10 Month Old - Needs More Help At Home

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10 Month Old - Needs More Help At Home

This is a discussion on 10 Month Old - Needs More Help At Home within the Puppy Help forums, part of the Dog Training and Behavior category; Same puppy, Lady has been getting into a few nasty habits we're trying to correct her on. But more advice is always helpful. Lady has ...

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Old 11-09-2014, 03:33 AM
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10 Month Old - Needs More Help At Home

Same puppy, Lady has been getting into a few nasty habits we're trying to correct her on. But more advice is always helpful.

Lady has gotten into two habits, that are just not so cool:

-When you come home, she gets really really excited and starts jumping on people.

What we have been doing:

-Telling her down
-Not giving her any attention when we first come through, so that way we don't encourage the excited behavior
-We're also trying to teach her how to sit when someone first comes through the door, so we can take off our shoes and things. She just needs to learn to be patient and needs to wait

She also has grown this very very odd behavior. Now she doesn't growl at me or bark at me. But she has started to nip at my clothes when I'm about to leave. Not like aggressive nipping or that her mouth is super hard. It's such a weird reaction because as you all know I'm very laidback, I interact with her the least out of everybody, but she has been starting to nip at me when I leave.

I am not sure how to fix that behavior the nipping before I leave.
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Old 11-09-2014, 08:39 AM
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This here helped me a lot when teaching mine not to jump -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lC_OKgQFgzw
Here is a stickie from here that helps a lot as well!
https://www.dogforum.com/training-beh...e-dogs-174673/


This one here is called a Positive interrupter noise and I love it!
It's basically you saying "no" without any, (even the slightest) negativity!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBvPaqMZyo8

I used the above mentioned PI noise whenever my dogs were going to do something they weren't allowed to do (like walking up to the wood bin by the stove to pick up a piece). It's great because to your dogs, this is a positive noise, it just breaks their concentration at that time and then you can use that break by rewarding them for stopping what they were doing and coming to you and then redirect to something else.

Here is one that helped me in general - how to capture calmness -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wesm2OpE_2c

The nipping when you leave, sounds like annoyance and aggravation more than anxiety? What do you think?
Does she show any signs of anxiety and/or stress while you are gone (other than the nipping)?
What do you do when you leave the house? What is she doing? Can you retrace the steps for me?
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Old 11-09-2014, 02:40 PM
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Thanks a bunch about the jumping.

The routine I have when I leave, is we live in an apartment so:

-I put my socks on and my coat in my bedroom
-She's usually resting somewhere, on her makeshift bed, or the floor or she's just playing with her toys
-I leave the bedroom to get my shoes on and she immediately runs over while I'm doing so
-Generally she just watches at first, sometimes I forget something in the bedroom okay often I forget something, so I begin to walk off to my room, and she follows
-This is usually when the nipping happens, when I am walking back to my room to get what I forgot, she begins to nip at my fingers and my clothes
-Then she leaves me alone when I go back into the bedroom
-Then I grab what I forgot and then go back out
-Then she comes back over just to watch me again
-Then I tell her to sit on the carpet area and then I leave
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Old 11-12-2014, 01:14 PM
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Scarlett has also begun to tug at my clothes and steal my socks when she sees that I'm getting ready to leave the house -- but only when I am leaving and L is staying home with her. If we both leave, then she goes into her crate because she gets a peanut butter smeared kong! LOL

I don't see her tugging on my clothes as aggressive or anxious either; she's just peeved it seems that I'm leaving without her and *GASP* leaving her with Daddy. Haha! I give her big hugs and L distracts while I actually leave.

If you are concerned this is turning into Separation anxiety you might try leaving her with a treat dispensing toy when you leave so she comes to see your leaving as not necessarily a bad event.

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Old 11-12-2014, 05:54 PM
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Scarlett has also begun to tug at my clothes and steal my socks when she sees that I'm getting ready to leave the house -- but only when I am leaving and L is staying home with her. If we both leave, then she goes into her crate because she gets a peanut butter smeared kong! LOL

I don't see her tugging on my clothes as aggressive or anxious either; she's just peeved it seems that I'm leaving without her and *GASP* leaving her with Daddy. Haha! I give her big hugs and L distracts while I actually leave.

