Choosing a pup?

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior > Puppy Help

Choosing a pup?

This is a discussion on Choosing a pup? within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; Hi all We're going to see some golden retriever pups (6weeks old) and i was wondering what kind of things we should be looking out ...

User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-29-2010, 10:11 AM
  #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Question Choosing a pup?

Hi all
We're going to see some golden retriever pups (6weeks old) and i was wondering what kind of things we should be looking out for? or any tips in general?
They have been vet checked (how do i see proof of this?), wormed and front lined...
The parents can be seen and are the family pets, which sounds a plus.
Thanks for any help
tmar79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 12:14 PM
  #2
Senior Member
 
pawzaddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 12,135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Sounds like a byb. I would look elsewhere.
Posted via Mobile Device
pawzaddict is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 12:41 PM
  #3
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmar79 View Post
Hi all
We're going to see some golden retriever pups (6weeks old) and i was wondering what kind of things we should be looking out for? or any tips in general?
They have been vet checked (how do i see proof of this?), wormed and front lined...
The parents can be seen and are the family pets, which sounds a plus.
Thanks for any help
They could be great dogs or not depending on how well the breeders have done their work. I have nothing against small breeders, particularly if they do their "homework." In fact a family setting is to me the ideal atmosphere in which to raise a litter.

So in general you want to ask about health tests done on the parents. In the case of Goldens they do tend to have hip displaysia, so a good breeder will have both parents checked and certified by the "OFA" or "PennHip". A good breeder will be able to show you documentation of the parents' ratings. Don't take their word for it. If they do not readily produce the documents then they are not doing their homework. That does not mean they don't love their dogs and otherwise take great care of them or that they are not good/kind people.

Not sure what other heritable diseases run in Goldens that can be pre-screened. Of course you would also want to see the parents and assess their temperaments. That is the parents should be friendly, confident dogs, not skittish, shy or aggressive, but rather come up to you with tail wags and enjoy human interaction.

Of course, the problem here will be that ALL puppies are COMPLETELY IRRESISTIBLE! So even if there are problems, it will be difficult not to put a deposit down. Try to be strong! This is a (hopefully) 10 or more year investment, so getting a healthy puppy, less likely to have hip and other problems, will be a good plan.

Incidentally, the puppy should be at least 8 weeks old before he/she is taken from its littermates and mother.

There is nothing more exciting than getting a new puppy! I hope you find your little dream soon, with this litter or another.

Last edited by Tess; 10-29-2010 at 12:45 PM.
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 10-29-2010, 12:44 PM
  #4
Senior Member
 
pawzaddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 12,135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I want to clarify I do not think all bybs don't care about their dogs, unfortunately people supporting byb is what has allowed such a thing to thrive.

That said, if they have no proof of extensive testing like Tess stated then they are a byb and should not receive business readily.
Posted via Mobile Device
pawzaddict is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 12:52 PM
  #5
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,331
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Yes, a lot of times BYB's are very nice folks who just like their dog and want to have a litter. Often they are completely unaware of the health testing that should be done ahead of time. Their dogs may be excellent, or very poor, and one could not tell just by looking. X-rays are needed to check hips, for example.

There are also the really icky BYB's that are folks trying to make a buck breeding and selling puppies and these operations can skimp on everything from health checks to quality of food.

Some very small breeders are actually competing in showing, and they are breeding to improve the breed, but still only have a litter once or twice a year. It can still be a family environment, but also top notch dogs.

So look for cleanliness of the environment and also try to get a sense of why the family has the litter and how often and for what reasons they are breeding.
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 04:24 PM
  #6
Senior Member
 
Esme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Colorado USA / Jalisco MX
Posts: 6,913
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I second everything Tess said.
Esme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 05:04 PM
  #7
Senior Member
 
Tulip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
"Some very small breeders are actually competing in showing, and they are breeding to improve the breed, but still only have a litter once or twice a year. It can still be a family environment, but also top notch dogs."

