Is it okay to smack a puppy on the side of the back leg?

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Is it okay to smack a puppy on the side of the back leg?

This is a discussion on Is it okay to smack a puppy on the side of the back leg? within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; My puppy bites a lot, gets into the rubbish and chases my cat around. I know she is just a puppy but is it ever ...

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Old 06-03-2013, 07:02 PM
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Is it okay to smack a puppy on the side of the back leg?

My puppy bites a lot, gets into the rubbish and chases my cat around. I know she is just a puppy but is it ever okay to just give them a little smack on the side of the leg, not hard and not enough to make them sook as well as a stern "No". just to let them know they have done something wrong? I have heard hitting a dog can cause behavioral issues when they are older, but surely just a little tap won't do this? People do this to their kids all the time, just a little tap on the hand to let them know when they have done something wrong. When she is not getting up to mischief she is very loving and cuddly, and loves running around in the backyard. Any advice on this would be helpful or other methods of dealing with naughty behaviour.




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Old 06-03-2013, 07:10 PM
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No, that's no alright, you should be preventing her from doing those things, not correcting her after she does them.

She is not a human child and she will not learn like one does. Prevent her from doing what you do not want her to do, and praise/reenforce what you do want her to do.

She shouldn't have access to rubbish, she should be in a puppy proofed room. Do not play with her with your hands, and when she does bite at you redirect her to a toy, if she keeps it up put her in a crate or x-pen with a treat to chew on to give her a chance to calm down then let her back out.
Same with the cat redirect her.
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:26 PM
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She has her crate to go into, but we don't use that as a place to put her if she is in trouble. She has access to the whole house as I am home every day, and if I go out somewhere she goes into her crate, usually she just follows me around but when the cats in the room she will chase him, I don't want to lock her away into her own room with minimal contact, I don't like that. She likes being around people, which means I need to pay extra attention to her. But on the few occasions she does get up to mischief, should I just let her get away with it? I am always praising her for good behaviour and giving her treats, she is ten weeks old and already knows sit and stay. When I'm patting her or rubbing her belly she gets very excited and tries to bite, not hard or not to be mean, but i want to stop this before she gets any older. I pull my hand away and ignore her for a short time but she continues to do it. Should this mean I don't pat her or rub her belly as this means she has contact with my hands? I'm just trying to do the best I can with her and in no way am I hurting her or trying to hurt her.


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Old 06-03-2013, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holly j View Post
She has her crate to go into, but we don't use that as a place to put her if she is in trouble. She has access to the whole house as I am home every day, and if I go out somewhere she goes into her crate, usually she just follows me around but when the cats in the room she will chase him, I don't want to lock her away into her own room with minimal contact, I don't like that. She likes being around people, which means I need to pay extra attention to her. But on the few occasions she does get up to mischief, should I just let her get away with it? I am always praising her for good behaviour and giving her treats, she is ten weeks old and already knows sit and stay. When I'm patting her or rubbing her belly she gets very excited and tries to bite, not hard or not to be mean, but i want to stop this before she gets any older. I pull my hand away and ignore her for a short time but she continues to do it. Should this mean I don't pat her or rub her belly as this means she has contact with my hands? I'm just trying to do the best I can with her and in no way am I hurting her or trying to hurt her.


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I know you wasn't suggesting that you hit her or anything like that, and I know how frustrating a puppy can be when they decide to act up. When he was a puppy there was times I was certain that my boy was a terrier x demon, he could be hell on 4 tiny paws!

Don't let her get away with stuff, definitely stop her, just do so in a positive manner. A very handy command to teach is Leave It, and once she knows that command use it to get her to stop doing what she's not supposed to. Once she stops then direct her to what she can do.

I'm not saying to use the crate as a punishment, a crate should not be used that way, I'm suggesting putting her in there with a nice chew to give her a chance to calm down, and you should only do that when redirecting is not working because she is to wound up to stop doing something. It's sort of like putting a toddler into their bed for a nap because they need it. A puppy is the same way, they will get overtired and need a nap but not want to take one.

Does she always try to play with your hand when you pet her? I stopped my boy from biting my hand in play by giving him one of his stuffed animals to bite on and play with every time he bit me, once he took the toy I'd play with him with it for a little while. If he kept up trying to bite me then I'd stop playing with him and get out of his reach. If she's trying to teeth on you you can try giving her a chew to gnaw on while you pet her. Be consistent, every time she bites you take your hand away and give her the chew then pet her again.

