Puppy gets aggressive

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Puppy gets aggressive

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Old 01-11-2019, 03:14 AM
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Puppy gets aggressive

Our 9 weeks old puppy gets quite aggressive, growling and biting when you try to pull him away from the food that is not his. For example, I accidently dropped some cat food on the floor and he started eating it. When I tried to pull him away from the food he immediately started growling and biting.

Can anything be done about it? Is this normal behavior for puppies or not?
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:09 AM
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No, it's not normal behavior for a puppy... however it does happen if a puppy had to 'fight' other dogs for food.


I would contact a behaviorist asap.
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Old 01-11-2019, 12:43 PM
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We found him in the elevator where someone abandoned him when he was 5 weeks old. He was only 650gr back then and 15cm in length, not sure if he could fight anyone for anything when he was so small.
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Old 01-11-2019, 03:56 PM
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Research "resource guarding" and techniques about preventing. Very common.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:23 AM
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Please go see a behaviorist. It is easier to get rid of aggression issues in dogs when they are young. You don’t want this to escalate into other forms of aggression.
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Old 01-17-2019, 08:47 PM
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Sounds like resource guarding (RG) to me. Very common issue. Basically, your dog is very worried about certain things being taken from him. Usually dogs can have issues with RG and food,treats, bones or toys. Sometimes it can be about space, furniture, people, etc.

You can help your dog with his RG issue if you research it and make sure to use positive reinforcement techniques to change your dog's perception of valuable things being taken from him. Using punishment will generally make it worse and can be dangerous to humans and other pets.

You must use a lot of patience and understanding and honestly it can take some time to change your dog's mindset and not need to RG, but it can be done!!

If you don't feel up to it, hire a qualified behaviorist that uses positive reinforcement training.

Last edited by AthenaLove; 01-17-2019 at 08:50 PM.
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Old 01-17-2019, 08:50 PM
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Great online article about Resource Guarding!!!

Here is a great online article that will really help you to understand your dog's resource guarding and how to help him.

RESOURCE GUARDING – HOW TO TEACH YOUR DOG TO SHARE by GRISHA STEWART
Resource Guarding €“ How to Teach Your Dog to Share | Grisha Stewart


A bit from her article:

Here are a few of the myths about resource guarding, according to Jean Donaldson's book "Mine! A Guide to Resource Guarding in Dogs."

Myth #1: Resource guarding is abnormal behavior.
Myth #2: Because resource guarding is driven largely by genetics, it can’t be changed.
Myth #3: Resource guarding can be cured by making a dog realize that resources are abundant.
Myth #4: Resource guarding is a symptom of “dominance” or “pushiness.”
Myth #5: Resource guarding is the result of “spoiling” a dog.


So if the answer is not to "dominate" your dog or shower it with freely available food, then what is it? Simple. Make your puppy or dog understand that the approach of a human to his food, toys, space, etc. is a Good Thing.

The process is called classical conditioning. Just as the clicker is associated with treats in your dog's mind, the approach of a human hand, face, or other body part to his food dish should mean better food is on it's way.
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Old 01-17-2019, 09:03 PM
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Sounds like resource guarding (RG) to me. Very common issue. Basically, your dog is very worried about certain things being taken from him. Usually dogs can have issues with RG and food,treats, bones or toys. Sometimes it can be about space, furniture, people, etc.

You can help your dog with his RG issue if you research it and make sure to use positive reinforcement techniques to change your dog's perception of valuable things being taken from him. Using punishment will generally make it worse and can be dangerous to humans AND other pets.

You must use a lot of patience and understanding--- and honestly it can take some time to change your dog's mindset to not need to RG, but it can be done!!

Basically, for it to work, you want to be in the mindset that your dog is honestly fearful or worried about things being taken away. He is not being dominant or otherwise. You need to teach him that your presence near his "treasures" mean that you are there to bring him things not take them away.

Teach him to "trade" with you for better stuff. So if he has found cat kibble, or a chicken bone on the ground, perhaps, say the word "trade", or "drop it" or "leave it" and then give him amazingly delicious bites of steak or hamburger or chicken, etc. Repeat over and over again til he starts looking up at you like, "Hey, hi, what are you bringing me now?" rather than him seeing you or someone else and growling and snarling at you guys.

If you don't feel up to it, hire a qualified behaviorist that uses positive reinforcement training. Please don't hire anyone who wants to use any form of punishment or shock collar on resource guarding issues.

Last edited by AthenaLove; 01-17-2019 at 09:10 PM.
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