Choosing the right small puppy breed. - Page 7

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior > Puppy Help

Choosing the right small puppy breed.

This is a discussion on Choosing the right small puppy breed. within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; Originally Posted by Criosphynx Also asking for a behavior after a bunch of unwanted ones IS rewarding the unasked for behavior. Strongly disagree, but that's ...

User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-05-2011, 06:20 PM
  #61
Senior Member
 
Sendiulino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 264
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Criosphynx View Post
Also asking for a behavior after a bunch of unwanted ones IS rewarding the unasked for behavior.
Strongly disagree, but that's just because I've never had a problem with any dog I've trained. I think the disconnect here is that it all depends on how you present the solution to the problem and how you're interacting with the dog while you're doing it. It is also strongly situational.

I should mention the dog does not do her "rollodex" any longer, I guess I worded the post poorly. Now she waits calmly or entertains herself near us until we're done what we're doing, because she knows if she's nice and calm, she'll get some attention... though not always a treat. Because we practice NILF she'd probably be overweight if we treated her for everything
Sendiulino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2011, 06:33 PM
  #62
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Sendiulino,
My point was that, when first teaching a puppy, its a miraculous moment when the puppy "gets it" and starts to offer behaviors... this "revelation" is something good to reinforce in a young dog who is "learning how to learn." I think you sort of missed my point about that.

And to offer you a bit of a heads up... Crio REALLY knows what she's talking about. She knows far more about dog training than most of us ever will in a lifetime. If she is willing to engage you, take advantage of the opportunity and learn from her!

Best Regards
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2011, 09:05 PM
  #63
Senior Member
 
Criosphynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Som'where between Utopia and Insomnia.
Posts: 11,482
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
I never said to treat her for "everything".
So you disagree its a chain and stim control. Why? Do you even understand the terms im using? Can you define them off the top of your head and give examples? I dont see how you can disagree when you clearly dont understand what im saying

If you don't want to learn. Thats fine. I wont waste your time, but telling me that im incorrect, because your "other dog" was different is silly. Not all dogs are the same, but the principles of learning are unwavering. Dogs offer behaviors like that because its reinforced. Either through a chain or lack of stim control. Self reinforcing is also probable. So if you have a magical fourth possibility I've som' how never heard of, please share. And not an antedote
Posted via Mobile Device



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
Criosphynx is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 10-14-2011, 07:24 AM
  #64
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 43
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Well thought I'd update on here what's been happening recently.

Poor woody got ill, he was being sick, took him to the vets where he has some injections. Couple days later he's back to his normal self. (he was very quiet for a few days)

His biting has become more frequent now drawing blood a couple times, now he doesn't just snap for no reason. He'll be wound up or excited or you try to bring him away from something he shouldn't be doing and you have to be carefull.

I'm not scared of him as it doesn't hurt but it's not something I want him to keep on doing when he gets bigger as it will start to be more aggressive.
Posted via Mobile Device
dannewcombe1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 08:58 AM
  #65
Dog Forum ModeraTHOR
 
kmes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 11,909
Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Mouthing is a completely normal puppy behavior!
But I do agree that it is something you want to fix sooner rather than later.
Take a look at the videos in this thread!
https://www.dogforum.com/dog-training...rticles-11426/
There is an excellent "Stop Biting" video as well as many others you may find helpful.
kmes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 09:56 AM
  #66
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
I'd recommend you use a slip lead to remove him from situations, rather than your hands on his collar.

Teach him to like the slip lead by practicing looping it over his head while you simultaneously pop a treat in his mouth. Soon he will welcome the lead.

This system keeps your hands out of the mix. I'm a bit concerned that there is a pattern being established of him being too rough with your skin.
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 10:09 AM
  #67
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Here's a slip lead This is something I use with my dog Josey, as it avoids the whole trigger with the hands thing.

Obviously you don't want to leave a lead like this on him while he walks around, as it could constrict his neck. Its just very much easier than grappling for D-rings to clip to, and also very easy to remove.

You can also just use a regular leash and make a "slip" from the handle end.
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 11:43 AM
  #68
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 43
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
the problem with the slip lead is as i've found today once he starts biting (which has become even more of a vicious act) he'll be really snapping at your hands. I'm quite confused what to do.

how can i either prevent him from getting to that state and what would i do in the situation where he is in that state.

I put him in his crate but he will constant bark for a good 15 minutes and weep for ever.
dannewcombe1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 12:23 PM
  #69
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannewcombe1 View Post
the problem with the slip lead is as i've found today once he starts biting (which has become even more of a vicious act) he'll be really snapping at your hands. I'm quite confused what to do.

how can i either prevent him from getting to that state and what would i do in the situation where he is in that state.

I put him in his crate but he will constant bark for a good 15 minutes and weep for ever.
Can you take a video of this "snapping" behavior? I'm not clear from your description if he is being a normal, excited, puppy, or if there is something more sinister going on.

My guess is he is just being a normal puppy who gets all excited and just wants to interact with everything via his mouth.

Assuming this is the case, I can reassure you this is normal! The way to deal with this is to put a nice soft toy in his mouth and gently encourage him to interact with that! ALWAYS have a toy in your hand to put in his mouth so you AVOID having him use your hands for play! NEVER "rough house" with him with your hands, and don't let anyone else do so either. If you have been allowing him to use hands as play objects, that would account for his focus on them.

Get him more exercise too. And make the exercise toy focused... toss a toy in the garden. If he gets all excited about biting your pant cuffs or hands, you must remain SUPER CALM so as not to get him more excited. Yes, putting him in his crate or in a room behind a baby gate until he calms down is a good idea... even if he barks for 15 minutes. Just IGNORE him. Don't yell at him or scold him for barking, because even that negative attention will reinforce him for barking, because he is seeking your acknowledgement.

Does some of this help?
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 12:29 PM
  #70
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
One key to working with puppies is to try not to get them all riled up and excited. They are not very good at calming themselves down. You must remain calm, move slowly, talk softly, and keep the puppy focused on toys such as balls, stuffed animals, rope toys etc. Children running about, high pitched noises, lots of activity and so forth gets puppies all out of control excited. If this happens, get the puppy out in the garden where he can safely spin off that energy. (well, you should do this often anyway).

It does not work to yell at, restrain, or otherwise try to force a puppy to calm down. What does work, is to be very, very calm yourself. Teach the puppy a "sit" word and reward with a treat. Keep bits of kibble in your pocket so you can ask for a sit any time puppy is being naughty and reward him with a bit of food. This will develop listening and self control with the puppy. Be super calm when you ask for the sit. Don't shout or ask many times. Ask in a normal voice and stand still waiting calmly. Repeat again in a few moments if it appears he has not tuned into you yet. Once puppy is sitting you can change his focus to a toy. Or perhaps you can call him to follow you out to the garden where you can let him run around.

Hope that helps.
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with choosing a dog (puppy) imer General Dog Discussion 4 09-08-2011 09:40 PM
Choosing my breed davidevans Dog Breeds 23 08-27-2009 06:43 PM
Choosing where to get your dog from, and what breed? Idalia General Dog Discussion 6 06-08-2009 09:06 PM
Need advice on choosing a puppy sparkle9 Puppy Help 2 04-01-2009 04:14 AM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.