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My new dog hates men!

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Old 08-16-2017, 12:46 AM
  #11
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No i actually try to encourage him to go up to the guy and sniff him and praise/pet him for being good but then he barks at them and I correct him by snapping my finger and telling him no or getting in between them. He's also never on leash when meeting them so he can easily move away
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:44 AM
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Unhappy this is way-too random, uncontrolled, & even punitive

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Originally Posted by DieselK View Post


No -- i actually try to encourage him to go up to the guy & sniff him and praise/ pet him for being good but then he barks at them and I correct him by snapping my finger and telling him no or getting in between them.

He's also never on leash when meeting them -- so he can easily move away.
U can't do all those random things, with the dog OFF leash, & expect his thoughts / feelings about men to 'improve'.

1st, asking him to get closer to his Nemesis is bad, period.
U need to make happy associations FROM A DISTANCE where he's comfortable, not anxious, & not reacting. He need only be aware that a man is over =====> there, not a worry, simply present.
Then, YOU make the happy associations happen by raining Good Things on the dog - food is a very simple, quick-to-deliver, reliable Good Thing, so that's where we start.

2nd, that he's OFF leash is not helpful; there's no control on his own distance.
Sending him closer to someone who scares him increases his anxiety; when he exceeds his own threshold, he barks - & moves away. // He's been set-up to fail, repeatedly. That's only rehearsing his fears. U don't want him to practice his anxieties - U want him to lose them, to feel comfy & trusting.

3rd, when he inevitably gets anxious, what does his trusted owner do?
Scolds him. Now, the only person he feels he can rely on, is angry with him - & as far as the dog is concerned, this is all HIS fault, he never gets in trouble like this unless MEN are around, they always mess things up! I don't like them, they make her mad at me...


He needs
- happy associations
- GRADUAL step-by-step decreases in distance between, at a pace set by the dog's own progress.
- consistency, & most of all,
- situational control.


U can't have the Scary Man giving treats, either - not at this stage, unless U can set it up so that the dog is loose behind a barrier at a set distance, & the man tosses tidbits one by one, PAST the dog - so that the dog must move away to eat them, then turn in anticipation of the next.
It's best if the man is sitting, that makes him both smaller & stationary; U should sit closer to the dog, so U're between them. U're the buffer; U half-face the man so that he can look at U, not the dog, & U can see the dog from the corner of Ur eye, & can see the dog fully by just slightly turning Ur head.

Personally, i'd save that set-up for much later in the process, at home; for now, "in the same room" is too much, even man-in-the-foyer, dog-in-the-lounge is too much - the man is invading his home; even if he came with meat by the pound, he's entering the only place the dog feels safe, & ruining his sense of security.
He needs a break from his worries, & home is where he should get it reliably. // We can bring men into his safe-space later.

I'd start on the street or in a car-park, as far from the passing men as is needed for the dog to be able to EAT. He's not barking - he can see them, hear talk if they speak [dogs can hear a normal conversation at 50 to 55-dB from over 75-ft away; don't worry that U can't hear them talking, he can], & he's not showing any but the mildest anxiety... His tail is not under his belly, his eyes do not show white edges, his mouth is not clamped shut.
He capable of following any simple cues he's already learned - stick to 'sit', don't ask him to lie down; that's too vulnerable.

Whenever a man hoves into view, feed feed feed - as quickly as he swallows a pea-sized tidbit, PUT THE NEXT in front of his nose. // Man is gone? -- No more tidbits.
Repeat ad infinitum, gradually getting closer, only as he visibly relaxes.

A busy location with a steady flow of patrons is good - the parking-lot of a grocery store is a great place to start, there are plenty of customers, & it lets U underline the fact that ONLY MEN cause goodies to leap out.
A big-box hardware store or a liquor store would IME skew the patrons to a higher M:F ratio, & that would be helpful, later, but not to begin with.

If U have a car, working close to the car with the door ajar is a Good Idea -
if he gets overwhelmed, or a man unexpectedly comes to close, pop him into the vehicle, preferably into a crate, so that his sightline is BELOW the windows; this can be done by simply turning a shipping crate upside-down on the car seat or in the cargo area, so the solid bottom is now the roof, & the windowed upper-half becomes the floor.
Now, he can't see out, & can detox for a bit - close the crate, sit near him, close the door, both take a break.

Move the car, or the pair of U, if without car, slowly closer to the entry -- over days or a week or more; U need to keep him under threshold. HE sets the pace & the distance; read him carefully for the earliest, lowest signals of discomfort.

3 sessions of 5-minutes each with no meltdowns are infinitely-more valuable than 30-minutes with one meltdown; brief, happy, repeated, successful exposures.
If there's a place close to Ur home, go twice a day for SHORT sessions; don't go for marathons, even 10-minutes might be too long.
Successful is crucial; duration is a potential bomb, it can ruin everything U've gained.

