Thoughts on saying ‘no’ to dog

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior

Thoughts on saying ‘no’ to dog

This is a discussion on Thoughts on saying ‘no’ to dog within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; We have a 6 month old cavoodle we’ve just rehomed who has never had any training. We’ve just begun training with him and he’s catching ...

User Tag List

Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By AthenaLove
  • 1 Post By Sthelena

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-14-2019, 07:46 PM
  #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
We have a 6 month old cavoodle we’ve just rehomed who has never had any training. We’ve just begun training with him and he’s catching on quickly, but there’s so much to work on. He’s very nippy and gently bites most people who try to pat him. He humps all guests who are children. So far in 3 weeks he’s learnt sit, drop, stay, come, but we’re struggling stopping the behaviours that aren’t appropriate. So many trainers whose tips I’ve read say not to say ‘no’ to a dog, but that’s the only thing that stops him in the moment. Also removing him from the situation. What are your thoughts on saying ‘no’ to a dog?
Lotus29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2019, 04:07 PM
  #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Teaching our dogs what we prefer is much better than constantly saying "NO!!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lotus29 View Post
What are your thoughts on saying ‘no’ to a dog?

Here are some of my personal thoughts on this topic of saying no... and better ways to train our dogs.


1)I find it is best to teach a dog an alternative behavior to stop the unwanted behavior! And then immediately reward the heck out of the correct behavior with yummy food and praise.

So if your dog is humping a child, for example, you could say no (in a polite way) BUT then immediately ask your dog for a sit or shake, or high five or down or whatever he can do easily! Same for jumping up. If dog jumps up at person, simply turn your body around for a quick second and then turn back towards dog and ask for a sit (or whatever)
When dog complies, then immediately say "YES!!" and pay!!! (reward)

2) I like to teach my dogs that their own good choices get them what they want.

If dog is pulling on leash? Stop walking! Yes, STOP walking. Say nothing. Wait for your dog to turn around and look at you, or for your dog to loosen his body or take a step back. Then proceed.

Dog trying to get to food too excitedly or rudely or pushy? Simply teach your dog a polite sit. When dog complies and sits, then say YES! and give him some food. My dogs all are trained to sit very politely in certain places before all meals. Very good manners. Plus much safer when you are dealing with multiple pets with different personalities!

3)We tend to tell our dogs "no" all the time, but we forget to tell them what we would prefer them to do! Try teaching your dog what you like and then reward that behavior.

It feels crappy to be saying "No!" all the time to our dogs, and it really doesn't teach them what we like, right?

4)I also train my dogs and others that all good behavior will be generously rewarded. With genuine praise and ample great treats. You can often hear me saying "Thank you" to my dogs as they demonstrate great behavior. People actually stop me often to tell me they love how I talk to my dogs!

When you start rewarding all good behavior, I find that the not so hot behaviors start to go away on their own. The dog soon learns that doing what I like is very rewarding to them in many ways, so then they start offering the beautiful manners on their own.

For example, my Puma pup has been rewarded so often for laying quietly at my feet when we are outside my shop, or at work or, at a store etc... that she very frequently will lay down on her own now when I stop to talk to someone. I don't have to even tell her to lay down. Very nice!!!!

We went to the bank the other day and I stopped to talk to the banker who saw Puma's nice manners and wanted some training tips for her parent's out of control dog. We talked for a very long time. Puma layed peacefully at my feet the whole time. I never asked her to lay down, she just has been rewarded so often for it that it has become second nature to her. I did thank Puma several times during our chat and gave her some nice lil treats for being so completely awesome and chill as I helped the banker and her family dog.

So, in summary, I prefer to teach our dogs what to do, sub out an alternative positive behavior for the negative actions, and reward, reward, reward all beautiful and good behavior!!

Sometimes you gotta say "No!" to your dog, but focus on the "Yes!" and you will get much better results. And you will enjoy dog training much more.
Littlefox and allornothing like this.

Last edited by AthenaLove; 04-16-2019 at 04:15 PM.
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2019, 04:22 PM
  #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Teaching our dogs what we prefer is much better than constantly saying "NO!!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lotus29 View Post
What are your thoughts on saying ‘no’ to a dog?

Here are some of my personal thoughts on this topic of saying no... and better ways to train our dogs.


1)I find it is best to teach a dog an alternative behavior to stop the unwanted behavior! And then immediately reward the heck out of the correct beahvior with yummy food and praise.

So if your dog is humping a child, for example, you could say no (in a polite way)but then immediately ask your dog for a sit or shake, or high five or down or whatever he can do easily! Same for jumping up. If dog jumps up at person, simply turn your body around for a quick second and then turn back towards dog and ask for a sit (or whatever) Then immediately pay!!! (reward)

2) I like to teach my dogs that their own good choices get then what they want.

If dog is pulling on leash? Stop walking! Yes, STOP walking. Say nothing. Wait for your dog to turn around and look at you, or for your dog to loosen his body or take a step back. Then proceed.

3)We tend to tell our dogs "no" all the time, but we forget to tell them what we would prefer them to do! Try teaching your dog what you like and then reward that behavior.

It feels crappy to be saying "No!" all the time to our dogs, and it really doesn't teach them what we like, right?

4)I also train my dogs and others that all good behavior will be generously rewarded. With genuine praise and ample great treats. You can often hear me saying "Thank you" to my dogs as they demonstrate great behavior. People actually stop me often to tell me they love how I talk to my dogs!

When you start rewarding all good behavior, I find that the not so hot behaviors start to go away on their own. The dog soon learns that doing what I like is very rewarding to them in many ways, so then they start offering the beautiful manners on their own.

For example, my Puma pup has been rewarded so often for laying quietly at my feet when we are outside my shop, or at work or, at a store etc... that she very frequently will lay down on her own now when I stop to talk to someone. I don't have to even tell her to lay down. Very nice!!!!

We went to the bank the other day and I stopped to talk to the banker who saw Puma's nice manners and wanted some training tips for her parent's out of control dog. We talked for a very long time. Puma layed peacefully at my feet the whole time. I never asked her to lay down, she just has been rewarded so often for it that it has become second nature to her. I did thank Puma several times during our chat and gave her some nice lil treats for being so completely awesome and chill as I helped the banker and her family dog.

So, in summary, I prefer to teach our dogs what to do, sub out an alternative positive behavior for the negative actions, and reward, reward, reward all beautiful and good behavior!!

Sometimes you gotta say "No!" to your dog, but focus on the "Yes!" and you will get much better results. And you will enjoy dog training much more.
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 04-17-2019, 08:59 PM
  #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Hmmmm I see that my prior post came up twice here. I wonder why? That is odd.

Anyway sorry, didn't mean to post it twice.
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2019, 06:57 AM
  #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 549
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Lol as usual I agree with athenalove. That was a good post and sums things up pretty well. Teaching the dog what you want instead of just saying NO all the time is huge.
AthenaLove likes this.
Sthelena is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply




Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Puppy 17 weeks old, thoughts on age? tgfamily General Dog Discussion 5 02-15-2019 05:23 AM
Thoughts on Breed Mix asparks467 Dog Breeds 4 03-28-2018 10:20 AM
Any thoughts on what breed our puppy might be? Nor10 Dog Pictures and Videos 7 07-08-2016 06:07 PM
Pyrenees Mix Pup - Thoughts on what other breeds she looks like? sumtuck Dog Breeds 5 03-16-2016 02:51 PM
Reactivity thoughts after a long Thanksgiving weekend? PoppyKenna Dog Training and Behavior 10 12-02-2015 03:17 PM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.