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Should I rehouse my puppy?

This is a discussion on Should I rehouse my puppy? within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; Originally Posted by sensiblesoap As for the "do you really want to add to those statistics", if I decide that I don't want him anymore, ...

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Old 04-15-2014, 01:57 PM
  #11
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As for the "do you really want to add to those statistics", if I decide that I don't want him anymore, I will find him a home myself. Family, friends, friends of family, whatever. I will personally see to it that he has a home if I give him away. So there's no concern about finding a no-kill shelter or contributing to "statistics".

And for the expenses thing, my grandparents have covered most of it, other than the adoption fee, which I payed. I'm sure they will continue to do that. However, I cannot afford a bigger crate for him, and he's growing at the speed of light. His crate is too small, and my grandpa has said that he isn't going to buy him a new one, which isn't fair to the dog.

I know that him being a puppy is just a stage, but also I'm simply tired of taking care of him, too. Which, I can just feel some of you ready to pounce on me, but I'm being honest. I'm tired of the responsibility. I did research on the responsibility before I got the dog, and I thought I was ready, but no amount of research can prepare you for the real deal.

Also, I do know myself enough that, even if I promise I'll step up to the plate and start walking him regularly and whatnot, that I will end up not doing that. Or doing it for two days and then not doing it anymore. I know myself enough to know that that's exactly what I will do.

Again, I don't mean to be all parenty, but if you are already admitting this, I would find a new home for him. You maybe could handle an adult dog later on, but a teenager raising a puppy is a baby raising a baby. If you are already admitting you can't handle him as a baby, he will only get more difficult at 5-6 months. Puppies at 2-3 months are a pain to potty train and with biting, but they sleep. Pups in adolescence BOUNCE OFF THE WALLS. And many have the same problems with biting and some are still not reliable with potty training. Until the first year or two are over, you're going to have to put in the energy and time.

If you know that you can't give him what he needs, please don't be selfish. Adopt an older dog who needs a home when YOU are older and can handle the responsibility. Once you have a few years of the real world under your belt, you'll get how it is to have to put everything else before yourself. It's learning to be less selfish. All part of growing up.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:04 PM
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I have to disagree with you blakeandsam. I've known quite a few teens who are very responsible and trustworthy with their pets. Teenagers aren't babies. I've even known some teens who got pregnant and raised their children responsibly. The OP doesn't want the pup and he or she doesn't want to change. I hope the pup finds a good home and the OP doesn't get another pet until he or she is more mature and responsible. We're not all cut out to be good dog owners, sadly enough.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:08 PM
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Still a baby raising a baby either way, I'd say... There are simply some exceptional babies out there that are admirably responsible, disciplined and driven for their age and peerage.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:14 PM
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Still a baby raising a baby either way, I'd say... There are simply some exceptional babies out there that are admirably responsible, disciplined and driven for their age and peerage.
I think that gives teenagers a cop out excuse if that's what they're looking for. I don't think being a responsible teenager is exceptional or unusual. Referring to teens as babies only reinforces adults into stereotyping all teens as acting like babies. Sorry, I know it's gone off topic but I find it upsets me when people label whole bunches of people together and especially when the label is unflattering and inaccurate.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:14 PM
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This is a typical disappointing situation, and it will be the dog that suffers unfortunately. At least you recognize you don't want to give the dog what it needs. My suggestion is to rehome and do it sooner than later. Younger pups are easier to rehome, haven't missed out on critical socialization yet, and people will think of them as more of a "blank slate" for training. Older, adolescent, untrained, unsocialized dogs are much less "cute" in the public eye and will be harder to rehome--and will be set back in its development as socially functional dog.

I wonder if you all thought about who would take care of the dog when you graduate high school and possibly go to college/move out/whatever. That's another thing to consider.

Good luck rehoming. Please don't be fooled into thinking that a rehoming fee will ensure a good home. Interview them, get references from their vet, and go inspect their home. Get a background check on them. If they don't have a fence, ask how they will contain it. Ask if it will be indoor/outdoor or only outdoor. Ask what kind of activities/exercise they will do. If they rent, get something in writing from their landlord that they can have the dog. Make sure they have plans for training. Make sure they are steadily employed. Just because you don't think you'll be taking the pup to the shelter, doesn't mean the next owners won't if you're not careful selecting them. Finally, have them take that "rehoming fee" and deposit it at their vets' so that you know they have money set aside for vet care. There is no sense in you just pocketing the cash--that won't help the dog. I know this sounds like a lot of work (and I know you said you are lazy), but your pup deserves you at least put this amount of effort into making sure it has a good life with someone else.

Last edited by crock; 04-15-2014 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:15 PM
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As for the "do you really want to add to those statistics", if I decide that I don't want him anymore, I will find him a home myself. Family, friends, friends of family, whatever. I will personally see to it that he has a home if I give him away. So there's no concern about finding a no-kill shelter or contributing to "statistics".

And for the expenses thing, my grandparents have covered most of it, other than the adoption fee, which I payed. I'm sure they will continue to do that. However, I cannot afford a bigger crate for him, and he's growing at the speed of light. His crate is too small, and my grandpa has said that he isn't going to buy him a new one, which isn't fair to the dog.

