Normal Puppy Behaviour?

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Normal Puppy Behaviour?

This is a discussion on Normal Puppy Behaviour? within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; Hi I got a bedlington terrier puppy a week ago, he's now 9 weeks old. I am at a loss at what to do with ...

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Old 10-06-2010, 07:24 AM
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Normal Puppy Behaviour?

Hi

I got a bedlington terrier puppy a week ago, he's now 9 weeks old. I am at a loss at what to do with him.

He is my first puppy, we had a dog before but i was only 5 years old when he was a puppy and I can't really remember that phase. So to be honest, I'm not sure what normal puppy behaviour is.

He has completely mad moments when he's running around doing everything he knows he's not allowed to, running up the stairs, chewing the curtains and pulling his blanket off the crate. Nothing we say or do stops him. He also bites alot. And he's even started growling and snarling then biting

He's started chewing clumps out of the lawn and he just won't listen.

I'm trying to do the positive reinforcement training but I find i am shouting and having to use force alot of the time to make him stop these behaviours.

He can also be so good and has learnt to sit and lay down already. He seems to be very intelligent.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Is all of this really just normal puppy behaviour?
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Old 10-06-2010, 10:04 AM
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What you are seeing is normal puppy behavior, particularly if pup is bored and not getting enough exercise! They do go crazy momentarily, for a few minutes, often a couple of times a day!

Truly, to a large extent, they cannot help themselves, so you are right to stay away from the "punishment" for this. If pup is in a crazy mood, take him outside where running about is good! Throw a toy for him. Get him engaged in active stuff that is OK! He should tire out in 10 minutes then will be safe to bring back in the house.

At such a young age, its expecting too much for pup to refrain from chewing, running about, being "naughty." So the way to deal with this is to have pup in a "puppyproof" area where he cannot do any harm or hurt himself.

Here are some book recommends. It seems like it might help you to get the "big picture" on puppy behavior.

Amazon.com: Puppy Whisperer: A Compassionate, Non Violent Guide to Early Training and Care (9781593375973): Paul Owens, Terence Cranendonk, Norma Eckroate: Books Amazon.com: Puppy Whisperer: A Compassionate, Non Violent Guide to Early Training and Care (9781593375973): Paul Owens, Terence Cranendonk, Norma Eckroate: Books

Amazon.com: Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog (9781577314554): Dr. Ian Dunbar: Books Amazon.com: Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Well-Behaved Dog (9781577314554): Dr. Ian Dunbar: Books

I would encourage you to just spend a few dollars to get a couple of books fast. It will be money well invested!

Enjoy your little fella. They don't stay young and silly very long, but how you deal with this stage is crucial to pup growing up happy and well balanced.
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Old 10-06-2010, 04:21 PM
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Totally normal behaviour....for a new puppy owner to panic.

Firstly - ditto Tess. Puppies are lively beings, they need a lot of mental exercise, so start training! Sit, down, and leave it to start and then move along to stays. Easy to teach, and will keep him much calmer.

Secondly, it's never too early to socialise. Walk with him in your arms to schools when all the kids are coming out and get them to give him treats, buses, cars, everything he needs to learn to accept because he's NEVER seen them before! So lots of walking him about will help with that until he's allowed to walk on his own four feet.

Thirdly - biting. Mouthing is totally normal, they explore with their mouths. So if you screetch and shout whilst he's doing it, guess what? He's going to think 'This is awesome, playtime!' so the best thing to do is to first of all teach him to bite gently. Play with him and when he bites too hard, let out a high yelp, stand up, and ignore him. He'll soon learn the game is over - and yes, he will try to keep it going, by biting your ankles, jeans, etc. Just ignore him. This is the only way he'll learn. Growling and snarling are play noises, but if you tell him off for them, you've just gotten rid of the only warning you'll have if he's uncomfortable and is going to bite you (or someone else) so NEVER tell him off for warning you.

