Young Dog Chasing Issues and More

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Young Dog Chasing Issues and More

This is a discussion on Young Dog Chasing Issues and More within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hi everyone, my family recently adopted a 6-month old puppy. We adopted her from someone who was rehoming her, and unfortunately, the person wasn't very ...

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Old 10-27-2017, 11:50 PM
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Question Young Dog Chasing Issues and More

Hi everyone, my family recently adopted a 6-month old puppy. We adopted her from someone who was rehoming her, and unfortunately, the person wasn't very honest about her behavior. We have had dogs all our lives, and have gotten extremely lucky with no HUGE behavior issues before. We've had her for around 2 months now, and there are several issues. We have 3 cats, and she will chase them constantly. It's gotten to the point where she cannot be off her leash around them, and most of the time she is in a completely separate room from them. It's a big issue because our cats now mostly hide, and we cannot enjoy having Sophie (The puppy) around. She get's into a frenzy, and she absolutely HAS to chase the cat. It doesn't help that the cats run from her, but I can hardly blame them. It's similar with the other dogs in our home, she is always trying to play with them (they are elder dogs) and pretty much tramples them because she's bigger than them both. She's completely overbearing. She also doesn't listen to simple commands, which could be because she's so young. We're not at the point where we need to rehome her, and that would be our absolute last resort. Also, recently she has become possessive/slightly aggressive about the food bowl. We have another dog who is (slightly) possessive over food - and Sophie doesn't like sharing the food with her. Everything I find when I look up is either paying for professional training or complicated training regimens to do yourself. I have no experience in training dogs. I will definitely try my best if I need to, but I was hoping this forum could provide some insight/advice. Sorry for the long message! Thank you for any help.
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:39 AM
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I've dealt with a couple of dogs like this...as far as feeding time they are all separated, with the puppy eating in his crate! And for the cats, I always introduced mine slowly, yes the dogs would have to be leashed when the cats were around but they could drag the leash as long as they left the cats alone, if not then they had to be tethered to me, it takes some time and patience, but eventually they all got along... I also have safe places for the cat, the upstairs is gated off so only the she can get through and we cut a kitty door in the basement door so she has an escape...I do think you would both benefit from puppy class, it will help you to bond with her and you can voice your concerns about her behavior to the trainer!!
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Old 10-28-2017, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenS77 View Post

...my family recently adopted a 6-month old puppy.
We adopted her from someone who was rehoming her, and unfortunately, the person wasn't very honest about her behavior.

We've had dogs all our lives, & been extremely lucky with no HUGE behavior issues before.
... I have no experience in training dogs. I will definitely try my best if I need to, but I was hoping this forum could provide some insight / advice.
...


I'm confused - U say that U've always had dogs, but have no experience in training them. U have 2 adult dogs now, if i read this correctly, plus the recently-adopted pup.
Who trained those senior dogs? - or all their predecessors?
Were they all adopted, as already-trained adults?


Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenS77 View Post

We've had her for around 2 months, & there are several issues.
- We have 3 cats, and she'll chase them constantly. ...she cannot be off her leash around them, and most of the time, she's in a completely separate room from them.
...our cats now mostly hide, and we cannot enjoy having Sophie (the puppy) around. She gets into a frenzy, & absolutely HAS to chase the cat. It doesn't help that the cats run from her, but I can hardly blame them.

It's similar with the other dogs in our home, she always tries to play with them (they're seniors) & pretty much tramples them -- she's bigger than them both. She's completely overbearing.


What's the house / apt like? - is there an upstairs & a ground floor?
Since the dog must go outdoors to toilet, it's generally easiest to cede the upstairs to the cats, their food & water bowls, & their litter boxes [3 cats, 4 boxes - 1 per cat, + 1 spare].
If the cats don't stop running, there's no hope that the dog will stop chasing. // U need to work with one cat at a time, in a carrier, up off the floor, with the dog on leash.
The only other option is 24 / 7 separation of dog & cats - & at some point, accidents happen; a door is not latched properly, the cats learn to open the doorknob, a visitor doesn't lock the baby-gate, _____ .

