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My husband and I just rescued a 1 year old dog from a rescue organization. We were told this pup was fully potty trained with her previous owner. Unfortunately, her foster parents let her roam a 10 acre ranch for the 3-4 weeks leading up to time we adopted her. (unaware of this until adoption day). We fear she has regressed on the potty training at the ranch.
When we take her outside, she eventually pees and sometimes poops, but it takes forever. Probably anywhere from 10-30 minutes depending on the time of day.
The first night home, she peed in the house. We figured it was just anxiety, not knowing the layout of our house yet, etc. But she's had several accidents since then.
Tonight we found her pooping in the house.
We've had her a little over a week, and we feel overwhelmed and in over our heads; as we had expectations of bringing home a fully house trained dog.
It seems she knows to pee outside, and eventually does her business when she's out there, but she does not alert us when she needs to go outside.
Any tips on getting her to alert us that she needs to go out?
Also, any tips on getting her to associate "go potty" to going outside to do her business, not just go outside and roam and play?

Thanks guys,
Love two overwhelmed dog parents who really want to work out this issue❤
 

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Just treat her like a puppy.

Toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

Ideally you want her to not be in a position where she needs to toilet before you have her outdoors, so that every toilet is outside - as far as possible, there will be accidents! So set her up to succeed by taking her out even more than she needs; for example every hour or 90 minutes and always after sleeping, eating, playing. Your aim is to have her outside before she cannot hold her toilet. Don't expect her to alert you, be proactive.

When she toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward her with a high value treat. Do that immediately, don't make her come to you for the treat so she is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that she wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until she is outside.

As she is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words she can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when she is reliably trained you can use these to tell her when you want her to toilet.

If you take her out and she doesn't toilet after five minutes, bring her in but don't take your eyes off her. Any hint of a toilet inside, scoop her up and get her out fast. If she doesn't try to toilet indoors (great!) take her out a second time and repeat until you do get outside toilets. You need the outside toilet to happen SO that you can reward SO that she learns.

If she has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed she may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if she needs to toilet (by going off and toileting out of sight) - the opposite of what you want. Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at them TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. Take a rolled up newspaper and hit yourself over the head for not having taken her outside in time. Not when she is there though in case you scare her. Then clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract her back to the spot.

Indoors if you see her circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get her out fast.
 

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Take a moment to breathe, and consider what your new pup has been through, being rehomed is very stressful/hard on them, and it takes time for them adjust, to settle in to a new routine, a new life, to get to know you and become comfortable in their new home. Some dogs settle in quickly, others take a little (or a lot) more time, patience and understanding is key.
While she may have been house trained in her previous home, but right now, she needs the opportunity (and your help) to re-learn those skills at your house. I would expect she is going through a lot of anxiety and confusion, which makes it difficult for them to think or learn, and trying hard to figure out how things are supposed to work. (We don't function well when we are stressed or anxious (think about what it is like to start a new job - it is stressful, mistakes are made despite your skills but in time, things work out) dogs are no different.)
While indeed it is disappointing that she is having accidents, (despite what you were told) ensuring that you are rewarding her for going in the right place, regardless how long it takes, (once she is more settled in, relaxed, it will likely not take quite so long for her to get down to business, and you can put it on cue) can make a big difference even for an older dog.
I suspect, with patience and understanding (on your part), keep in mind that right now everything is still very new to her, and with some time to settle in things will work out just fine.
 

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I trained my dog by giving her treats each time she pees outside/ asks to go outside. That will make the dog want to pee outside and will create trust between you at the same time. If you shout at him/her when she pees in the house, it will just make the dog afraid of you. So I recommend using treats.
 

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Just treat her like a puppy.

So set her up to succeed by taking her out even more than she needs; for example every hour or 90 minutes and always after sleeping, eating, playing. Your aim is to have her outside before she cannot hold her toilet. Don't expect her to alert you, be proactive.....
Indoors if you see her circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get her out fast.
This^^^
It's a challenge and requires a lot of watching at first (like a hawk), but worth it in the longterm, she will understand to only go outside soon enough.

Just like any puppy when learning to toilet outside, they have to be taught (brought out every 90 mins) for every new location inside to let them know they will always have the chance to potty outside. Eventually if the outside door is easily accesible you can watch for cues from her telling you she needs to potty, but she won't know until you show her.
 
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