing your first dog is used to walking with the leash clipped to the handle of a stroller. When we had our first dog and I used to walk a friends dog too, I would have one child in the stroller, the other on a board behind it, but he could get off an rund around if he wanted, and yes he had a leash too! The dogs would be clipped on each side of the stroller, and funnily enough it is easier to train a dog to walk next to a stroller (for me) than it is to just train a dog to walk.

Good luck whatever you decide!
 

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My friend is very passionate about reptiles and had a bearded dragon. She probably went overboard, so that's where I get my idea, because she was very sensitive to the fact that lizards are often left in cages that are far, far too small. No one would put a teacup chiowa in a 10 gallon tank, but they think it's acceptable to put a lizard in one. I have a bit of her passion as you can see.

AS far as hamster. It does depend on the cage size, I suppose, but with a small child and the poop/pee smell I wouldn't go a week. Fecal matter can be dangerous to those under 2, and I know when I was nannying and had a hamster I'd wash the cage out far more frequently than "normal" simply because I was very cautious about what got on the hampster's paws and thusly on the child's hands (an inevitably in the mouth/eyes)
I agree most people put small animals and reptiles in cages that are way too small. The thing with reptiles is that most are not as active as mammals. So it's hard to compare the two. I've always had reptiles and small animals and still do. I actually will make my own cages because you can't always find a good sized one for a reasonable price. My guinea pigs have a two level cage that is close to six feet long.

The cage cleaning thing is subjective to a point. I've had small animals since I was 10, I've taken care of them myself. Doing all the cleaning and feeding. I've never been worried about germs, even though I do have an autoimmune disease. I rarely get sick and all my cuts heal quickly and without problem. I've also never noticed a smell to the cages after five days. One little hamster doesn't make much mess. But if it makes you feel better to clean cages every other day, no harm. But it's not necessary unless you have multiple animals in a small cage.
 

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We have defiantly Decided not to get a puppy....first of all I would like to explain my dogs condition.
Discoid lupus is a skin condition that can cause ulcers on the nose and ears. Currently he is in remission and generally he only needs antibiotics and steroids once a year or less.

We are considering an adult dog...well kind of an adult. A 10 mo old rescue beagle....I prefer rescue!
We adopted a 10mos old Cattle Dog mix last summer and while I love her to death, if I had truly known what life was going to be like I would have not gotten a second dog. Or at least, not a dog at that age. She came to us totally untrained, and it's been a challenge trying to get her to a point where she's a "good" dog. It's even more challenging trying to do it with another dog in the house who has been used to having all the attention the last 5 years.

Just from my experience, I couldn't imagine having her as well as two small children and a menagerie of other pets. I think I would definitely go crazy and have panic attacks daily, lol.
 

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This dog has actually been housed at a foster home with a no kill shelter since 5 weeks old. The rescue owner was going to keep her but suffered a back injury and is no longer able to walk her. She is fully house broken. We spend about 40 minutes with her yesterday and she is extremely gentle and sweet, however will run off leash
Actually our dog now is not leashed on walks, he never leaves my side. Our bearded dragon is in his forever tank...a 40 gallon breeder. My daughters hamster is in her room high upon a dresser with a small lock on the cage, so she can't get him out without us. We do clean his cage once a week, and the cat litter box is automatic and gets cleaned a few times a week. If we do decide to adopt this dog we are going to do it on a foster care contract, so we will foster for a few weeks then adopt if all goes well.
 

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Sounds like the best plan possible for your family getting a new dog. Make sure to let us know how it goes!
 

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Before I read your post, I was going to recommend that you work with a rescue group that fosters their dogs and arrange for a trial period. You beat me to it!

I hope this new dog works out well for your family. Good luck!
 
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