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Young Dog Chasing Issues and More

This is a discussion on Young Dog Chasing Issues and More within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Originally Posted by Markie There should be little quote marks when you click on the option of someones. You click on those then it quotes ...

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Old 10-28-2017, 08:18 PM
  #21
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Originally Posted by Markie View Post
There should be little quote marks when you click on the option of someones. You click on those then it quotes the person for you :-):-) Don't worry it took me forever to figure it out myself and Anytime with helping :-):-):-)
Thank you!!
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:49 PM
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I'm confused - U say that U've always had dogs, but have no experience in training them. U have 2 adult dogs now, if i read this correctly, plus the recently-adopted pup.
Who trained those senior dogs? - or all their predecessors?
Were they all adopted, as already-trained adults?


Ok, let me elaborate. I'm currently 16, and my mom and dad have trained our dogs in the past. The dogs in our past just needed basic obidience training and we had enough money to set aside to pay for that. What I meant mostly though, is that none of us have expirience training dogs with these particular behavioral issues. My family is extremely busy, and money is tight right now. Obviously, I'm busy in school right now as well, and was having trouble figuring out where to start with this pup (lot's of different training to do), and when I would find time in my day to do it. I love animals, and always try to be as responsible/caring/informed as I can... I just have never dealt with a dog with these problems before.




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Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
What's the house / apt like? - is there an upstairs & a ground floor?
Since the dog must go outdoors to toilet, it's generally easiest to cede the upstairs to the cats, their food & water bowls, & their litter boxes [3 cats, 4 boxes - 1 per cat, + 1 spare].
If the cats don't stop running, there's no hope that the dog will stop chasing. // U need to work with one cat at a time, in a carrier, up off the floor, with the dog on leash.
The only other option is 24 / 7 separation of dog & cats - & at some point, accidents happen; a door is not latched properly, the cats learn to open the doorknob, a visitor doesn't lock the baby-gate, _____ .


Our house has two story's. The cats food, toys, cat tree, and litter boxes are upstairs. I know that the cat's running is a big part of the problem, it triggers her instincts to chase. We will try the cats in the carrier/dog on leash approach. It's been difficult to introduce them properly because the cats just run and hide. We don't want them to be separate all the time, we want them to live in harmony.

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Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
Have the senior dogs ever played with any other dogs? - What do they do when the bigger puppy "tramples" them?
Do they growl, give her a hard stare, snarl-bark, yelp sharply?... What?
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The senior dogs have played with other dogs before, but in their old age, have mellowed out a lot. In the past, the other dogs they did play with, weren't as big/overbearing as Sophie. One of our older dogs just cowers/runs and the other growls back at her. I think the problem is that 1, they are older dogs now and do not have the same energy levels anymore, and 2, Sophie plays pretty rough - jumping on them, nipping, etc.




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Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
oh, dear. It's not her age - she doesn't listen to simple cues because she hasn't been taught what they mean, & then rewarded for doing those taught behaviors on request. She doesn't speak English, or any other human language; she's ignorant of what the noises from our mouths mean.
She's not disobeying deliberately - she's never been to school, & has no idea what she's spozed to do when told to "gfluggert".
Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post


I figured that was what was happening. The person who was rehoming her pretty much just left her outside when there was an issue. The only cue she knows is "sit", and even then, it's not completely ingrained in her mind.

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Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
About "the bowl" - Am i misunderstanding, or are 2 dogs eating from ONE bowl?
If so, that's not apropos - dogs eat solo; only dams tolerate their own young pups sampling their food, for a brief time, maybe 10-days or so; when the pups begin to EAT as opposed to 'taste' solid food, Mom-dog will growl; smart breeders have pups eat from their own bowls, long-before their dam feels she needs to protect her own calories from her kids.

Set the dogs up with individual bowls, well-separated - if need be, crate both the possessive dogs [senior & pup], each with their own bowl in their own crate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post



yes, that pretty much covers it. Dogs are not born trained, we humans must teach them -- if U don't or can't, then U pay someone else to do it. Otherwise, the dog doesn't get trained, & is increasingly difficult to live with, as new problem behaviors develop over time.

training doesn't have to be "complicated regimens", but it needs to be done - it takes time, consistency, & patience. Most owners find it extremely rewarding, once they start to see progress - & that doesn't take very long.
With good, simple training methods, U can see a dog start to learn the 1st day, even the 1st hour.

- terry

There are two separate bowls, but they always want to eat from the one the other dog is eating from. I'm going to start feeding them at regulary set intervals - separately. I think it will solve the food problem. I was definitely planning on training her, and I really just needed some advice on where to start. It's very overwhelming right now. That's the only reason I have been floundering around - I don't know how or if I'll do it right once I start. Not because I can't be bothered.

