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Hi,

So in a couple of weeks I'll be picking up my first puppy (I've had older rescues before, but never a Puppy). He's a Miniature Dachshund. We did a lot of reading, talked to people etc before we made the choice. We then went about finding a breeder etc. But when it all came about (litter born and puppy picked) it turned out we'd booked (COVID rebooked and rebooked) to be away 3 days after we could have taken him home. I didn't want to pick up a puppy just to throw him in the deep end of a family holiday or palm him off on a sitter. So now he's going to be just over 11 weeks old when we get him home.

But here's the thing. Obviously I'm excited and have been doing a lot more reading and research even though I'm on holiday. My plan had always been to use a puppy training plan, but every puppy training plan I've seen is from 8 weeks. Initially I'd hoped to just start the training plan as soon as he came home and ignore the fact he's 3 weeks older. But now I seen some stuff that seems to say there are certain parts of training that can only happen at 8 weeks (or 9 or 10). Or if you don't have "this thing" cracked by 12 weeks or whatever it never will etc. You get the idea.

So I guess what I'm asking is, can I use a puppy training plan even if it starts at "8 weeks"? Is there anything I need to do given he'll be 11 weeks? Are the things I've seen right? Will training him properly be next to impossible due to the delay?

Any thoughts welcome. But be kind please.
 

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Training him properly won't be ruined. Puppies don't read the puppy plan! Seriously, it's a good to have a guideline and milestone markers but it won't matter an awful lot if you start a little late. What is important is that his brain physiology changes at around 16 weeks and it is helpful for him to have exposure to as many things as possible in that period - things he is likely to encounter during his life; so elephants aren't as important as fire engines if you know what I mean.

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You could also ask his breeder to start with some things, if they are decent, they should be happy to.

And pictures are always appreciated here ...
 

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A good breeder will be handling and socializing puppies from birth onwards. You are not alone in bringing home an older puppy. While large breed puppies typically go home at 8 or 9 weeks, it's quite common for toy puppies to stay with the breeder until 11 or 12 weeks. The reason is that very small puppies have trouble regulating their body temperature and blood sugar: it's better for tiny puppies to stay with their mother under the supervision of their breeder until they have gained a bit more body mass. These older puppies turn out just fine when they come from a breeder who is doing things properly. It sounds like you did some research and aren't just giving your cash to a broker shipping puppies in from the continent. I think you'll be fine.
 

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Care to share the puppy training plan you found? Some are better than others...

Whether a puppy or dog is 8 wks or 8 yrs, the first order of business is to allow them time to settle in and learn their new environment.

Of course with little puppies that includes potty training. Take time to just "be" with your puppy, while being mindful not to try to train them right away. You have as much to learn about them as they do about you and their new home!
 

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I thought that too. I just didn't know if it would be rude to ask.

I'll ask next time we talk..we're due a facetime with Remus tomorrow.
Most good breeders get a puppy ready for its new family as a matter of course. Included would baths, a brushing and and a nail clip at the least; and I doubt that a good breeder would consider that request rude at all.
 

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It's already been said, but I've had puppies come to me 8-11 weeks, and there was little difference in the training end product besides the older puppies having better bladder control for the most part.
 

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Congrats on the new pup! What a cutie!

Potty training: just never let 'em out of your sight until they're completely reliable.

A few years back I adopted a dachshund named Dudley (rip); an older sweet boy, but he wasn't really potty trained. So he couldn't have free reign of the house. He had to stay with me so I could keep an eye out for his naughty shenanigans.
 
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