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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. I’m new here. We’ve been to the vet and it was gastroenterologist and possibly pancreatitis. Finished meds. She’s stopping eating again. Of course I’ll be discussing with the vet tomorrow but she’s a 5 lb yorkie and 13.

she is slowly losing weight. I’m going to discuss with the vet but when do we stop doing this. I won’t let her slowly starve. The vet bills have been adding up. Just hoping some advice as far as when you stop.
 

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Poor girl and poor you. Crying and wobbly don't sound good. What are your options if she takes a sudden turn for the worse? A lot of vet clinics and emergency hospitals are running short staffed right now, and wait times can be crazy. Last year we took our senior boy in a few days earlier than we would have otherwise, because we didn't want to risk him having a terrible crisis with no pain meds to ease his passing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Our vet is walk in. I can always pay for an emergency. It’s a smaller town and the vet just increased size. I got her to eat with some probiotics but it’s a temp win. We’ll see how she does over the next few weeks and I’ll be discussing it with the vet so we have a plan.
 

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Is she wobbly because she isn't eating, or is she wobbly even when she eats? I'm trying to understand whether getting her diet sorted out would improve her quality of life and if so, by how much.
 

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Ours is thirteen and is an on again off again eater. She has pancreatitis, now under control, gastritis, colitis, and has failing kidneys, so I really know what you mean when you say Vet bills are mounting. Our Vet prescribes some appetite stimulant medication, which helps, doesn't solve the problem, and in attempts to mitigate weight loss, we pretty much give her whatever she will eat. Sometimes thats freshly prepared dog food, nothing processed, sometimes it means giving her some of our food. Vet says, we can't let her starve, so give her what she will eat. Right now for the past few weeks, she is in a good place, eating fairly well, and has actually put a little weight on, but its a cycle with her, and probably yours too. We went for a pretty good walk, she and I, this morning, and because she is in an eating cycle, is stronger and steadier, but we went though a cycle, where she could barely walk, and fell off her steps, to get onto our bed. Its heartbreaking to watch them go downhill like that. Fortunately we have a great Vet, who works with us to keep her quality of life up.
 

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When they stop eating, it's the clear sign for me. It has been in dogs, cats, and horses.
Actually, although that is commonly believed, I don't think it is true at all.
It is true in some cases, but I don't think it should be taken as the certain sign, or even as any sign except a sign that something's wrong.

A dog or cat or horse or human being or anyone can stop eating for a thousand different reasons, at any age, including old age. The first thing is to do one's best to find out why this is happening, because it can be something that can be treated and fixed.

I have had dogs and cats stop eating ( in old age) and it did not mean it was the end of their life. If I had thought that it did and had had those dogs and cats euthanized I would have cheated them and me out of years of life, love, and happiness.
 

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Actually, although that is commonly believed, I don't think it is true at all.
It is true in some cases, but I don't think it should be taken as the certain sign, or even as any sign except a sign that something's wrong.

A dog or cat or horse or human being or anyone can stop eating for a thousand different reasons, at any age, including old age. The first thing is to do one's best to find out why this is happening, because it can be something that can be treated and fixed.

I have had dogs and cats stop eating ( in old age) and it did not mean it was the end of their life. If I had thought that it did and had had those dogs and cats euthanized I would have cheated them and me out of years of life, love, and happiness.
Very true, as I said in an earlier post, ours has been an on again off again eater for over a year, or more, and she is still trucking along. This is where working with a 'GOOD' Vet is important. Our Vet monitors her closely, at least monthly, sometimes weekly depending on how she is doing, and is very tuned into her quality of life. Although she will never again be a young dog, she still loves life and living, and continues to be fascinated, by things going on in her world. As long as her quality of life remains, so that she can enjoy living, we will continue to do everything possible to keep her going.
 

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Actually, although that is commonly believed, I don't think it is true at all.
It is true in some cases, but I don't think it should be taken as the certain sign, or even as any sign except a sign that something's wrong.
All right, I should have expanded -- if I have an older animal whose condition is already making me wonder if it's time, and they stop eating, not a meal or two, but stop, I take that as a final sign. It probably makes a difference that I've always had dogs who are voracious eaters, not picky and off and on again in their healthy years. And I will add that I don't believe in dragging out final illnesses. I've done that in the past and regret it. Treating illness, yes, dragging out the final days because I don't want to face what needs to be faced, no.
 
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