Which dog for our lifestyle

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Which dog for our lifestyle

This is a discussion on Which dog for our lifestyle within the New Additions forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hi all, I live in the UK and I have a question about which breed of dog, and which age of dog people think might ...

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Old 04-06-2019, 10:28 AM
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Which dog for our lifestyle

Hi all, I live in the UK and I have a question about which breed of dog, and which age of dog people think might suit our lifestyle/family best.

My husband and I work in the same company as archaeologists and have been given permission to bring any new dog we get to site/the office 5 days a week.

Whilst on site the dog will be secured on a long leash in the back of our car (seats down and a separated between the driver's seat and the back) with the boot open with a ramp so it can go in and out (about 1m) to have some variation. Inside the back of the car will be a covered crate with a bed, and toys, and water either inside or outside depending on weather.

The dog can be walked/fed/toileted at 5am before we leave, 7:30 -8am before site starts, 10:30-11am first break, 1:3-2pm second break, 4pm after work ends and 6pm when we get home.

If in the office the timings will be the same but the dog will be in a bed by our computers instead of the car.

Our house is a 2 bed terrace with a small garden, two big parks within 5 minute walk either direction, the beach a 20 minute walk away, and a massive woodland/field (about 20 miles) a 25 minute walk away, so we don't believe the smaller garden will impact the dog a great deal?

We would prefer a smaller/medium dog breed as we don't think a bigger breed would be happy in the smaller space of our house/car/office. We also aren't sure if it would be better to adopt or get a puppy or an older dog?

As for existing pets we have two bearded dragons who's cages are in the conservatory. They come out separately but can obviously be kept away from the dog whilst out if need be.

I know this is a super long post so sorry everyone! If anyone has any suggestions on dog type etc. Please leave a reply!
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:46 PM
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That sounds like a really awesome life for the right dog!

Do you and your husband have any experience having dogs? Have either of you ever had a puppy before?

Have you thought about what kind of personality you're looking for? Are you up for being shadowed room to room, a dog watching your every move and wanting to touch you as often as possible? Are you more looking for a laid back pup that'll lay off to the side and just keep a watchful eye?

Have you thought about what kind of energy level you're up for? Not just how much you might be able to give, but the day to day effort you wan to be putting in. How much training are you wanting to put in to this dog?

Any puppy is going to take ~2-3 years to "even out". Adolescence wages war on all the training you *thought* your puppy had retained. You just aren't going to get real steadfast reliability before a dog does some maturing. Raising a puppy is HARD. People who haven't been the main caretaker of a puppy are always shocked at how much work it really is, especially those who had puppies growing up but weren't the main caretaker. Now, don't get me wrong, I love raising my dogs from puppyhood. I prefer to start with a puppy myself. But for many people, it's just not worth the upfront effort, and there are plenty of adult dogs looking for homes.

In terms of whether to rescue or buy from a breeder, I think a lot of that comes down to:
1) whether you want a puppy
2) whether you want to be able to have a decent idea of likely adult temperament and what issues you may be likely to run into
3) whether you want to weigh the balance in favor of avoiding certain health issues

If you want a puppy, but also want predictable adult temperament, a rescue dog is difficult because you can't really predict adult temperament from a puppy. If you want a puppy but don't care as much about predictability, then a rescue pup may be for you. If you care strongly about avoiding certain health issues (allergies, skin issues, and orthopedic concerns are the ones that come to mind most strongly), then going with a breeder who is doing health screening on their dogs as well as tracking health in their lines might be a good bet. If you're OK with a little less predictability on health and don't really want a puppy, then a 2-3 rescue dog can give you more predictability in temperament. Also consider the cost of buying from a breeder will likely be substantially higher than adopting from a rescue. If a breeder if proving their dogs and doing relevant health testing, then there's good reason for this.

I would suggest putting together a little more of an idea of what traits you're looking for in a dog, how much exercise you're looking to give every day, what kind of activities you're most looking forwards to, thinking about how much training and effort you want to put in (i.e., are you ready to spend the next 2 years with an eye on the dog at all times), and what kind of look you like in a dog (a much smaller part, but still relevant and helps narrow down suggestions for purebreds).

If you do decide not to go with a breeder, then you have a great jumping off point to start with in looking for a rescue. Any good rescue will be *thrilled* you're coming in with a good idea of what kind of dog you want.
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Old 04-06-2019, 04:27 PM
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@Moonstream, thank you for this post! I really like your reply, very thought provoking. I wish everyone who is even thinking of adopting a dog or pup would read this!!

And I agree with you---puppies are hard work!!!!!!! OMG I had no idea how much work raising a puppy could be until I adopted/rescued our Puma pup. Wow! But then again, I am huge on training, conditioning, ensuring my dogs have beautiful manners, and are safe out in public, etc. So lots and lots and lots of time, energy, love and work!!!!

I guess I have always adopted older dogs (not puppies) so I had no idea what I was in store for, time wise. Most of my spare time goes to working with my dogs, esp the newer pup. And yes, like in the above post, it is very, very different to be the primary caretaker of a dog even if you grew up with dogs in your family. Huge responsibility.

