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My dog, Hannah, almost died last week after, i believe, ingesting something unknown. Had diarrhea and vomited everywhere. Brought her to the hospital and found out she had pancreatitis. She stayed for 6 days on IVs, but she would not eat anything until just recently, thank God!

She’s has had Cushing’s disease for about 2 years now and she’s had high blood pressure for about 6 months, both that she’s on medication for.

The tricky part that I need help with is she also now has kidney disease. Was prescribed a low protein diet with Royal Canin, but she doesn’t eat it at all.. she use to until a couple days before this pancreatitis episode happened and now she’s completely turned off from it. She’s become a VERY picky eater lately. The main ingredient in the Royal Canin is corn too.. that doesn’t sound too healthy to me.

So I’m officially going to be taking over making her meals with everything she needs because I want to turn this around. She was just a happy cheerful dog a week ago, and now it’s like the life is taken out of her right now.

I know it will take some time to bounce back, but I need to get her started on a well balanced diet that she will eat. i’m a chef so i know i can make something delicious for her but i don’t know what she needs or what vegetables she may find appetizing.. I know that’s much to ask for, but if anyone has ever had or known of a similar experience with a Bichon I would love to hear any input.

I don’t know yet if she has high phosphorus levels in her blood, but with kidneys reaching danger levels that is pretty likely right? Would anyone suggest just adding the correct amounts of calcium carbonate into the diet or should I get her prescribed on phosphorus binders?

This is almost an urgent matter until I may have to make the tough decision..

Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Hi I work at a pet store and work with a decent amount of customers who’s dogs have pancreatitis and or kidney disease.

Ideally, if you can do raw, that is most optimal. The raw enzymes help the pancreas use the enzymes instead of stopping the pancreas. Brands like Steve’s and Vital Essentials are excellent raws that use lots organ meat. Talk to a local pet store and see what raw foods they have.

If not raw then freeze dried is next. Freeze dried is the next freshest food for dogs. It’s easier to digest than kibble. And keep in mind when looking at the gaurenteed analysis that is doesn’t have moisture in it. Once you add moisture the levels or protein and fat will go down.

Feed raw pancreas if possible! Likes seem to help likes. I’ve seen many successes in feeding dogs with pancreatitis pancreas. However, raw pancreas is hard to come by since it had a short shelf life.

next is a dehydrated food. Many customers who don’t want to switch to raw or freeze dried or who can’t afford it use a dehydrated meal. I’ve had some successes with The Honest Kitchen Dehydrated Grain Free Fish, Duck, and Turkey recipes.

For proteins try to stick to neutral or cooling proteins. This comes from old Chinese medicine. Cooling proteins can help reduce inflammation. Warming proteins are like chicken, goat, lamb, kangaroo, etc... I would stay away from these as they can further increase inflammation.

Watch Dr. Karen Becker’s pancreatitis videos on YouTube. She is super informative and I watch her videos a lot of information.

Here’s some links talking about pancreatitis:



 

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I would get off Royal Canin as soon as possible. Yes it does have science behind it. But so does Gatorade. Gatorade had a huge hype because of the electrolytes in it. But if also had tons of sugar and sodium.
 

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Our 11 year old, poodle/bischon mix has pancreatitis, as well as an autoimmune disorder. The autoimmune disorder is currently in full remission, but we do give her maintenance medication to maintain that. We tried taking her off, but she relapsed. As far as the pancreatitis, we feed all fresh, lightly cooked, everything USDA certified for human consumption, and only low fat foods, such as chicken, turkey, fish, all with fruits, vegetables, and organ meat, usually liver. She is, fortunately an enthusiastic eater, but when she does balk, we find that wetting her food with either chicken or beef broth seems to make it more palatable for her. One of her favorite snacks is a little rice with broth over it. Right now she is doing well, though her health has really been kind of tenuous for probably the past four years of so. She is a happy dog and loves life, so we keep doing whatever treatments her team of Vets prescribe.
 
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