That's me! I show, and I'm planning my litter a year in advance to make absoloute sure all of the pedigree is free from genetic problems. I won't produce a litter unless I want a puppy from it, and you cannot believe how hard I'm working just to find the right stud that will not only improve on my bitch but is sound in temper.
Last week I was watching a show and there were a lot of big names about, I was jotting down dogs I liked, making the right connections with people, and I had Maisy with me (She actually sat by my feet, the poor thing, for three hours whilst I photographed and chatted to people) because socialisation for shows is important for her. So the whole time this girl and her dog are sat in front of us, and this dog keeps turning around to play with her, the most adorable thing I've ever seen. I really liked his temper, he was so sweet. Started chatting with a REALLY important name in my breed, really getting along, saying which of his dogs I liked and why, etc., and he said 'Oh, you like Jason?' and then smiled and pointed to the dog Maisy was playing with. It was the dog I'd been admiring on websites, reading criques about, and combing through pedigrees for weeks! And he was there all along messing about with Maisy, gently patting her on the face! Naturally I was overjoyed and said hello, lol!

But yes. Firstly, what do you want in the puppy? Is it your first dog? Would you be able to keep a confident dog in check, and make sure you can offer a timid one the security and firm handling it needs to gain confidence? Bitch or dog - can you deal with seasons or staying dogs if they're not fixed?
When viewing the litter, first of all check they're all free of mites, fleas, and are clean and healthy. If they're happy little sausages glad to greet you, you're on the right track. The most confident puppy will be the first to greet you! And the least will hang back. Aim for the ones that aren't too shy but happy to be handled. Keep your voice calm and quiet so as not to startle them. Pay MORE attention to the mother and dad, study their temper - are they calm, and content?
Run your hands over the chosen pup to check all is healthy and there aren't any lumps or bumps. Check it's happy to be touched all over, as a well-raised puppy should be. Make sure you look at the environment - is the floor well hoovered? Are they in the centre of the house? I would make sure they are, you want a puppy that's used to household noises and people.
Tulip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 05:29 PM
  #8
Senior Member
 
Esme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Colorado USA / Jalisco MX
Posts: 6,913
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Also very good advice from Tulip, I completely forgot about that last part.
Esme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 10:06 PM
  #9
Senior Member
 
crock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NW
Posts: 12,336
Mentioned: 340 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
As mentioned, you are making a long term commitment here! Like Tess said, a pup really should stay with her litter at least for 8 weeks; if the people who have the pups right now are actually sending them home at 6 weeks, run, don't walk away from them! Don't support their poor endeavors at backyard breeding....

Now are you ready to do some reading?!
Here is the Golden Retriever Club of America's main index page on health:
Golden Retriever Club of America - Health Dig into it!

All about Goldens: Golden Retriever Club of America - All About Goldens
Healthy Puppies: Golden Retriever Club of America - Health
Aqcuiring a Golden: Golden Retriever Club of America - All About Goldens
Health Concerns: Golden Retriever Club of America - Health

From the GRCA site "Hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, various eye problems and heart disease are common inherited health issues in Golden Retrievers for which there are screening examinations."

Here's an assortment of questions to ask/things to look for:
Ask about the breeders' vaccinating and worming protocol, as well as what they do to socialize their puppies. Ask about training and what they do with the parents (do they hunt? show? agility? field trials? hunt tests? therapy? etc). Ask to see the health screening results, ie OFA/PennHip, CERF, BAER, etc. Note how they interact with the parents and pups, and how the dogs interact with each other. Check physical condition of everybody and look for things like hernias, over/underbites, general conformation (take a look at the GR's breed standard here: Golden Retriever Club of America - History ). And check out the cleanliness of the environment and ask how they clean the puppy areas. Check out any stimuli in their areas (do they have toys and are they clean/dirty?). Ask about something as simple as do they clip the pups' nails....

Remember... ALL puppies are cute. Don't make an on-the-spot decision, go home and think it over.

Good luck
crock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 10:10 PM
  #10
Senior Member
 
crock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NW
Posts: 12,336
Mentioned: 340 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
You know... considering that you are asking for such general help about buying a puppy, I'd personally recommend waiting to buy a pup until you've had more time to learn about whatever breeds you're interested and what kind of dog will best suit your family. It's helpful to check out reputable breeders, many of whom can be referred through your local AKC club.

And to add to everyone's list of things to look for... make sure no one is missing patches of hair And minimal crusties or tear stains.

Last edited by crock; 10-29-2010 at 10:12 PM.
crock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My friend needs help choosing a dog NyLabGirl Dog Breeds 6 10-12-2009 11:46 PM
Choosing my breed davidevans Dog Breeds 23 08-27-2009 06:43 PM
Pls, help with choosing the dog. punky Dog Breeds 11 08-24-2009 05:33 AM
Choosing where to get your dog from, and what breed? Idalia General Dog Discussion 6 06-08-2009 09:06 PM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.