is this normal behavior?

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is this normal behavior?

This is a discussion on is this normal behavior? within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hi all ❤️ (vid linked below) I recently got a french bulldog puppy (female, has not been spayed yet) & I had questions regarding the ...

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Old 09-29-2018, 10:36 PM
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is this normal behavior?

Hi all ❤️ (vid linked below)
I recently got a french bulldog puppy (female, has not been spayed yet) & I had questions regarding the way her & my 4 year old pug tzu (male, has been neutered) have been “playing” is this playing? my parents do believe it because they run around & sometimes my pug grabs toys and they play tug of war or is it something i should be worried about? if someone could explain what they are doing I would greatly appreciate it! thank you!! 😊❤️

p.s.
i do believe he is trying to hump her at one point & even vice versa but i’m really not sure what to make of that 😰 so if anyone can tell me what exactly is going on here, i would love u forever lol 😝

p.p.s. i’m not sure if you can see everything that is happening clearly but he mouths down on her neck sometimes closing his mouth, pushes her with his nose at times, uses his paw to push her, shows very little of teeth, has a straight tail, she puts her bum in his face, growls, & tries to jump on his back

https://youtu.be/Su0XpfgKg-0
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Old 09-30-2018, 10:10 AM
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Looks like normal playing to me. How old is the puppy? Just because your other dog is neutered does not mean he will not try and hump her in fact when she comes in season, he can even breed her just won't produce pups.


Just call him off if he becomes persistent but in that tape it just seems to be a passing thought.
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Old 10-02-2018, 07:13 AM
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I agree all perfectly normal play.

Humping can be a dominance issue, the older dog just telling her he is boss.

I will add that the older dog needs to loose quite a bit of weight, he is obese and puffing and panting with exertion after little play.

You love him obviously so be a great owner and diet him.
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Old 10-08-2018, 03:32 AM
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I wouldn't mind how they play as long as they are happy of what they're doing. It's actually clear that the way they play is very normal. Don't panic.
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:47 PM
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Why dogs hump...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
Humping can be a dominance issue, the older dog just telling her he is boss.
Great article about humping....not attributed to dominance
Ok guys, I want to share this interesting article again about dog humping/mounting.

Marc Bekoff Ph.D.
Animal Emotions

Why Dogs Hump

"There isn't a single reason behind this normal behavior"

"Mounting and humping should not be considered abnormal behavior patterns.
While mounting is best known for its role in reproduction, it also occurs in many other contexts and emotional states.

Dogs mount when they're excited and aroused and even when they're stressed and anxious.

Mounting could also be what ethologists call a displacement behavior, meaning that it's a byproduct of conflicted emotions. For some dogs a new visitor to the house could elicit a mixture of excitement and stress that could make for a humping dog.


Mounting is also very common during play, sometimes as an attention-getter, an affiliative behavior, or when a dog is over-excited. I've seen dogs going "beserk", enjoying that "doggy fit" - running here and there and mounting and humping a friend...

What about dominance and mounting? In a recent article on mounting, Peter Borchelt, Ph. D., a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB) in New York City, noted, “Mounting could be part of a suite of behaviors associated with aggression, such as high posture, resource guarding, direct stares, and threats and standing over. But mounting, in and of itself, doesn’t indicate a status issue. By itself, mounting might not mean a lot.” (cited in Hecht, 2012).

If mounting suggests a dog is under-stimulated perhaps they could be provided with additional mental or physical activities. If mounting suggests anxiety it would be good to increase a dog’s comfort level in a particular situation, Or, if a dog gets overstimulated and goes bonkers or gets rude or impolite during social interactions with other dogs or people, it would be good to encourage mutually-beneficial interactions. Guardians (aka owners) can intervene in mounting and humping by getting the dog's attention-getting or by teaching an alternate behavior to assist the dog in their interactions with others."

Link to this article:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b.../why-dogs-hump
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:23 PM
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Your dogs are so cute playing together!!! Loved the video, thanks for posting

To me, it looks like they are both enjoying the playtime. It does not look too rough at all. Very fun...and great exercise for both doggies.

I would not all all worry about the humping. Looks like it is just one of your doggies many "moves" or play styles. My older shy dog Gracie has just started (finally!) playing with our newer Puma puppy. Sometimes Gracie will hump Puma (both girls!)
but Puma usually just moves her body away, as if to discourage it. If Gracie does it a lot in one play session I just gently call her off/redirect ---and then release them to go play again a moment later. No big deal. Your dogs look fine to me in regards to the quick humping moment. I think it has nothing at all to do with dominance, just a play movement.

I don't know about you, but I absolutely love to watch my dogs play. Maybe because my shy Gracie dog is finally brave enough to play with another dog, dunno. I just know that watching them play brings me such joy!

Enjoy their fun playtime! You are lucky your doggies like to play together so nicely
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