Puppy proofing the house

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Puppy proofing the house

This is a discussion on Puppy proofing the house within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; Its been 5 years since we had a puppy. At that time, the worst damage he did was chew two pairs of shoes, jump up ...

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Old 12-29-2011, 06:47 PM
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Puppy proofing the house

Its been 5 years since we had a puppy. At that time, the worst damage he did was chew two pairs of shoes, jump up on kitchen cabinets and scratch the surface, and chew on a door frame while he was confined in kitchen.

We are considering getting an 8 month old puppy and are starting to make a list of how to puppy proof.

Apart from some of the obvious things like:

-put away anything you don't want dog to get to
-never leave dog unattended around something unless it has earned trust
-remove harmful plants, anything that can toppe over, anything sharp, confine cords that dog could get to
-close doors to rooms you don't want dog in
-cover couch with blankets

What else should we do?

We live in a new house with hardwood/area rugs on the main floor. Our current dog has already scratched up the floors quite a bit but hasn't ever ruined the area rugs. Should we remove the area rugs and replace with cheapies? Should we go as far as wrapping the wooden legs of our new dining room furniture (main floor is open concept so everything is open), cover lower kitchen cabinets/appliances/furniture in cardboard/paper to avoid scratching if dog jumps up?

Am I being too paranoid? Am I over-thinking what we need to puppy proof? Hubby and I have been in a new house for just 2 years so furniture/appliances are still brnad new and we'd like to keep it that way as best we can.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:29 PM
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I think you have the right idea. If you worry about it anymore, it will probably become reality. Life tends to work the way we think. If you keep an eye on em' and correct bad behavior early, you will just have the occassional mess.

I worried like that originally and crate trained my guys, but looking back, I wish I wouldn't have let my stuff in the house own me.

You'll be fine based on what you plan to do.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by drewrilla View Post
I think you have the right idea. If you worry about it anymore, it will probably become reality. Life tends to work the way we think. If you keep an eye on em' and correct bad behavior early, you will just have the occassional mess.

I worried like that originally and crate trained my guys, but looking back, I wish I wouldn't have let my stuff in the house own me.

You'll be fine based on what you plan to do.
Thanks! I don't want to have to completely wrap the house in protective plastic/paper but I also don't want to do too little and then kick myself later thinking "I shoulda know to cover that!".
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:32 PM
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It sounds to me like you have a good handle on the preparations.

Although some 8 month olds go through a teething stage, for the most part, most dogs are finished with random chewing of cords and chair legs by this time. They still can be interested in shoes and other "contraband" though, but if you keep an eye on the pup, things should not get out of hand.

Here's my favorite set of puppy books. They complement each other nicely: the first being more philosophical/perspective and the second being some specific training routines. Since you are so into preparation, a little reading could be a really productive way to focus your energy!

Amazon.com: puppy primer Amazon.com: puppy primer

Amazon.com: Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog (9781577314554): Dr. Ian Dunbar: Books Amazon.com: Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog (9781577314554): Dr. Ian Dunbar: Books
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:38 PM
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It sounds to me like you have a good handle on the preparations.

Although some 8 month olds go through a teething stage, for the most part, most dogs are finished with random chewing of cords and chair legs by this time. They still can be interested in shoes and other "contraband" though, but if you keep an eye on the pup, things should not get out of hand.

Here's my favorite set of puppy books. They complement each other nicely: the first being more philosophical/perspective and the second being some specific training routines. Since you are so into preparation, a little reading could be a really productive way to focus your energy!

Amazon.com: puppy primer

Amazon.com: Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog (9781577314554): Dr. Ian Dunbar: Books
Thanks! I slowly going through all the videos stickied in the training thread. I'm *almost* getting overwhelmed with all the info. But I'm trying to tell myself that I don't have to teach the pup everything in one day!

I'll take a look at the books you recommended. For the most part Simon was a good puppy so I think I got off easy with the first one. But since every dog has a mind of its own I don't think I can be TOO prepared.

Someone else mentioend the 'nothing in life is free' theory and I read up on in a bit. I was surprised to find that I already follow NILIF principles with Simon and didn't even know it. For example, he has to sit nicely before he gets his food, has to sit and wait to be invited into the house after walks before going foward; that sort of thing.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:43 PM
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The first link didn't work. Did you mean this book?

Amazon.com: The Puppy Primer (9781891767135): Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D., Brenda Scidmore: Books Amazon.com: The Puppy Primer (9781891767135): Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D., Brenda Scidmore: Books
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:32 PM
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Yes, that's the book!

Sorry about the link... computer problems here!
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:30 PM
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I have 3 pups and what we have done is to have a confined area for nighttime and when we are not home. You could use a crate.. I just have 3 together so I have a 6x7 foot indoor pen for them with a crate, water, food, peepad and toys. My kitchen is large and completely puppy proofed with nothing they can get into so they can be in there unsupervised. The rest of my house is open to them with supervision only. It's working out well for us that way.
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:11 PM
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Yes we will use a crate. We already bought one in fact The dog will be in the crate while we are not home and when it cannot be supervised. I plan to block off the second floor of the house so that the dog has to stay on the main floor while out of the crate until it earns the freeedom to go upstairs. I'm contemplating using a leash on the dog as an umbilical cord but not sure how the dog will react. The dog hasn't been used to wearing a collar or leash until now.
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