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Puppy turning very aggressive

This is a discussion on Puppy turning very aggressive within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; @ cookieface and @ Rennajade Yes, you're both right - I always get that one mixed up! Negative punishment, the removal, not addition of. thanks ...

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Old 10-28-2014, 12:37 PM
  #21
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@cookieface and @Rennajade

Yes, you're both right - I always get that one mixed up! Negative punishment, the removal, not addition of. thanks for the correction
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:05 PM
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thank you for your kind words and advice. after reading your replies i really re-thought everything i did to my puppy and also what i didnt do. we really talked this throught with my fiance and we have decided to give it away because all of the arguments boiled down to this: we have never thought (due to a lot of misinformation from our relatives) that our puppy would be THIS noisy at night. We simply can't keep him in our apartment because he wakes up our neightbours and they call the police on us. We really tried eveything, even sleeping during the day, but it doesnt help.
Pup probably needs more time with his crate training to be able to fall asleep without us sitting next to him. And time is what we dont have in this case. We really had to lock him in a garage overnight and we still could hear his barking in our house.

It hurts us so much, because he is very adorable, not aggressive, learns quickly, it's just his anxiety problems that led us to this decision.
And we cant calm him down because he will go on right after we go back to bed. When he falls asleep tired of whining he wakes up if we move and goes on again. It's a check mate situation for us because i have quit my job to be able to give him a lot of time.
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by roflol View Post
thank you for your kind words and advice. after reading your replies i really re-thought everything i did to my puppy and also what i didnt do. we really talked this throught with my fiance and we have decided to give it away because all of the arguments boiled down to this: we have never thought (due to a lot of misinformation from our relatives) that our puppy would be THIS noisy at night. We simply can't keep him in our apartment because he wakes up our neightbours and they call the police on us. We really tried eveything, even sleeping during the day, but it doesnt help.
Pup probably needs more time with his crate training to be able to fall asleep without us sitting next to him. And time is what we dont have in this case. We really had to lock him in a garage overnight and we still could hear his barking in our house.

It hurts us so much, because he is very adorable, not aggressive, learns quickly, it's just his anxiety problems that led us to this decision.
And we cant calm him down because he will go on right after we go back to bed. When he falls asleep tired of whining he wakes up if we move and goes on again. It's a check mate situation for us because i have quit my job to be able to give him a lot of time.

It sounds like he either has seperation anxiety, OR, and I think this is more likely, y'all have taught him that whining, crying, or barking is what gets you to open the crate and let him out.

If you do decide to rehome him I respect y'alls decision, but if you decide to keep him or in the future get another puppy or dog, then I give you this advice.

Do not let the puppy out of the crate when it's pitching a fit or making noise. All that does is teach it that that's what gets it let out. You need to ignore the noise completely and wait for 5 seconds of quiet then start playing red light green light. Green light = going towards the crate, red light= stopping completely. When the puppy has been quiet for 5 seconds, green light, start going toward the crate. When he makes any sound as you move towards the crate, red light, stop dead in your tracks ignore him completely (don't look at him, don't talk to him, he does not exist when he makes noise) and wait for 5 more seconds of quiet. Do that till you open the crate and let him out. Do that every time he's crated, and be prepared for the training to take a few days. Ultimately what you are teaching him is that noise = not being let out, but quiet = being let out. You also need to be prepared for what's known as an extinction burst, that's where the dog will throw everything they have into the unwanted behavior before giving up on it. Do not give in to the extinction burst or you'll teach the pup that if it barks loud and long enough you'll open the crate and the behavior will be 10x worse.
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:28 PM
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It sounds like he either has seperation anxiety, OR, and I think this is more likely, y'all have taught him that whining, crying, or barking is what gets you to open the crate and let him out.

If you do decide to rehome him I respect y'alls decision, but if you decide to keep him or in the future get another puppy or dog, then I give you this advice.