I know that him being a puppy is just a stage, but also I'm simply tired of taking care of him, too. Which, I can just feel some of you ready to pounce on me, but I'm being honest. I'm tired of the responsibility. I did research on the responsibility before I got the dog, and I thought I was ready, but no amount of research can prepare you for the real deal.

Also, I do know myself enough that, even if I promise I'll step up to the plate and start walking him regularly and whatnot, that I will end up not doing that. Or doing it for two days and then not doing it anymore. I know myself enough to know that that's exactly what I will do.
You're probably bracing yourself to be pounced on (to use your word for it), but let me say that I appreciate that you're being honest with us and yourself. Ultimately, rehoming is up to you. My two cents is if you give going all in with this dog a shot, you might be pleasantly surprised.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:16 PM
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I'm afraid you're still going to be one of the many, many people who buy a puppy and get rid of them after a few months when they get bored. It's good you're invested in finding him a new home, but next time make sure you really really are committed before taking on an animal.

It's a little sad that you say you know yourself and wouldn't commit to caring for your dog... You could have used this opportunity to improve yourself, and learn dedication and grit. Ah well. Hopefully his next home will be more prepared. (Sorry to sound a little lecturing, it's just that it kind of stings to see this happening. I'm nearly 23 and want my own dog more than anything, but I know I'm not secure enough to have one yet. To see someone have one and throw them away out of laziness is galling.)
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:17 PM
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I think that gives teenagers a cop out excuse if that's what they're looking for. I don't think being a responsible teenager is exceptional or unusual. Referring to teens as babies only reinforces adults into stereotyping all teens as acting like babies. Sorry, I know it's gone off topic but I find it upsets me when people label whole bunches of people together and especially when the label is unflattering and inaccurate.
I think the distinction is that most teens don't take on a responsibility that they know to be too much for them in the first place: they go on birth control, skip the pet store, etc. etc. etc. They're aware that they're teens and act accordingly.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:28 PM
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As for the "do you really want to add to those statistics", if I decide that I don't want him anymore, I will find him a home myself. Family, friends, friends of family, whatever. I will personally see to it that he has a home if I give him away. So there's no concern about finding a no-kill shelter or contributing to "statistics".

And for the expenses thing, my grandparents have covered most of it, other than the adoption fee, which I payed. I'm sure they will continue to do that. However, I cannot afford a bigger crate for him, and he's growing at the speed of light. His crate is too small, and my grandpa has said that he isn't going to buy him a new one, which isn't fair to the dog.

I know that him being a puppy is just a stage, but also I'm simply tired of taking care of him, too. Which, I can just feel some of you ready to pounce on me, but I'm being honest. I'm tired of the responsibility. I did research on the responsibility before I got the dog, and I thought I was ready, but no amount of research can prepare you for the real deal.

Also, I do know myself enough that, even if I promise I'll step up to the plate and start walking him regularly and whatnot, that I will end up not doing that. Or doing it for two days and then not doing it anymore. I know myself enough to know that that's exactly what I will do.
If you are not going to step up to the plate, quit being lazy, and start meeting ALL the needs of the pup, then yes you should rehome him now rather then later.

You also need to start taking care of him financially as much as possible. You can save whatever money you earn, or receive, go on e-bay and find a crate for the pup. You're grandparents are footing most of the bill for him? I'm assuming that means food and vet care? What about if he needs a different type of collar? My "free" dog came with a collar, unfortunately that collar will end up causing a collapsed trachea if I use it, guess who has to buy him a harness? Are you saving up in case you need an emergency vet, or have you talked to your grandparents about if they will be willing to pay for one if needed? What happens if your grandparents decide to no longer pay for the pups care?

You also need to think about the future. What about housing? When you move are you prepared to spend extra time looking for a place that will except your dog and are you prepared to pay a pet deposit on top of the regular deposit? If you go away to college (if you aren't already attending) what happens to the dog? What if the pup develops behavioral issues such as fear of humans or dogs, are you able to work through those problems or hire a behaviorist to help you?

I suggest you take a long look at your lifestyle and your future. It's very, very, easy to get a puppy or dog, the ownership of one is often not so easy. There is no shame in admitting that you are in over your head, or that you are just not cut out for dog ownership, but admitting it sooner rather then later it important.
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Old 04-15-2014, 02:34 PM
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well... I mean it really doesn't matter how responsible other teenagers are. This is about me and my ability and willingness to care for a dog.

Anyway, not only do I not think I'm ready, I think a lot of you are ignoring some of the really important things I've said, like how the dog is too big for his crate and my grandfather refuses to get him a new one. He's hunched over when he's in it. That's got to be uncomfortable, and I can't afford to get him one myself. On top of that, we don't have a fenced back yard, so I'm not able to let him just run around. We did get a stake to put him outside with, though.

I am very well aware that I shouldn't have brought a puppy into my home if I wasn't ready to care for it--or I am now. I wasn't when I brought him home. I was excited because oh boy! a cute little fuzzball! And it will definitely hurt if I give him up. I'm not just tossing him out and turning my back. I do love the dog. And I'm going to be sad about him being gone. But I also think that it might be best for me and the dog if he had a better owner who was more willing to tend to his needs and ready for the ownership of a puppy. I'm not--not yet at least. If anything, my first dog should have been an older dog, but I rushed in and that didn't happen. So if I try again, I will definitely at least know what I'm getting into with a dog, and I'll know that I should take on the responsibility of an older dog before even thinking about another puppy.

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