Overindulged dog

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Overindulged dog

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Old 08-27-2018, 11:03 AM
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Overindulged dog

Hello

We had a trainer come out to help with our dog who seems to be getting aggressive. He growls when you get near him if he has something he values.

I like the trainer. I am just not sure how to implement what he told us,

The trainer said our house is like a mansion to him. He has access to all rooms, furniture, food, toys, yard, affection. And, he is anxious. Those combined are leading to his problem behaviors.

He said not to let him sleep in our bed or go under the bed (he growls when you disturb him under there).

I have taken some of his toys away and we play with them when I decide.

I have stopped free feeding and am feeding twice/day

But, I don't know how to get him off the bed. I have a leash and I could take him off, I guess.

He has not been going under the bed lately.

I am trying to make him walk with me on walks, by holding the leash short. Otherwise, he likes to lead.

I asked the trainer if he could write down suggestions. He told us about his psychology, but I am not clear what to do. I have not heard back, yet.

He brought some dogs to teach my dog to socialize. My dog did not like it, but he was able to be calm with the other dogs.

We see a little cockapoo on our walks who is friendly and wants to play. She bows and tries to get him to play. He just looks confused but he does not bark.

He is laying on the floor beside my chair right now. He likes to be where I am (or someone else if I am not here)
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Old 08-27-2018, 03:57 PM
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Your dog is gorgeous!

Restricting resources from a dog anxious about the loss of resources seems crazy to me.

Absolutely you should be taking measures to make your house safe for you and your family but I've never understood the whole "dogs think they are the boss if they sleep on the bed".

Anyway, to answer your question: this is a forum dedicated to a different style of training and unfortunately I don't think you'll find answers that work with your trainer's philosophy. There's no one way to do it, if this trainer suits you then you should wait for their instructions.
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Old 08-27-2018, 05:57 PM
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Sounds like he wants you to practice NILF (Nothing In Life is Free), but that will NOT help with resource guarding. So what if he earned the item, he still has it, he still views it as his, and he is still going to be worried about losing the item.

You need to teach her is that your being by her treasured stuff causes good things to happen and you are not out to steal the valued possession. You can accomplish that by playing trading games, where she trades you the item for a higher valued treat then gets the item back. Also try dropping tasty treats when you walk by her bed or hiding spot if she's guarding those.

Personally I do advise keeping a dog off the bed or couch if they guard it just because it's easiest, and in the case of the bed sometimes a safety issue. To get him off the furniture try training the off cue, and use the leash to guide him if needed.


A great book on the subject is Mine! by Jean Donaldson https://www.amazon.com/Mine-Practica.../dp/0970562942
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:48 PM
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Thanks. Chas your dog looks amazing

Maybe, I am describing it wrong. He, the trainer, is really mellow.

He did not think my dog is going to hurt anyone, but he might hurt himself by running into the street if he gets scared or upsetting the wrong dog.

I worry, with the growling, that it will turn to biting. He already has a big "aggressive" sticker on his file at the vet.

I can trade with him. He will let me.

I don't think he guards the bed. He tries to protect me and keep others away from me. But, when he goes under the bed, he does not want anyone to bother him.

Really, I just want him to be able to be around other dogs and people without having to worry he will be aggressive.

We usually cross the street when he sees dogs, but the little cockapoo is gentle and he does not get upset.

I am sorry if I said anything against policy.

The dog is crashed out by me again.

He used to lunge and bark at other dogs and I worked on calming him before we got near them and keeping him a distance from other dogs and he has stopped barking. He stares at dogs or people but does not react anymore.

He won't come when I call him. He knows his name. I reward him when he comes inside when I call. But, if he is sitting down and I call him he looks away.
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Old 08-27-2018, 11:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorib64 View Post
Thanks. Chas your dog looks amazing

Maybe, I am describing it wrong. He, the trainer, is really mellow.

He did not think my dog is going to hurt anyone, but he might hurt himself by running into the street if he gets scared or upsetting the wrong dog.

I worry, with the growling, that it will turn to biting. He already has a big "aggressive" sticker on his file at the vet.

I can trade with him. He will let me.

I don't think he guards the bed. He tries to protect me and keep others away from me. But, when he goes under the bed, he does not want anyone to bother him.

Really, I just want him to be able to be around other dogs and people without having to worry he will be aggressive.

We usually cross the street when he sees dogs, but the little cockapoo is gentle and he does not get upset.

I am sorry if I said anything against policy.

The dog is crashed out by me again.

He used to lunge and bark at other dogs and I worked on calming him before we got near them and keeping him a distance from other dogs and he has stopped barking. He stares at dogs or people but does not react anymore.

He won't come when I call him. He knows his name. I reward him when he comes inside when I call. But, if he is sitting down and I call him he looks away.
Ahh O.K. you are worried about his being fear aggressive towards other dogs, and need help on recall if I'm not misunderstanding.

He may never be a social butterfly and he may never want to run and greet other dogs, some dogs are simply like that just like some people, while they enjoy being around their friends do not want to go out and meet strangers. What you need to work on is having him be able to see other dogs without wanting to scare them off.

One question I do have is when he is staring at other dogs or people is he calmly watching them or is he tensed up and using calming signals? What you want is his calmly watching him.

My boy Zody is fear aggressive towards people, but is much better then he used to be, and we can usually now get through whole walks without him losing his cool. He's now made friends with a lot of the people he sees the most often and will go greet them, with those he does not know he'll usually look to me for his treat when he spots someone so long as I maintain some distance between him and them. That's what you need to work towards with your boy.

To work with him you need to take very high value, irresistible, treats with you on the walk, those treats he should only get when you take him on a walk and he spots a dog. When you take him on walks you should let him spot a dog and as soon as he sees it start giving him treats, keep those treats coming till the dog is out of sight then stop giving him the treats. If he starts to react then you've gotten too close and you should just get him out of there. The object is to have him make the connection that seeing dogs gets him treats, and when he does you'll notice that he will spot a dog then look to you for the treat. As he gets better you'll be able to get closer and closer to other dogs without him reacting. He does not need to do anything but see the dog to get the treat, you should not be having him do any other cues since he could decide it's obeying the cue and not spotting the dog, that gets him the treat.

This site Care for Reactive Dogs explains, in detail, what I just described and also has videos and other resources that will help you work with your boy.

For recall you'll need a good treat, I recommend one that's different then the one you'll be using on walks, and to start working with him in a boring room of your house. It will also probably help if you use clicker or marker word training. Once he's reliably coming to you in the boring room, move on to a different part of the house that has more distractions and start again, then move to the backyard, then on to the front yard, then out on a slightly more busy street. Each time you need to start from scratch and work with him till he's reliable before moving on to the next location. It will help to keep upping the value of the treats as the distractions increase and when you are practicing on the street call him to you, give him the treat, then release him to go back to what he was doing. You never want him to learn the coming to you means the end of all things interesting and fun.
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Old 08-27-2018, 11:49 PM
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He looks attentively at what is going on around us/ is easily distracted. I would call it more anxious.

Yes, i am worried about recall. I am really wary about him running in the street. I would still be worried if he would come indoors and backyard.

Thank you for all of your help. We love our dog and just want to do the best we can
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Last edited by Lorib64; 08-27-2018 at 11:52 PM.
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Old 08-29-2018, 06:06 AM
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I am proud of him

Yesterday he went to the vet without issue. He just looked at the other dogs, but did not appear nervous.

On our walk a smaller, friendly dog ran over to him. He looked confused, but did not react.

I have tried what you suggested for fear/aggression before, he used to lunge and bark. Now, he just keeps walking. But, we do not approach other dogs.
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