Thanks for the help.
Lauren
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:55 PM
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So - I have a piano lesson to get to, but I wanted to thank all of you for your reply's and help! I don't have time right now to respond to everyone, but I'm extremely thankful.
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Old 10-28-2017, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Markie View Post
I guess so :-);-) You must have defied all of them also ;-)

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I think it is important that I make mention of a few things. I have only had one dog at a time and I have had all my dogs from pups (8-10 weeks). For those who have more than one dog, rescue dogs, taking in an older dog, other animals living with their dog(s) and any other scenario besides a single dog ( as a pup ) in their family, I believe it can be much more difficult to keep the peace in these situations. So, it has been infinitely easier for me and I have a great respect for those in the previously mentioned situations who have been able to get their dog(s) to peacefully coexist with all involved. I think what has helped me the most in my easier situation is to guide the pup in its behavior from day one toward the proper behavior I desire once the pup is an adult. I only apply this to basic practical behavior which a pup can handle and keep my expectations reasonable.
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Old 10-28-2017, 09:27 PM
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Talking Advanced studies.



Clicker-training a dog to teach not just tolerance of a cat, but eventual acceptance -

https://clickertraining.com/node/1403

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Old 10-28-2017, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by LaurenS77 View Post
Thank you!!
I just wanted to tell you that you can do this even with everything in your life you have going on. A puppy of your own that you train will be a very joyful thing :-):-):-)

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Old 10-29-2017, 06:17 PM
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A couple more suggestions that I didn't see mentioned that might help make things less stressful for you and the other animals...
Try using tie downs to let her hang out with you while not mugging the other animals in the house. Like this: http://hssv.convio.net/site/DocServe...pdf?docID=1124 The tie down denies her the option (and reward!) of chasing, while allowing your other animals to be around her without feeling on guard. This in turn will make their behavior less enticing (cats will be less inclined to flee, dogs will not be constantly annoyed by her), and you can work on her behavior in closer proximity to them (on leash) as you have time. I would try to teach a cue for orienting to me- specifically away from the cats (I use, "no cat" for my parents' dog- though I didn't train it through exclusively +R means, I'm sure it can be), and reward heavily for compliance, even if she only looks at me (which means she's not chasing the cat- yay!), but doesn't physically walk toward me. You can also reinforce it on the tie down when the cats walk through by using the cue/command and then tossing a treat to her. You could also use baby gates, but then you would have to walk through/over, and your older dogs might be restricted as well. Baby gate(s) might be a viable option to separate them occasionally for a break, or for eating.

You might try using a flirt pole (like this: flirt pole) to exercise her if she enjoys chasing, and you can practice impulse control (not chasing unless told "ok", calling her off of the chase), which should carry over to "real life" applications as well.

As for the food, the easiest and probably safest thing is to separate for eating. That's not to say that you can't work to make her more tolerant of other dogs around her while she has (or may get) food, as you certainly can, and eventually should, in case of dropped food in the kitchen, etc.

I would avoid training these sort of scenarios (cat chasing and food aggression) as a "sheriff enforcing rules" sort of thing, as the problem is that like people, dogs will violate the rules when the sheriff isn't around, or isn't directly watching, and NO one is 100% vigilant 100% of the time. If she's only chasing the cats to play or check them out, it might not matter, but it could be an issue if she is predatory toward the cats, or in the case of the food aggression. I had a dog with significant levels of animal aggression, and while she went months without bothering my smaller dog (after months of "practice" at ignoring said dog) while under supervision, it didn't prevent her from crunching said dog during a period of insufficient supervision from me. It was a conglomeration of events- small dog invaded the offender's sleeping space (which I would have prevented had I been there), and offending dog snatched her up and shook her as I darted in from across the hallway. Luckily my small dog wasn't significantly injured, but from that point, I was acutely aware that my interference was the only thing preventing injury to the small dog when the two were in proximity (in light of that, they were separated unless on leash, and even then, not allowed to interact). Policing dogs' behavior may work most of the time, but if the dog wants something or to do something badly enough, they will do so regardless of being policed.

I actually do agree that the first photo of the huskies doesn't appear to show two dogs who are relaxed about eating in close proximity, though it's but a moment in time, not sure it's the best example. Part of it could be that the dogs are sort of facing off, rather than parallel, which tends to increase conflict, but the B/W dog from that angle looks to be side eyeing the red, and the red looks to be stretching in for his food, ready to back off if things go south. They may not be looking to fight, but they do not appear to be at ease, either. I have a dog who occasionally guards high value food/treats from other animals (not people), and I would intervene if I saw this exchange, because I'd rather be safe than sorry, and prevent him from practicing even mild RG behavior.

You might check with your local shelters, as many of them offer free or low cost training classes, or may have connections with a local trainer. Time would still be an issue, but most classes are once a week or so, with "homework" between.
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Old 10-29-2017, 06:36 PM
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Talking Tethers are terrific.

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post

A couple more suggestions that I didn't see mentioned that might help make things less stressful for you and the other animals...

Try using tie downs to let her hang out with you while not mugging the other animals in the house.
...
The tie down denies her the option (and reward!) of chasing, while allowing your other animals to be around her without feeling on guard. This in turn will make their behavior less enticing (cats will be less inclined to flee, dogs will not be constantly annoyed by her), and you can work on her behavior in closer proximity to them (on leash) as you have time.
...


seconding @busannie - tethers are great training-tools in many situations. Impulse-control, over-attachment /velcro dogs, predatory behavior, & more.

here's another helpful article on how-to & tethers -
Tethered to Success | Kerry Blue Terrier Foundation

- terry


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