Anyway, I have nothing to add here at the moment, just wanted to thank you @Moonstream for the great post!
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Old 04-10-2019, 07:22 PM
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I really like Moonstream's response. There's no "perfect dog" just like there are no "perfect owners". But if you narrow down your choices as Moonstream suggests, you will find the Exact Right Dog for YOUR FAMILY for NOW. Guaranteed!

My wife and I decided to adopt rescued pugs from a local society that rescues only that breed. (Pugs have very uniform friendly, cuddly temperaments) We indeed have the PERFECT PUGS FOR US. We are head over heels in love with Bubbles and Maddie. Bubbles is 6, a black male, with a lot of puppy energy, and Maddie is 11, a fawn female. Could not be happier but we went through quite a process to get here. Hope it works out great for you also!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstream View Post
That sounds like a really awesome life for the right dog!

Do you and your husband have any experience having dogs? Have either of you ever had a puppy before?

Have you thought about what kind of personality you're looking for? Are you up for being shadowed room to room, a dog watching your every move and wanting to touch you as often as possible? Are you more looking for a laid back pup that'll lay off to the side and just keep a watchful eye?

Have you thought about what kind of energy level you're up for? Not just how much you might be able to give, but the day to day effort you wan to be putting in. How much training are you wanting to put in to this dog?

Any puppy is going to take ~2-3 years to "even out". Adolescence wages war on all the training you *thought* your puppy had retained. You just aren't going to get real steadfast reliability before a dog does some maturing. Raising a puppy is HARD. People who haven't been the main caretaker of a puppy are always shocked at how much work it really is, especially those who had puppies growing up but weren't the main caretaker. Now, don't get me wrong, I love raising my dogs from puppyhood. I prefer to start with a puppy myself. But for many people, it's just not worth the upfront effort, and there are plenty of adult dogs looking for homes.

In terms of whether to rescue or buy from a breeder, I think a lot of that comes down to:
1) whether you want a puppy
2) whether you want to be able to have a decent idea of likely adult temperament and what issues you may be likely to run into
3) whether you want to weigh the balance in favor of avoiding certain health issues

If you want a puppy, but also want predictable adult temperament, a rescue dog is difficult because you can't really predict adult temperament from a puppy. If you want a puppy but don't care as much about predictability, then a rescue pup may be for you. If you care strongly about avoiding certain health issues (allergies, skin issues, and orthopedic concerns are the ones that come to mind most strongly), then going with a breeder who is doing health screening on their dogs as well as tracking health in their lines might be a good bet. If you're OK with a little less predictability on health and don't really want a puppy, then a 2-3 rescue dog can give you more predictability in temperament. Also consider the cost of buying from a breeder will likely be substantially higher than adopting from a rescue. If a breeder if proving their dogs and doing relevant health testing, then there's good reason for this.

I would suggest putting together a little more of an idea of what traits you're looking for in a dog, how much exercise you're looking to give every day, what kind of activities you're most looking forwards to, thinking about how much training and effort you want to put in (i.e., are you ready to spend the next 2 years with an eye on the dog at all times), and what kind of look you like in a dog (a much smaller part, but still relevant and helps narrow down suggestions for purebreds).

If you do decide not to go with a breeder, then you have a great jumping off point to start with in looking for a rescue. Any good rescue will be *thrilled* you're coming in with a good idea of what kind of dog you want.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:52 AM
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These are some dogs where they can adjust in evey lifestyle that you are living:
German Shepherds.
Beagles.
Poodles.
Huskies.
Golden Retrievers.
Maltese.
Newfoundland Dog.
Portuguese Water Dog.
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Old 10-08-2019, 09:30 PM
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Oh, if only more people had such a great situation for a dog! Most dogs will thrive in the situation you described. Adult or senior dog though, not a puppy.

If you're open to having a senior dog I strongly encourage that. Senior dogs are so deserving, but they get looked over in shelters and rescues for the younger dogs. And the feeling you'll get for giving a senior dog a good and happy forever home is priceless. A senior dog would love to have the kind of constant companionship that you described. They would be going on a lot of adventures, but the kind of adventure that isn't too taxing on them.

You should contact a shelter or rescue group and describe your situation and see what they recommend. You don't need to seek a specific breed. You just need a personality that works with your life. If I had you here, I would jump on the chance to introduce you to more mature dogs that desperately desire a home.

Last edited by DogFaming; 10-08-2019 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 10-10-2019, 12:23 AM
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These responses are awesome!

I would have to agree with DogFaming. I think your best bet would be an adult or senior dog. You would definitely get a better idea of what kind of temperament they’ll have and which dog would best suit your day-to-day. Their suggestion to contact a shelter for advice is also a really good idea!

Bringing a puppy to work could be seriously overwhelming. I got my dog when she was a puppy and although I’m glad I did, the training and typical puppy accidents (whether that be things that shouldn’t have been chewed or potty accidents) were definitely not my favorite parts. I can’t imagine training/watching a puppy while on the job.

Wish you the best of luck on your search!

Last edited by KopiTheDog; 10-10-2019 at 12:26 AM.
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