If you are concerned this is turning into Separation anxiety you might try leaving her with a treat dispensing toy when you leave so she comes to see your leaving as not necessarily a bad event.

Well she has major freakouts if her favorite people leave her. She runs around the house and will cry for an hour or more when they leave and just won't behave for no one until she puppies out and sleeps it off. Then she's normal.
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:14 AM
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Quote:
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Well she has major freakouts if her favorite people leave her. She runs around the house and will cry for an hour or more when they leave and just won't behave for no one until she puppies out and sleeps it off. Then she's normal.
@MindBox This sounds more serious than your initial posting. It does sound like she might be developing Separation Anxiety then if she has a major freakout and only crashes when she completely exhausts herself. There are stickies on this forum about SA and how to deal with that.

The most successful way I have prevented (but not "cured" a pup) from developing SA is to make my leaving a good event. you first have to figure out what motivates your pup. My experience has shown that this is usually food. Start with a high value treat - in our case, peanut butter is what I use and I reserve it ONLY for when I leave so that's the ONLY time she ever gets it.

Do you crate train? If not, I highly recommend starting with that first as the crate (if used well ie. not more than a few/4 hours at a time) will serve to be a safe zone for your pup. Dogs like dens and her crate will come to be her safe place. Scarlett now uses her crate as her safe place even when we're home ie. if the cat is chasing her, or she just wants a quiet place to chew and nap. The crate will then be the safe place she will feel confident in while you are gone and ease her anxiety about your leaving.

There are some good stickies and advice on this forum about crate training. I suggest starting with feeding her her meals in the crate with the door open, then putting her in there with a treat or favorite toy for short periods while you ARE home. IE. when I take a shower, I put the crate in front of the bathroom door, leave the door open so she can see and hear me. There might be a little whining and discomfort for a few minutes but the second she calms down, slide a treat through the mesh. She will come to realize that being calm in the crate earns her something GOOD.

Then, after crate training - be consistent and it won't take more than a few days. I suggest doing this over a weekend/long weekend and plan on staying home the whole time - you can work on the SA using the crate as her safe place.

Begin by leaving only for short periods. Ie. going to get the mail. Then leaving to get a coffee. 5 mins, then 10 mins, then 15 etc. Again, you might want to do this over a long weekend. Thanksgiving is coming up (if you are in the US).

Put her in her crate with a kong or other treat dispensing toy and fill it with something REALLY GOOD. Then leave for a few minutes. Perhaps just into the garage or just out the door. Then make it a little longer next time. When she is calm, return and give her a treat.

You are slowly desensitizing her to your absence and showing that your leaving is accompanied by good things. AND your return is marked by a calm moment so that she knows her whining/antics isn't what causes your return. Start by going slow.

There are many others who have dealt with EXTREME SA on this forum. I suggest reaching out to them. Unfortunately I can't remember their names... I think @pkelley was one? or @SusanLynn ? Sorry, I can't remember who but I know someone has an extreme SA case here.

Good luck!
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Old 11-13-2014, 10:17 PM
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@MindBox This sounds more serious than your initial posting. It does sound like she might be developing Separation Anxiety then if she has a major freakout and only crashes when she completely exhausts herself. There are stickies on this forum about SA and how to deal with that.

The most successful way I have prevented (but not "cured" a pup) from developing SA is to make my leaving a good event. you first have to figure out what motivates your pup. My experience has shown that this is usually food. Start with a high value treat - in our case, peanut butter is what I use and I reserve it ONLY for when I leave so that's the ONLY time she ever gets it.

Do you crate train? If not, I highly recommend starting with that first as the crate (if used well ie. not more than a few/4 hours at a time) will serve to be a safe zone for your pup. Dogs like dens and her crate will come to be her safe place. Scarlett now uses her crate as her safe place even when we're home ie. if the cat is chasing her, or she just wants a quiet place to chew and nap. The crate will then be the safe place she will feel confident in while you are gone and ease her anxiety about your leaving.