Have the senior dogs ever played with any other dogs? - What do they do when the bigger puppy "tramples" them?
Do they growl, give her a hard stare, snarl-bark, yelp sharply?... What?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenS77 View Post

She also doesn't listen to simple commands, which could be because she's so young.
We're not at the point where we need to rehome her - that would be our absolute last resort.

Also, recently she's become possessive/ slightly aggressive about the food bowl.
We have another dog who is (slightly) possessive over food - and Sophie doesn't like sharing the food with [the older dog].


oh, dear. It's not her age - she doesn't listen to simple cues because she hasn't been taught what they mean, & then rewarded for doing those taught behaviors on request. She doesn't speak English, or any other human language; she's ignorant of what the noises from our mouths mean.
She's not disobeying deliberately - she's never been to school, & has no idea what she's spozed to do when told to "gfluggert".

About "the bowl" - Am i misunderstanding, or are 2 dogs eating from ONE bowl?
If so, that's not apropos - dogs eat solo; only dams tolerate their own young pups sampling their food, for a brief time, maybe 10-days or so; when the pups begin to EAT as opposed to 'taste' solid food, Mom-dog will growl; smart breeders have pups eat from their own bowls, long-before their dam feels she needs to protect her own calories from her kids.

Set the dogs up with individual bowls, well-separated - if need be, crate both the possessive dogs [senior & pup], each with their own bowl in their own crate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenS77 View Post

Everything I find when I look it up is either pay for professional training, or complicated training regimens to do yourself.


yes, that pretty much covers it. Dogs are not born trained, we humans must teach them -- if U don't or can't, then U pay someone else to do it. Otherwise, the dog doesn't get trained, & is increasingly difficult to live with, as new problem behaviors develop over time.

training doesn't have to be "complicated regimens", but it needs to be done - it takes time, consistency, & patience. Most owners find it extremely rewarding, once they start to see progress - & that doesn't take very long.
With good, simple training methods, U can see a dog start to learn the 1st day, even the 1st hour.

- terry

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Old 10-28-2017, 12:16 PM
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Lightbulb a great DIY resource...



She's not a baby, but she's very late starting 'school' - here's a terrific resource for what to teach pups, how to teach it, manners, & more:

Free downloads | Dog Star Daily

The 2 free books are chock-full of good information, & Dr Dunbar never suggests painful tools, confrontation, etc - these are safe, humane methods.



there are also:

Downloadable articles
- Fight:Bite Ratio
- ALL SHELTER DOGS WERE ONCE NORMAL PUPPIES
- Basic Instinct
- Retreat & Treat
- Chewtoy List
- The Key to Kibble
- Sit List
- Puppy Personality Development
- Open Paw’s Guide To The First Two Weeks With Your New Dog
- Lure Reward Training
- Dialogue With Amy Tan
- Dialogue With Eddie
- Dialogue With Omaha Beagle
- Body Language

Behavior blueprints
- Walking On Leash
- Puppy Training
- Puppy Biting
- New Adult Dog
- HyperDog!
- Home Alone
- Fighting With Dogs
- Fear of People
- Excessive Barking
- Dogs & Children
- Digging Problems
- Destructive Chewing
- Come - Sit - Down - Stay
- Cat Manners
- Housetraining
- New Puppy


All the highlighted titles should help - at 6-MO, she's roughly equivalent to a 12 to 15-YO girl, in terms of physical maturity, so she's not an infant - but she's had no instruction, so i highlighted "new puppy" along WITH "new adult dog", as both apply.

"Cat manners" should help, too.
Oh! - & if she hasn't been spayed, i'd do that ASAP. She could enter estrus any day, & that would really complicate things.

- terry

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Old 10-28-2017, 02:18 PM
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Hi!! I'm going to do this one thing at a time :-) Six month old puppy chasing cats not completely unheard of. Every time the puppy get any where near the cat make it get away from it immediately no waiting . You could also open up windows for the cats to go on to get away from the puppy.

