Need help with newly adopted dogs behavior

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior

Need help with newly adopted dogs behavior

This is a discussion on Need help with newly adopted dogs behavior within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; I adopted a pitbull terrier mix 10 days ago, she's a year and 4 months old. They said she had been at the humane society ...

User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-17-2018, 04:22 PM
  #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Need help with newly adopted dogs behavior

I adopted a pitbull terrier mix 10 days ago, she's a year and 4 months old. They said she had been at the humane society for almost a year.
A few times when we had her in her kennel to feed her or for bedtime if my 18 month old gets too close to the cage she lunges at the cage and growls or barks, she acts ok with food outside of her cage. She has jumped the baby gate several times to try to play with the room mates cat, but he's not into that and feels threatened by her. We also have ducks, goats, and a pig. She has been around the pig but started to try to play rough with him so I stopped letting him around her. She acts like she wants to chase the ducks. Then last night she slipped her collar when my boyfriend was walking her, she ran straight to the goats bit one when it fell to the ground she went to the next then finally got into a corner so we were able to catch her.
How exactly could I correct these problems? I really don't want to have to take her back, I would feel like I failed her if I did that.
Attached Images
 
Maggiem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2018, 07:13 PM
  #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Wow! That sounds like a lot of stimulation for any new dog to handle, much less a dog that has lived basically her entire life in a shelter. Thank you for wanting to help her.

She is probably going to need a lot of time and patience and training to help her navigate this new life with your full house. And lots of compassionate understanding from you guys that this is all new to her and she does not yet know your household dynamics. (No, not alpha/dominance or anything, just it is all so new to her --and probably entirely confusing as to what is ok and what is not)

Like your 18 month old just beginning to learn about the world, this new pup is starting all over and having to learn all new stuff. Not an easy transition for any dog, right?

With an 18 month old baby in your home, I urge you to be very vigilant and use management tools and prevention techniques to the fullest.

Toddlers and small kids are totally unpredictable and can cause even the best "behaved" dog to lose it and make a bad decision (bite) from being over stressed.

If you can understand that most dog "aggression" stems from fear or anxiety or stress, you will be able to help your dog to acclimate to your family.

So when your dog growls/lunges at your child, you have to remind yourself that for some reason your new dog is worried/nervous/anxious/stressed about the child coming that close to her "safe space" (kennel) esp when food is around. Maybe in the shelter she was caged/kenneled and feeding time was especially stressful. Who knows?

Personally, I would not have your child around this new dog and food until you are sure that your dog is 99.9% comfortable with your kiddo being there when she eats.

Your dog is RG (resource guarding) her food/crate for some reason and your child poses a threat to your new dog in your dog's mind. You can train the RG but it takes time and patience. It is not fun when the dog is using aggression to solve problems. Don't give your dog the opportunity to practice her RG unless you are using it as a training moment with amazing food bites and kindness.

Use baby gates as prevention tools to keep your child away from dog's crate when you are feeding her. Also use them to give your dog some quiet time as needed from all the other stimulation.

If your dog growls please do not yell or punish her.
She is letting you know she is worried/stressed about something and you guys need to work on making her feel better about it through humane gentle training. Punishing the growl or bark can suppress the reaction of the stressful feeling, but it does not help to make your dog feel more comfortable about it.

The goal is to change your dog's underlying feelings of stress or worry so she will not need to react or use aggression to solve her problems.

Thank you again for helping this dog. Shelter life is no fun for any dog. It is amazing that a dog can even function after living most of her life in a shelter, even if it a wonderful shelter. Geez. Life is so different in a real home, so much to learn for a new dog. So hard on a dog. Patience is key.
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2018, 07:37 PM
  #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Try a martingale collar for a dog that slips their collar

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maggiem View Post
Then last night she slipped her collar when my boyfriend was walking her, she ran straight to the goats bit one when it fell to the ground she went to the next then finally got into a corner so we were able to catch her.
How exactly could I correct these problems?
If your dog is slipping her collar, I would highly suggest you try using a soft fabric martingale collar that is properly adjusted. My Gracie dog used to slip her collars and her harnesses and it was very scary to me. She would easily and often get spooked by something unexpectedly and back out of her collars/harnesses.

Then I tried a martingale collar and it helped immensely!!

Gracie only got out of it once, but that was my fault. I got a bit lax since she hardly ever spooks anymore, and over time the collar had gotten too loose on her neck ...and she spooked suddenly at a lady holding a hose, watering her yard.... and backed out of it. But-- that was one time in about 3 years, and all my fault.

And if you do get a fabric martingale, only use it for walking or training with a leash in your presence-- and take it off otherwise since it can get caught and tighten up accidentally on your dog.

Hope this helps. It helped me. Gave me a lot of piece of mind that my dog wasn't going to slip her collar and get hurt, run over, or hurt an animal if she got spooked or fearful.
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 09-17-2018, 07:51 PM
  #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Stacking two baby gates works well to separate pets

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maggiem View Post
She has jumped the baby gate several times to try to play with the room mates cat, but he's not into that and feels threatened by her. .
In the beginning when we first adopted our fearful/ anxious/ cautious Gracie dog from the shelter we were worried about her and our cats and little chihuahua, so we used two baby gates and stacked them at times.

This prevented the cat from jumping in the room where Gracie was, and kept Gracie from jumping the baby gate. No need to anymore, but it helped us to keep all safe as we implemented our counterconditioning training to help Gracie and our cats to feel safe around each other.

Now Gracie feeds her cats!! Too cool as she "calls" all our animals to meals. So much better than before when she would growl, lunge, bark and chase our cat nonstop out of anxiety. The cat (Tortie) made her super nervous since Tortie loooooves to stare at shy fearful Gracie. Cat staring=Gracie chasing cat away. Arggh. Scary.

Maybe try stacking two baby gates for now til your new pup acclimates to her new family and learns not to chase the other animals?
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2018, 08:09 PM
  #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 851
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Train your new dog with fun Impulse Control Games!!

Since your household has SO many stimulation triggers (cats, ducks, pig, baby,etc) for your new dog, I would suggest you look up impulse control games online and practice those with your new dog. This can really help teach her brain to think before just reacting (ie chasing another animal)

I make FUN and rewarding games like "Focus" and "Leave it" and "Drop it" and "Where's the kitty?" or "Where's the squirrel?" for my dogs to learn impulse control. So instead of chasing the squirrels on a walk, my dogs will now look at me for a reward or praise for not chasing them.

Also, maybe make a flirt pole for your dog so she can "legally" chase something that is not one of your other animals! You can make one cheaply by looking it up online. If you read how to use it properly, the flirt pole can really help teach impulse control. Plus it is great exercise for your dog!! My new pup loves it.

Remember.... a mentally and physically tired dog is less likely to get into trouble
AthenaLove is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newly adopted dog issues equineace Dog Training and Behavior 1 05-10-2018 10:53 AM
Fellow Daycare Workers? Curious and looking for other experiences/insights. kelly528 Dog Training and Behavior 6 11-17-2016 08:51 PM
Pitbulls et al... jagger Dog Training and Behavior 29 08-25-2016 10:52 AM
Best site for finding a dog? John Howard General Dog Discussion 86 02-01-2016 03:53 PM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.