Do not let the puppy out of the crate when it's pitching a fit or making noise. All that does is teach it that that's what gets it let out. You need to ignore the noise completely and wait for 5 seconds of quiet then start playing red light green light. Green light = going towards the crate, red light= stopping completely. When the puppy has been quiet for 5 seconds, green light, start going toward the crate. When he makes any sound as you move towards the crate, red light, stop dead in your tracks ignore him completely (don't look at him, don't talk to him, he does not exist when he makes noise) and wait for 5 more seconds of quiet. Do that till you open the crate and let him out. Do that every time he's crated, and be prepared for the training to take a few days. Ultimately what you are teaching him is that noise = not being let out, but quiet = being let out. You also need to be prepared for what's known as an extinction burst, that's where the dog will throw everything they have into the unwanted behavior before giving up on it. Do not give in to the extinction burst or you'll teach the pup that if it barks loud and long enough you'll open the crate and the behavior will be 10x worse.
We obviously did our homework on raising a puppy and do exactly that, but the problem is my fiance has some issues when it comes to animals. She is way too soft and loving towards them what (i do believe so) to our puppy craving for her presence like for a drug.
It hurts really much because its our fault the way he is now. If we could only turn back time those 8 days and start anew with our current knowledge..

The pup just goes nuts with his whining when there is noone around, if he hears noises, us walking, talking (but not seeing us) he is all cheered up and happy in his cage. Hell breaks lose once we hold our breaths and stay quiet for a minute.
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Old 10-28-2014, 02:06 PM
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Where are you keeping the crate at night? This will make a huge difference in the noise levels.

Being a social animal and a baby at that, it's normal for a dog to get a bit anxious if left alone in the dark. Expecting them to sleep that way... even more so! Dogs find safety in numbers and in the wild, the most unsafe circumstances to fall asleep in are probably when mom, dad and your brothers and sisters aren't there to watch your back.

If you haven't already, put the crate in your bedroom! The dog needs to be able to hear you sleeping, just to know that you will be right there if anything happens. Over time, as the dog grows older and gets more familiar with your house, s/he may take no issue with sleeping down the hall, in the living room, etc. But puppies are liable to put up a huge fuss if they can't be in the same room with their parents and hear them snoring a few feet away.
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Old 10-28-2014, 02:21 PM
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Sounds like you have made your decision. I would contact the breeder you got him from to see if they would be willing to take him back, and if not, then maybe see if a no kill rescue could assist you in placing him in a new home. Finding a good home by yourself can be difficult, especially with a cute puppy. A lot of people lie and will decieve you into thinking they will provide a great home when they actually won't.
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Old 10-28-2014, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by roflol View Post
We obviously did our homework on raising a puppy and do exactly that, but the problem is my fiance has some issues when it comes to animals. She is way too soft and loving towards them what (i do believe so) to our puppy craving for her presence like for a drug.
It hurts really much because its our fault the way he is now. If we could only turn back time those 8 days and start anew with our current knowledge..

The pup just goes nuts with his whining when there is noone around, if he hears noises, us walking, talking (but not seeing us) he is all cheered up and happy in his cage. Hell breaks lose once we hold our breaths and stay quiet for a minute.
So eight days is all that you're willing to give your puppy? Oh well.......

For what it's worth, eight days is really nothing at all. You haven't even had a chance to try out the link on crate-training that I posted for you.

Please, as jClark and Grabby have suggested, try to rehome this puppy responsibly. Craigslist really should be a last resort.
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Old 10-28-2014, 02:38 PM
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I'm skeptical that you and your fiance created the crate issue in 8 days. Puppies don't like to be alone and if the breeder didn't introduce crates, it's going to be a huge adjustment for the pup (in addition to moving to a new home).

I do agree that if you can't keep the pup, rehome through the breeder or a reputable rescue. And, I wouldn't get another puppy any time soon.
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Old 10-28-2014, 02:55 PM
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the final decision is to wait few days and see how the pup manages to sleep in a crate all by himself. He is sleeping now but we are right beside him so it's hard to tell whether he will behave or not.