There are some good stickies and advice on this forum about crate training. I suggest starting with feeding her her meals in the crate with the door open, then putting her in there with a treat or favorite toy for short periods while you ARE home. IE. when I take a shower, I put the crate in front of the bathroom door, leave the door open so she can see and hear me. There might be a little whining and discomfort for a few minutes but the second she calms down, slide a treat through the mesh. She will come to realize that being calm in the crate earns her something GOOD.

Then, after crate training - be consistent and it won't take more than a few days. I suggest doing this over a weekend/long weekend and plan on staying home the whole time - you can work on the SA using the crate as her safe place.

Begin by leaving only for short periods. Ie. going to get the mail. Then leaving to get a coffee. 5 mins, then 10 mins, then 15 etc. Again, you might want to do this over a long weekend. Thanksgiving is coming up (if you are in the US).

Put her in her crate with a kong or other treat dispensing toy and fill it with something REALLY GOOD. Then leave for a few minutes. Perhaps just into the garage or just out the door. Then make it a little longer next time. When she is calm, return and give her a treat.

You are slowly desensitizing her to your absence and showing that your leaving is accompanied by good things. AND your return is marked by a calm moment so that she knows her whining/antics isn't what causes your return. Start by going slow.

There are many others who have dealt with EXTREME SA on this forum. I suggest reaching out to them. Unfortunately I can't remember their names... I think @pkelley was one? or @SusanLynn ? Sorry, I can't remember who but I know someone has an extreme SA case here.

Good luck!
Thanks.

Yes she has a crate, and we have been using it. Just not really gradually.

I don't rarely leave the house, but when I do we're gone doing errand stuff. So yeah....
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Old 11-13-2014, 10:35 PM
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What helps insanely well for me is to throw treats on the ground to prevent all undesired coming and going behaviours.

You can imagine that walking dogs, I encounter many situations where I must open a door and have one dog go inside a house, and not the other. Or take several dogs into a dog run, and leave without one of them.

If you use small treats like a handful of kibble and throw it on the ground, it scatters and takes the dog longer to pick up. This behaviour is best trained with gates, because you can see what the dog is doing after you shut the gate, and reward that behaviour over the gate. Works great for preventing dogs from hanging around near the door and trying to make a jailbreak when you go to leave.

With work, I can have one dog (yes, even a puppy!) standing in their pen, watching their friends leave through the wide-open gate and not dash. My trick is that I reward the behaviour long, long, long after it has been taught. Months, even. Doesn't have to be anything extravagant, just a few kibbles to say 'yep, I see what you are doing and I can appreciate how much restraint it takes!'
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Old 11-14-2014, 07:46 AM
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Well she has major freakouts if her favorite people leave her. She runs around the house and will cry for an hour or more when they leave and just won't behave for no one until she puppies out and sleeps it off. Then she's normal.
This does sound like anxiety.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGxhcb-itO4

I agree with above mentioned methods. Make leaving a GOOD thing.
Treats galore! Even a toy that suspends treats, a filled Kong, etc.

I recommend the stickies on here and the video I posted.

Good luck and don't hesitate to post any questions you might have about the stickies, the video or anything else!
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Old 11-14-2014, 12:07 PM
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This does sound like anxiety.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGxhcb-itO4

I agree with above mentioned methods. Make leaving a GOOD thing.
Treats galore! Even a toy that suspends treats, a filled Kong, etc.

I recommend the stickies on here and the video I posted.

Good luck and don't hesitate to post any questions you might have about the stickies, the video or anything else!
Thing is in the past we use to give her a Kong full of peanut butter. She loved that thing, it just never distracted her or took her attention away from someone leaving.

Our old routine, which we don't really have the money right now so we ran out of PB:

-Her mother, my sister, would begin to leave the house. Her mother or really the person leaving had the Kong of PB. When they left, she sits at the edge of the carpet, we say yes, we tell her she's good, and the person opens the door to leave and sets down the KONG after she took an interest. They said good girl, closed the door, and then left

-Thing was it took her about 2 minutes before she realized someone was gone before she started to have a whine fit.
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