I do understand not wanting to keep her in the crate all the time, or in a puppy proof room, but it's just not safe to let her roam the whole house on her own. It's like letting a 3 year old child roam all over the house with no one to watch him. Have you tried tethering her to you, or using an ex-pen to keep her in the same room as your in? An ex-pen is sort of like a puppy play pen
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Old 06-03-2013, 08:36 PM
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I understand what your saying. I have only done it twice now, and only out of frustration. I just wanted to know whether it was okay, or wether I needed to try something else.
I have never heard of a puppy ex pen, but I will look into it. I'm a student, studying at home, so I tend to get distracted with what I am doing on my computer. Usually she just plays with her toys in front of me, but sometimes she will get up and explore.

And yes, she bites a lot when she gets excited and she gets excited for simply patting her or rubbing her belly. I will give her the chew toy to stop her from
Biting me, chew on it for a bit and then she will come back for more of my hand. When my partner arrives home from work she runs up to him and my partner gives her a cuddle and a rub on the head but she gets so excited that she just ends up trying to bite him the whole time. He has tried ignoring her when he gets home until she has settled down and then saying hello, but she continues to bite. Is she teething? Is this why? Will she grow out of it? Or do we just continue to ignore her when she bites and give her a toy?

My partner has put myself in charge of discipline, 1. Because I'm home a lot and 2. Because he wants to discipline her old school, like how his parents did it when he was growing up, which means rolled up newspaper on the nose , yelling, rubbing her nose in it when she goes to the toilet inside. I have said absolutely not to these things and he doesn't understand as he says his family dogs turned out fine. So it's been left up to me. I'm just going to have to stick with it and use other alternatives.


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Old 06-03-2013, 11:35 PM
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She's just being a puppy and playing. When Shadow was a pup it helped me to think of him as a baby, rather then a puppy, for some reason doing that helped me to set my expectations appropriately.

To some puppies (and Shadow was one) everything is an invitation to play. You walk away and they want to play, you pet them and they want to play, get undressed and it's play time (after all that must be why you're waving clothes around). It's what they used to do to their litter mates and that's how they are viewing humans. It's up to us humans to teach them what's appropriate to play with (their toys, and chews) and what's not (everything else especially human skin).

For teaching them what's appropriate you need to be consistent and persistent. EVERY time the pup bites a human the consequences have to be the same, you can't let her get away with it 4 times then the 5th time give in doing that will just teach her to keep at it since it's fun and sometimes she's allowed to do it. It can take weeks to get get them to stop the biting but they will learn. Some people have success spraying their skin with bitter apple spray, if you try that try it on a small area of skin first in case your sensitive to it.

I wouldn't ignore the biting, she'll probably grow out of biting when you try to pet her, but she'll not grow out of seeing your hands as toys unless you teach her to not play with them. Now if you don't mind having your hands grabbed in play then you can ignore it, I didn't like it since my boy HURT when he bit even in play.

I'm glad that you're not using those old school methods, some pups can handle it, but most can't. I once had one that just speaking harshly to would have her cringing and fearful, broke my heart when I realized how bad I had scared her.

Here's some sticky threads that may help you:
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-behavior...signals-10084/
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-training...rticles-11426/
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-training...ing-food-1219/
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-training...tioning-23702/
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-training...-fallout-4776/

and for when he's a little older
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-training...-walking-1683/
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Old 06-04-2013, 05:03 AM
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You are getting very good advice here, so I won't add much except to reinforce the fact that hitting, smacking, yelling, holding down, or otherwise intimidating, punishing or frightening your puppy WILL result in very bad issues later on with your adult dog.

You and your partner need a crash course on puppy raising. The links you have been given are excellent. Also here is a very good book that might appeal to you guys as it does teach manners for the puppy, but in a way that won't be damaging.

Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog: Dr. Ian Dunbar: 9781577314554: Amazon.com: Books Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog: Dr. Ian Dunbar: 9781577314554: Amazon.com: Books


Keep in mind that there are "formative weeks/months" for puppies, just as there are critical early years with children. You really want to do things right in this first few months or there are long term consequences. And, let me say that most mistakes people make at this time are being way too harsh. Losing your temper or frightening the puppy at this age can make a huge impression on the pup and will come back to haunt you when the dog enters adulthood. That is when fear turns to aggression. What you seen now with a puppy after it is "corrected" that appears to be the pup being obedient is actually the pup being intimidated and this may later turn to fearful-self-protective-aggression. Don't make that mistake.

Get the Ian Dunbar book and use that as your "puppy bible". You will be pleased with the results and you won't risk harming your pup and causing long term problems.
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