Aggressive guarding of the food bowl stay with the puppy whole it eats. Pet it while it's eating and drinking that helps a lot go from tail to top of the head and make sure I knows it's food is safe. Once she allows you to do that with no growling or anything slowly bring the dog food bowls to where they are about a foot apart for all of them. Dont let her get in the other dogs space teach her to respect boundaries.

Her playing with the other two again puppy she doesn't realize they don't like it all she is seeing is someone to play with. I suggest maybe bring a friends dog over for her to play with that is more in her age group and wants to play or you can go to their house to play there. She is releasing her energy by playing which is something you want :-)

Training needs to start as soon as possible don't wait on that either. I found some videos for just for the basics once you get this taught you can slowly move up with everything. Sit, Down, and recall. It's really not that difficult once you get started. It just has be constant and always the same. :-):-) One thing I will say is don't get frustrated it takes time puppies aren't born knowing what we want. Take a deep breath :-):-):-)
https://youtu.be/Rcjn8v5nfDU

https://youtu.be/hHKtUp9-xbc

https://youtu.be/w525cY5FP7k
I believe the more you play and teach her basic obedience the more she will respect your wishes as you will be keeping her busy play time and mental training always a positive thing for young puppies to have. If you want a break from her every once and a while I suggest a kennel I use show wire kennels at my house for my young puppies so I can see ever move they make. :-):-)

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Old 10-28-2017, 05:39 PM
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Arrow Loom over her, & *pet* her while she eats? - Eek.

Quote:
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...
Aggressive guarding of the food bowl:
stay with the puppy while she eats. Pet her while she's eating & drinking - that helps a lot; go from tail to top of the head, & make sure [she] knows [her] food is safe.

Once she allows you to do that with no growling or anything, slowly bring the dog food bowls to where they are about a foot apart for all of them.
Don't let her get in the other dogs' space --- teach her to respect boundaries.
...

@Markie -
please explain how it "helps" a young dog, who is already worried about threats she perceives to her food-supply, to be petted while she eats a meal?

If i'm trying to eat brekkie / lunch / dinner, & my sweetheart keeps getting between me & my meal, no matter how much i adore him, i'll get irritated - & probly sooner, rather than later. There's a time & place for everything, & nibbling my earlobe, kissing my neck, & taking my hair down every 5-mins won't be the thrill it =would= be, if he chose a more-apropos time & place than the dining table, when i'm most-likely both hungry & pressed for time.

How would petting her during a meal "make her feel her food is safe"? - pestering her is more-likely to make her gobble in a desperate effort to get her meal down B4 U steal it, which increases her risk of bloat & also the amount of air she swallows - swallowed air creates discomfort & digestive problems, all by itself, & bloat / GDV is potentially lethal.
If she's too worried to gobble, she'll freeze, hunker down over her bowl, stiffen, & growl - & then what do U do? U just provoked that reaction - the dog is innocent; by bugging her while she's eating, U caused precisely the behavior that U don't want.

U want the dog to "respect the boundaries" of the other dogs - but U are not respecting hers. She has boundaries, too - & a right to them.


Personally, I've been known to prick the back of a waitron's hand with my fork, when s/he insists upon swooping down to whisk away a dish i've not yet finished. And i'll have U know, i am totally unrepentant; i've done it in casual settings, & in 4-star linen tablecloth dining rooms, where the waitstaff dress better than the diners, & the chef is 2 steps below God.
I'm discrete, i don't make a loud fuss - but i make it crystal-clear to the offender that if s/he expects a tip, my food stays on the table till i've either eaten all i want, or i decide to pack the leftovers.
I worked in restaurants from 15-YO into my mid-20s; back of the house, front, catering, garde manger, bulk prep, garniture, even banquet serving, & no stuffy server in a penguin-suit is going to take my meal, or any portion of it, B4 i've finished.

- terry

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Old 10-28-2017, 05:44 PM
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Lightbulb book, "Mine!"



