New puppy: does he need a companion?

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New puppy: does he need a companion?

This is a discussion on New puppy: does he need a companion? within the New Additions forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hi all, I'm the owner of a new GSD male puppy. Also first time dog owner. We're a suburban family of four. As a working ...

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Old 07-11-2019, 08:21 AM
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New puppy: does he need a companion?

Hi all, I'm the owner of a new GSD male puppy. Also first time dog owner.


We're a suburban family of four. As a working couple with busy jobs and kids in school all day long plus classes in the evenings, I know we won't be able to spend as much time with our puppy as he might need.

Heck, he'd probably love it if we worked/played with him 10 hr/day!



We're building a small play pen for him in the kitchen area plus he spends a lot of time on our deck with his toys. Also we have a large fenced in backyard (maybe 1/10th of an acre for the backyard).



So work days are busy but holidays are better when we'd walk him more, take him to a dog park, got for hikes etc.


I saw him play with his two siblings yesterday when we went back to the kennel for a visit and that made me realize we could never play with him as much.


So I'm thinking of getting a second GSD puppy, a girl. That way he'll have a companion for life.

Also I'm ethically conflicted about snipping away his stuff so maybe if he has a girl they could have litters as well.


So what are your thoughts about getting a companion and also not getting them spayed/neutered?


Thanks
Sam
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:54 AM
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Iídsay you would be compounding your issues on both counts. Itís quite hard to train two dogs and although they enjoy play dates itís so much more work and they will both crave individual attention. Iíd be very reluctant to leave a dog intact unless you are an experienced breeder and can manage the multitude of related issues plus give lots and lots of time to raising a litter. Read the posts by Lovemyfosters to see whatís involved.

Instead think about long lasting toys, puzzles, and training to keep your puppy content and if you are all out each day, perhaps a dog walker who can take the dog to the park while you are at work?


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Old 07-11-2019, 09:45 AM
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It's strongly recommended to wait until your first dog is a stable adult to get a second dog, so they both properly bond to you more than to each other. Plus two puppies is a LOT of work.
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Old 07-11-2019, 10:37 AM
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You want to be your dog's companion. Although they love to play with other dogs, you want to bond with your puppy. Getting a female puppy and expecting them to live together and not breed too young is not going to work. Their first season is around 6-9 months, way to young to be bred and there is no way you are going to keep them apart for the female's first two or three seasons when they have been together from the time they are puppies. Not a good idea at all.
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Old Yesterday, 12:44 PM
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Is your post some kind of joke?

[QUOTE=skm.sa100;3620233]Hi all, I'm the owner of a new GSD male puppy. Also first time dog owner.
So I'm thinking of getting a second GSD puppy, a girl. That way he'll have a companion for life.
Also I'm ethically conflicted about snipping away his stuff so maybe if he has a girl they could have litters as well.
So what are your thoughts about getting a companion and also not getting them spayed/neutered?

Response: I spent many years involved with a livestock guardian breed and their club and also mixed breed dog placement. This is your first dog and you are already thinking about breeding the animal without a shred of knowledge about dogs in general or GSD breed specific knowledge, genetics, set up to raise a litter, placement or the fact that you are responsible for taking back the dogs you breed for their lifetime. With being your first dog you lack the most basic understanding of the responsibilities and eithics associated with breeding animals. Your dog isn't a puppy machine. The dog is your companion. Before thinking about another dog the one you have belongs in puppy obedience class and adult classes so you and your dog have a life long bond and mutual trust.

Do not breed any dog unless the animal is breed quality and your dog is a champion in dog shows where expert judges chose your dog in conformation shows. If you purchased your dog through a breeder you received registration papers to register with tthe AKC. The papers will indicate if the breeder determined the dog to be breed quality or pet quality based on the AKC breed standard. https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/german-shepherd-dog/

Another fact is that if you live on R-1 property there is probably a 3 dog limit in your city.

My advise is to start your with puppy class at Petco or Petsmart. They excel with working with new pet owners. Don't get a second dog. Just enjoy and properly raise the one you have now. You indicate you have a busy life. It's more busy with a dog to raise and exercise daily.
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Old Yesterday, 07:54 PM
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Do as I say, not as I do, lol.

I have two puppies even though I already know that this is not ideal for either of them and in general a very BAD idea. Laurel adores Chocolate and couldn't have been happier when she realized the other dog was not going home and was going to be a forever part of our family.

This is very rare and a Laurel thing not a puppy thing.

Regardless of my weird dog, Chocolate is NOT a companion for Laurel to make her life easier, she is a second dog for me to be responsible for. Laurel has backslid in her obedience so far that I almost need to sign her up for Basic Obedience all over again. Chocolate came to us with such horrible separation anxiety and littermate syndrome that she would have been euthanized if we hadn't taken her in.

I am retired and have no children or other pets or I couldn't have done this, but dogs are more like human kids than they are like kittens: two puppies isn't twice the work, it's exponentially more work. The financial end of it is much, much harder since dogs are most expensive during puppyhood and during their "retirement years". What is in Chocolate's best interest is not always in Laurel's best interests.

I have new respect for dogs and wonder how on earth mother dogs manage litters of four and eight puppies without going stark raving mad.

You're a working couple with two kids in school. It's too much to ask of yourselves. When he is two years old would be a good time to consider getting a second dog if and only if you love being a dog owner enough to want to do puppyhood all over again.

As far as the ethical issues of neutering are concerned, let's talk privately; this is controversial and I have already been flamed here for being happy, even though I do not think I have the resources to keep either of my girls intact as much as I wish I could.

You'll need to grow an even thicker skin for your boy, since he will be visibly intact and random strangers may stop you on the street to share their opinions with you, lol.

You don't have to make up your mind right away since your vet has undoubtedly told you the reasons why your GSD does not need and should not be neutered quite as early as standard practice is with smaller breeds.

You are obviously a caring and compassionate person who has the resources, curiosity, research skills, and independant thinking/thick skin to provide your boy with an exceptionally good life. Dog ownership is much more challenging in the 21st century than it was for us when we were kids. Thinking about controversial issues is a good thing, not a bad thing.
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Old Yesterday, 08:07 PM
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ETA:ETA: I do not recomment Petco or Petsmart for puppy classes. Find a reputable trainer and skip your second cup of coffee or whatever other luxury you can do without to pay the trainer. It's an investment in your dog. Chain stores hire well-meaning but inexperienced college students. Ours was neither safe nor helpful for Laurel. The trainer we used instead cost $50 for puppy class, iirc, and another $50 for basic obedience BUT this led to meeting other likeminded dog people and eventually a free get-together every week to practice skills for the Canine Good Citizenship test and a Tricks title. We helped our trainer train her apprentice and found ourselves a community.
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