If he knows sit, you no longer need to use force. In my honest opinion, the word 'No!' is never needed for a puppy, and I've never said it to my two...
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Old 10-12-2010, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulip View Post
so the best thing to do is to first of all teach him to bite gently.
personally... from day one that i have a dog/puppy, they are tought that they are NOT to put their teeth on me... EVER. my dogs are large, if they even mouth a child it could really hurt them.. and pups have little sharp teeth that DO hurt no matter what size the dog is. mouthing is not acceptable in my book at all. i can sick my hand into my dogs mouths and they curl their lips over their teeth so they dont touch me. ive never had a problem because of this.

now a woman who sends her dog to daycare lets her dog mouth her. guess whos hand is all burised up from that dog now because hes a year and a half??

i just dont think its acceptable from any dog at any time.

as far as the rest of the OP. your pup sounds like it has a lot of energy built up. i would first suggest getting out and getting that burned off. that will reduce A LOT of your problems. also hes 9wks old, hes going to get into things, thats what they do. dont fret. everything is fun and games to them at this point. work on basic commands to mentally stimulate him too. a short amount of time with training (5-10 min) can really really tire a puppy right out flat.

Last edited by GreatDaneMom; 10-12-2010 at 02:27 PM.
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Old 10-12-2010, 07:27 PM
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The reason I teach soft mouth first is for bite inhibition. Think for a moment of this:
A dog taught NEVER to bite, at all, is on a walk one day. He's trotting along, minding his own business, and suddenly a child that doesn't know where its going runs into him and stands hard on his toes. The dog immediately does what it can to get the pain off his foot - he turns to bite the child. Having not learnt bite inhibition, which is to say, an appropriate bite, he bites down hard onto the child's arm, mauling her. The child is sent to hospital, the dog put down.

Now, imagine the dog had learnt that he was allowed to soft-mouth, whether it be from people or other dogs. Imagine his first instinct, then, was to soft-mouth, as he was taught, instead of biting down hard because he was never taught how to bite correctly. The dog mouths, realises, and releases with an apologetic lick. That is why I teach bite inhibition - it's also ingrained deeply into the dog and he'll learn it from other litter mates and dogs. So for me, even a large dog needs to learn it (even more so), because both of mine have been taught it and neither mouth, AT ALL, in play with me or my young neice and nephew. Because they were taught bite inhibition, when my boy was microchipped last year and wanted to bite me out of pain, he mouthed instead, didn't even leave a mark. Just something to consider - teach soft mouth, and then teach that it isn't appropriate for play with you or anyone else. I'm not saying 'Hey, let your dog mouth you all the time, play rough games with it, and then it'll be okay!'. I'm saying allow mouthing whilst it's exploring and learning to play, and let it know when it's too hard (whether with a cry out or stopping the game, which is exactly how litter mates teach them), and then let them know when it's appropriate (tug of war, but not play). This method is tried and tested by many owners, including moi.
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Old 10-12-2010, 07:34 PM
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^this a good example. My dogs mouth me and I have no problem with it, if it gets too rough I simply say ow and walk away.
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Old 10-13-2010, 09:49 AM
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he might not be gettin enough excercise. u just have to be firm with him
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Old 10-13-2010, 06:04 PM
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sorry i just find no place for mouthing to be an acceptable behavior in my book. if someone steps on my dog a warning growl or a yelp is fine enough and they also move away. they dont mouth someone for it. this is also tried and tested by many trainers including moi.
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Old 10-13-2010, 06:24 PM
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That was an example, GDM. Bite inhibition is a very important part of puppy development for the reasons I stated; if your dog ever struck out for any reason, wouldn't you rather it was a soft bite that it was taught instead of the only way it knew how? I'm not saying your dog would, or ever will - I'm saying hypothetically. What do you think?
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Old 10-13-2010, 06:27 PM
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Personally, I encourage soft, inhibited mouthing (not uninvited of course) with the assumption that if the dog ever does feel the need to bite. It will be inhibited.



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