@LaurenS77 -
there's a very good, very-short topical booklet on resource guarding / 'possessive' behavior -

https://www.amazon.com/Mine-Practica.../dp/0970562942

Jean Donaldson is a whiz, a very well-respected trainer, & a good writer - she explains things clearly, & has a sense of humor, too.
- terry

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Old 10-28-2017, 06:07 PM
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@Markie -
please explain how it "helps" a young dog, who is already worried about threats she perceives to her food-supply, to be petted while she eats a meal?

If i'm trying to eat brekkie / lunch / dinner, & my sweetheart keeps getting between me & my meal, no matter how much i adore him, i'll get irritated - & probly sooner, rather than later. There's a time & place for everything, & nibbling my earlobe, kissing my neck, & taking my hair down every 5-mins won't be the thrill it =would= be, if he chose a more-apropos time & place than the dining table, when i'm most-likely both hungry & pressed for time.

How would petting her during a meal "make her feel her food is safe"? - pestering her is more-likely to make her gobble in a desperate effort to get her meal down B4 U steal it, which increases her risk of bloat & also the amount of air she swallows - swallowed air creates discomfort & digestive problems, all by itself, & bloat / GDV is potentially lethal.
If she's too worried to gobble, she'll freeze, hunker down over her bowl, stiffen, & growl - & then what do U do? U just provoked that reaction - the dog is innocent; by bugging her while she's eating, U caused precisely the behavior that U don't want.

U want the dog to "respect the boundaries" of the other dogs - but U are not respecting hers. She has boundaries, too - & a right to them.


Personally, I've been known to prick the back of a waitron's hand with my fork, when s/he insists upon swooping down to whisk away a dish i've not yet finished. And i'll have U know, i am totally unrepentant; i've done it in casual settings, & in 4-star linen tablecloth dining rooms, where the waitstaff dress better than the diners, & the chef is 2 steps below God.
I'm discrete, i don't make a loud fuss - but i make it crystal-clear to the offender that if s/he expects a tip, my food stays on the table till i've either eaten all i want, or i decide to pack the leftovers.
I worked in restaurants from 15-YO into my mid-20s; back of the house, front, catering, garde manger, bulk prep, garniture, even banquet serving, & no stuffy server in a penguin-suit is going to take my meal, or any portion of it, B4 i've finished.

- terry

It's more of calming they responded very well to it. In fact I can tell you an example. Sly my now 8 month old Siberian Husky I got her when she was almost 5 months old. She could not be around any dog whenever she ate as she would attack them for being there and take there food. I started staying with her petting her all while she ate now I would go all they way down to the food bowl she growled at me couple of times then stopped. I started slowly bringing Suki and the others to eat with her. I would keep them about a foot away and stay with them. I could walk over to her while she was eating pet her put my hands in her food bowl give her a belly rub while she was eating with no issues. Now she eats just fine with all my other huskies simply because I found away to calm her down and show her she was safe when she was eating. As you can tell from the pictures there is no more guarding she minds her space doesn't bother Siku in the least and they can drink out of the same water bowl with no guarding :-):-):-)

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Old 10-28-2017, 06:23 PM
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Sly is the Black and White one with the nice rlse collar :-):-) She is responding as she should with other dogs while eating no problems :-):-)

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Old 10-28-2017, 06:25 PM
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U want the dog to "respect the boundaries" of the other dogs - but U are not respecting hers. She has boundaries, too - & a right to them.




- terry


The dog gets to make the call on boundaries? Respect the dog's boundaries? Seriously? No wonder there are so many confused messed up dogs. I've done exactly the same from day one with all the dogs I have had over my lifetime and never once had a resource guarder. I can appreciate that dog on dog boundaries exist but there is only one "sheriff" and that would be the human. Through evenhanded and wise leadership there should never be a competition between dog and owner for resources. All my pups learned in short order that I am not a competitor for their food rather I was the provider of their food.

I sure hope you are kidding about the times you have pricked a server's hand with your fork, that's just completely strange. I hope you never went back to the same restaurant and had the same server, who knows what they might have "added" to your food.
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