Horse books! - what R U reading /Have U read, the great, the awful, the good stuff?

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Horse books! - what R U reading /Have U read, the great, the awful, the good stuff?

This is a discussion on Horse books! - what R U reading /Have U read, the great, the awful, the good stuff? within the Horses forums, part of the Other Pets and Animals category; . with my new job [thank Goddess], I am less penurious, & i indulged in some book-buying. I bought a 2nd copy of The Color ...

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Old 12-13-2017, 07:57 AM
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Talking Horse books! - what R U reading /Have U read, the great, the awful, the good stuff?

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with my new job [thank Goddess], I am less penurious, & i indulged in some book-buying.

I bought a 2nd copy of The Color of Horses: A Scientific & Authoritative Identification of the Color of the Horse by Ben K. Green
because I saw one available, & they don't come up often - my 1st beloved copy was ruined by a plumbing leak, I was so happy to replace it! - & this one's in gorgeous shape, too.
This is a fantastic reference IMO, full of useful tidbits about the qualities of horses of specific colors - such as their endurance, any tendency to harness or saddle galls, color & hoof toughness, & more.

During his lifetime, Ben Green was known as a "horse doctor" & may or may not have been a schooled veterinarian, but he was 'Doc Green' to all & sundry, & many vets consulted him when they had puzzling cases - so schooled or not, he was deeply educated about horses & their anatomy, physiology, illnesses, & injuries - plus, & in my eyes most-important, their behavior as a species, & their capabilities as individuals.
No one could [or should] do today what he did, diagnosing & treating horses with questionable credentials - but he was dam*ed good at it, & many people, plus their equines, were grateful for his care.
It was a different era, vets were practically nonexistent for many square-miles, & anyone who could help a suffering animal when transportation & labor WAS the horse, was a Godsend in ranch country.

4 hooves up!

- terry

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Old 12-13-2017, 08:02 AM
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Arrow 'A thousand miles of mustangin'

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While purchasing it, I saw other Ben Green books, & after my 1st paycheck was deposited, I bought 2 -
the 1st one that i read was A Thousand Miles of Mustangin',
in which he talks about traveling large parts of western Texas, particularly the Big Bend area, catching wild horses, trading horses, & selling a few. // It's the depths of the Depression, ca$h is scarce & precious, & he spends most of his time camping in lean-tos he builds himself, or in abandoned ranches or farmsteads.

NOTE:
'Doc' Green was a mighty knowledgeable man, but there are practices here that we'd consider cruel - e-g, putting a silk-Manila hackamore on a just-caught mustang, & tying her to a tree to fight it out.
There's also an accidental killing - 3 young horses are caught by rope-traps set by a Mexican peasant, who's helping Ben; one colt chokes himself, bucking & getting wrapped around a tree.
But there are also very savvy techniques, such as roping broke-&-set-to-roam burros as "weights" for flighty young horses when Ben must go to town - the burros keep the young mares from running off, & nobody gets hurt or lost. Burros were cheap & durable, & local Mexicans would catch & use one, then turn 'em loose vs keep & feed them, once the job was done - there was a constant supply of former-harness or ex-riding burros, roaming the country & feeding themselves.

this book is a time & a place that won't come again, with a cast of characters that includes all manner of people, indigenous & immigrants; Ben makes a deal with the Yacqui elders to catch wild horses on their land, & learns a thing or 3 about Yacqui culture [he knew they didn't ride - they RAN - but he didn't know the youths who'd gather & wear-down the mustangs for him would be girls, not young men - the elders kindly point out that the teenaged girls don't get distracted by wild game & abandon the horses to hunt, don't forget what their job is & spend the day sleeping in the heat, are lighter & faster than the boys would be, & more responsible].

He also gets a serious injury to his roping-hand, when a wild horse bites it & gives him a huge de-gloving - an elderly woman treats the swollen, thumping, red-streaked mass, & he not only survives, his hand recovers completely, which is quite incredible.

All in all, a great story of the west-Texas range, the land, the local denizens, human & non-human, & some adventures in the mid-1930s. Well-worth reading.

4-hooves up for this one, as a slice of history. West Texas & all its inhabitants come to life, in this book.

- terry

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Old 12-13-2017, 08:07 AM
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I've noticed in the horse community there are many different types of people. Some people who will rush their horse off to the vet for the slightest misstep and others who rely on good ole old school horse knowledge and experience. While I am usually more like the first person, the people I ride with are older (in their 60's) and have worked, owned, ridden, and trained horses their whole lives. I am constantly amazed by the knowledge they have. Now don't get me wrong, if a problem is beyond them they are more then willing to get a vet out, but they've handled everything from major cuts to foot issues with ease. Sometimes there just isn't a replacement for good ole fashion work.
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Old 12-13-2017, 08:17 AM
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Arrow 'Horse Conformation as to soundness & performance'

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the Doc Green book i'm currently reading is Horse Conformation as to soundness & performance -
i'm less than a third into it, but it appears to be another winner, explaining clearly & succinctly what to look for, as good & bad points of structure.

What's a good head? - a bad head? What does the head do, for a horse, besides serve as a setting for eyes, ears, nose, & jaws?
How long is a good neck? What's wrong with a ewe-neck, & why? What's wrong with a crested mare's neck, or a gelding with a lot of crest?

The anatomical drawings of overall skeleton & joint details are excellent; the sketches that compare horses of various type are very clear & understandable, greatly enhancing the reader's understanding of the effect on function of different proportions. I am learning a tremendous amount, such as the layback of the shoulder determining the horse's forward reach, & thus stride length, whether they're agile or prone to stumble, & so on.

I'm sure this is going to be another keeper. The amount of info packed into this short book, less than 100 pgs, is astonishing.

- terry

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Old 12-18-2017, 10:22 AM
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Congrats on the new job @leashedForLife!

I don't have time to read for pleasure much these days but I do keep a list of books that I'll be reading once I'm done with school! I haven't come across a horse related book in a while that piqued my interest.
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Old 12-18-2017, 11:39 AM
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Thumbs up 'Horse Tradin'...'

.

started another Ben Green book, 'Horse tradin'', & i've learned quite a lot from it, already.

Unfortunately, the book was misrepresented as 'very good cond'n' - the spine is broken in half, which i didn't discover until, while reading it in bed, i kept finding little bits of yellow-white flaky stuff on the grey-on-grey pinstriped sheets... hmm.
Then there was a sudden snowfall of yellow-white stuff that came out & made a small pile, & i thot, OH, NO! - SILVERFISH... but no, the spine of the hardback was broken in 2, & hunks of glue, broken spine-edges of the sewn pages, & other detritus was falling out.

I can get it repaired, but that won't be cheap - however, the book is worth keeping, so it's worth fixing. Meanwhile, i've secured the smaller broken segment to a good hunk of the rest of the pages, with a rubber band wrapped clear 'round the front cover & 50 or 60-pages past the split, to prevent any more damage.

Doc's not afraid to tell tales on himself, he got taken by a pair of mules that were represented as 8-YO, they'd been given fake dapples & their teeth had been re-worked to add a corner cusp. They were lovely mules to work & drive, but their color ran when they sweated & then it rained - they were 14, if they were a day.
He got the fella back that took him in, tho. It took him a few months, but he did it.

- terry

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