I just have few questions regarding the positive training to really UNDERSTAND the mechanics behind dog's mentality.

So my pup wants to jump on the couch to sit with me. If i should follow cesar's way i should push him and say NO until he calms down and then allow him after an eye contact.

So when i want to do it the positive way should i ignore the pup or say no, sit and once he sits give him a treat and take to me?

What about jumping on the cage? If i am supervising him I say NO and wait untill he quiets down and then praise him for being cal, but what if I am cooking and cant give him my attention. Should i ignore him or can use a can with coins with a firm NO?

My last issue for now is that i have trained my pup to let everyone be touched and take food out of his bowl while eating, but he gets really aggressive when i try to take his toy ot food out of the crate. How to stop that with positive method?
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by roflol View Post
the final decision is to wait few days and see how the pup manages to sleep in a crate all by himself. He is sleeping now but we are right beside him so it's hard to tell whether he will behave or not.

I just have few questions regarding the positive training to really UNDERSTAND the mechanics behind dog's mentality.

So my pup wants to jump on the couch to sit with me. If i should follow cesar's way i should push him and say NO until he calms down and then allow him after an eye contact.

So when i want to do it the positive way should i ignore the pup or say no, sit and once he sits give him a treat and take to me?
Depends on what you want...
Personally I don't care at all if my dogs jump up into my lap or next to me on furniture. My expectations are simply that they move/get off when asked. I use a hand target (see video below) to move them. If I want them to lay down in a different place on the couch, I get them there and cue a down. If I want them off, I direct them to their beds and ask them to settle there (second video).

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What about jumping on the cage? If i am supervising him I say NO and wait untill he quiets down and then praise him for being cal, but what if I am cooking and cant give him my attention. Should i ignore him or can use a can with coins with a firm NO?
Jumping on the crate door or x-pen?
Frankly I would ignore any jumping or fussing. Choose a special word like ''yes,'' ''yep,'' a tongue click, etc. to use to communicate with your pup ''good job! That's right!you earn a cookie!'' Capture quiet by saying your marker word and tossing a treat (keep some in your pockets so you're always prepared). If puppy stays quiet then mark and toss another. Repeat, repeat, repeat. See videos. Your marker word works the same as the clicker. The second video is about greeting calmly but can very easily be tweeked to apply to when you are cooking dinner.

Something else you can do is to invest in food toys and chews, put puppy in the cage with a frozen stuffed kong or other chew/toy to help keep puppy busy and quiet.

Quote:
My last issue for now is that i have trained my pup to let everyone be touched and take food out of his bowl while eating, but he gets really aggressive when i try to take his toy ot food out of the crate. How to stop that with positive method?
A week and a few days into owning this pup, your pup is far from trained. If your puppy is reacting poorly to you trying to remove food and toys from his crate you'll want to read this thread.
https://www.dogforum.com/training-beh...fication-7511/
Think about what I said in my prior post. For unwanted behavior you need to supervise/manage so it doesn't happen. So that may mean removing your puppy from the area so you can safely reach in and do what you need to do. It could also mean no toys in the crate and only reaching in for a bowl, once he is finished eating and off to the next thing with your gf. You'll need to think on it and come up with a solution that works for you.
Then the second part of resolving an issue is actively training what you want your puppy to do instead. I would start out with working on trading games. There is a nice video in the resource guarding sticky thread I linked to to help you get started. Note that the item is not immediately taken away, rather given back and they puppy always has a choice. Also the item the owner is trading is better (in the dog's opinion) than what the dog has so the dog does want to trade. Also you would work with first low value items (things your puppy doesn't care much about giving up) working your way up to high value (things puppy really likes).
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Last edited by kmes; 10-28-2014 at 05:14 PM.
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