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Our 1.5 year old Jack mix still tries my nerves, but I have to admit, he has made great strides, especially in the environment he is in. He can be out of his crate for a good amount of the day and not chew things or get into things he shouldn't, but is still happily crated off and on. He does wind down and is a big cuddler at night on the couch and sleeps with one of us. He is the type that wants to be as close to you as possible.

He's mostly past the puppy stage, but has non stop energy, obviously, which we are not surprised by. I do like it a fair amount of the time and enjoy running and playing with him. But it can get to be a bit much when it's non stop.

He is ball obsessed. You know the Chinese water torture? Well, the bump, bumpbumpbump of him dropping his ball at me feet constantly is a close second. He focuses solely on the ball, and will literally play for hours if he could. So this is something we do with him during the day many, many times, both inside and out.

On my days off, if I am trying to get any office work done or anything that is not physical, he is demanding of my attention. If I'm on the phone or laptop or tablet, he is weaseling his way into my space, dropping his ball, chasing me back and forth, practically non stop. Sometimes, completely non stop. Sometimes, he'll drop or push his ball somewhere he can't get to, then bark and bark til I get it for him. Makes it hard to concentrate.

He does "stop" occasionally, laying in a bed or on the back of the couch. I didn't think he ever would, so I am hopeful as he gets older that increases.

We have not done things perfectly with him. My husband is a complete pushover and does not discipline at all. He actually encourages bad behavior if I'm not "barking" at him (pun intended) such as letting the dog jump, stand on him, push into his space, etc. So, there's that losing battle that I've given up on for my sanity's sake. I still do some of his commands with him, but probably not as much as I should. He gets so excited to play that his focus is not great.

He gets walked daily, played with during the day at different times outside and in, and has another older dog that he plays with off and on all day. I have treat balls that I'll fill and let him chase around which occupies him for a fair amount of time. But man, his energy can be non-stop, and there are times I just need to concentrate and pay a bill or two!

I guess I just feel bad that he drives me nuts sometimes, and it helps to know I'm not alone. He is a sweetie, not perfect, but, he makes me smile every day. I've never had a dog with SO much energy, altho he is not our first terrier (love them). It's normal to feel this way, right?
 

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If he's comfortable, I would use his crate when you need some time to get things done. Put him in there with a toy or chew/kong and leave him for a couple hours.

I'm not too sure how to deal with the ball obsession and some people here will probably have a better idea on how to deal with it. But my initial gut reaction would be to take the ball away and only introduce it when you're ready to play. When you're not playing with him the ball is put away out of sight. I'm going to guess this will be a uphill battle at the beginning. Probably lots of whining and barking, but If you stick with it, you should see a difference.

I'm guessing that you eventually give in to his bothering and play which is reinforcing his obsessive behaviour.
 

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You could look into those automatic ball throwing toys that the dogs drop the ball into. I don't think I'd leave it out all the time, he may not stop and just keep going and going. But it could help to keep him occupied. I've thought about them for my girl, but she is more into tugging than balls.
 

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I would simply take the ball away if you don't want to play. My JRT mix would also play ball forever if allowed, so i only give it to her when i want her to play with it. I would try crating him when you need to get things done and teaching him to settle down. Eventually he'll learn and settle without the crate. He doesn't need attention 24/7 and needs to learn to have an off switch.
 

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I've had 2 ball obsessed dogs, and each has had to learn that there is a "not now" when it comes to playing fetch. For both of them, if they harass me with the ball and I don't want to play, I just take it and put it up. They key is to put it someplace where there's no chance they're getting it, and they can't see or easily obsess over it. They did have to learn a "signal" that the ball- and game of bothering me with it- was gone indefinitely, I use "that's all" (and "off", their leave it, if they're trying to get to it still). It took Bus less time than Annie, but he's a softer dog. Annie would persist in pestering me for a good while, but with consistency, eventually learned that I meant it. Sometimes if they're super riled up about something, or bursting at the seams with energy, they would/will continue to bring me different toys, and I just take those and put them up too. There were times when we'd empty the entire toy box, but not usually these days. If they were too obnoxious, I'd put them in a sit/stay, or on a tiedown with a bone/chew for a bit, then play with them when I had a chance to wear them out a bit.

If they're playing with the ball and it gets stuck once (mine bark, scratch, whine, etc too), I'll get it out, if it happens repeatedly (Annie used to always get the tennis balls stuck under the couch), it goes up. They eventually learn to stop getting it into those spots, give up, or get it out themselves quietly, and even if for some reason they don't, it doesn't bother me after the first time.

I wouldn't worry too much about your husband letting him be obnoxious, he can still learn that other people don't want that. Dogs are pretty smart, so if you consistently enforce the rules around yourself and others, he'll figure out that your husband is the exception :)

His eagerness to play is actually a great asset for training, and you can use a combination of both to help wear him out and control his busyness throughout the day. Use play as a reward, and ask him to do stuff throughout the day for tosses of the ball (ie: "sit". throw ball. "down". throw ball). For example, you could eventually have him sit/stay while you are on the phone or doing paperwork for 5 minutes, then have 5 minutes of playing ball, etc. Eventually, as he becomes more accustomed to the idea of relaxing nearby while you work, you could extend that even longer. I take my dog Bus to work with me most days, where he's kenneled except brief walks to "go". On days that I'm doing inventory work I'll sometimes get him out and put him in a stay on a rug in the room I'm working in. He may lay there for 10 minutes, or he may lay there for an hour. Sometimes I give him a chew, other times he's just there to enjoy a change of scenery. I usually follow that up when I'm done with a quick walk or a couple throws of his ball, just to reward him for being good.

You might try using a tie down for times when you want him to just hang out near you, give him a nice bed and a bone, and he'll get the idea pretty quickly. You might also look into the Manners Minder, or I think it's now called the Treat and Train. I have one, and it's pretty much made for this sort of thing (teaching obnoxious dogs how to chill without someone hovering over them). It's a feeding/treating station that has a remote to trigger it to dispense. It also has a "downstay" mode which will dispense treats or food at regular intervals for 3 minutes or so. I use the targeting stick that came with mine on days I don't feel like exercising dogs to give them something to do, target at one end of the house, feeder at the other. It takes a little bit of training to use, but not much, and I bet your dog would figure it out quickly.
 
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