- terry

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Old 08-17-2017, 09:37 PM
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So update: tonight we had a random incident where my sister in law had been here all day and randomly she comes out of the bathroom and he gets up from laying down and just goes after her and even bit her, completely unprovoked. He even knew she was in the bathroom because he had waited outside for her to come back out. I'm kind of at a loss on how to handle him.
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:09 PM
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Unhappy Oops.

the Sister-in-Law doesn't live there, correct?
So... why was the dog not behind a baby-gate, tethered in a safe place away from traffic paths, confined to a bedroom with the door latched, or otherwise not roaming the house, loose?
I understand that U believed this was a male-only issue, but i also know U haven't had him long - Just when did he come home? A week, a month?

There is a known trait in many dogs, particularly herding breeds but also others such as LGDs, where they are SENSITIVE TO CHANGE. Get up from sitting, they react. Sneeze, they react. Sit reading & they ignore U - until U straighten up & reach for the cold-drink on the table. Then they react.

That "he knew" she was IN THE BATHROOM doesn't mean he won't react when she exits, & enters the space outside the bathroom; it's environmental change. // He's gonna not only notice, but react.

this can be desensitized - but U can't keep letting him do it. He can't learn to do something else, if U set him up to fail; he'll just keep doing what he's done, until U make it impossible for him to do, & THEN... U can teach him a New Thing To Do.
Such as... bring a soft-toy or a tuggee to the person, for an interactive game.

But FOR NOW, he only knows to do what he has done - U have to break the behavior chain, by making the unwanted behavior impossible.

- terry


Last edited by leashedForLife; 08-17-2017 at 10:15 PM.
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:25 PM
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Lightbulb some helpful resources

here's some info on "sensitivity to environmental change"

BEHAVIOR ADJUSTMENT TRAINING 2.0:
NEW PRACTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR FEAR, ...
https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1617811750
Grisha Stewart, M.A., CPDT-KA - 2016 - ‎Pets
If your dog is sensitive to environmental changes, then for each new location, you should also do at least one session first without the helper. Carefully ...



Development of the “Highly Sensitive Dog” questionnaire to evaluate ...
journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177616
by M Braem - ‎2017 - ‎Related articles
May 16, 2017 -
A 32-item questionnaire to assess the “highly sensitive dog score” (HSD-s) ... thus allow for adaptive responses to changes in the environment [13–15]. .... and environmental factors known to affect behavior, suggesting that a ...



see "Sudden Environmental Change" defined here -
https://www.dogdictionary.net/types/behaviors/


- terry

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Old 08-18-2017, 11:05 AM
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She does live here and was there when we adopted him. Us two have been the only people who have had constant interaction with him since the day he came home.
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Old 08-18-2017, 02:54 PM
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Unhappy Sorry, sorry, sorry...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselK View Post

She does live here and was there when we adopted him. Us two have been the only people who have had constant interaction with him since the day he came home.
oh, dear! I'm very sorry - i thought she was a frequent visitor. My mistake.

In that case, he's become even-more anxious. // How many times in a day does anyone else come to the door, pass a window, etc, while U are at home? Are there frequent deliveries - to U, or to neighbors? // Does he react to the postie's arrival or departure? // Can he hear & react to neighbors' doorbells or knocks, conversations outside, lawn mowers, a blender growling in someone's kitchen, etc?

I'm just trying to discover what environmental stresses there are, as an everyday rhythm.
Does he get upset by trash-trucks, passing motorcycles, diesel engines? - Joggers or bicyclists going past, while in the house or while on leash?

What about sounds *inside* the house? - the refrigerator kicking on, an AC unit switching one when the thermostat hits X'F, the land-line ringing, the microwave dinging, doors opening or closing?...
Do any of those upset him?

Is there anything other than people, that scares, worries, startles him, he gets up & paces, he pants, he flinches & then lies head-up & tense?
Any other symptoms?

- terry
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Old 08-18-2017, 03:03 PM
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He's extremely chill in the house , lays around most of the day. Hell bark when he's out back at like our neighbors dog when they walk past our house and he'll bark at the door if it's open but that's also triggered by my other dog who barks at the door. But she's not aggressive at all. He follows me and my SIL around the house and has to constantly be by someone's side or have view of them.
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Old 08-18-2017, 04:55 PM
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Talking Bingo!

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Originally Posted by DieselK View Post

He's extremely chill in the house; lays around most of the day. He'll bark when he's out back -- at the neighbors' dog when they walk past our house, & he'll bark at the door, if it's open -- but that's also triggered by my other dog, who barks at the door.
But she's not aggressive at all.

He follows me and my SIL around the house, & has to constantly be by someone's side or have view of them.
... he's a typical somewhat-neurotic over-attached / needy / velcro GSD.

that's not to say that such inability to be truly ALONE & remain calm is "normal" for any dog, but sadly, GSDs are more-prone to the this particular form of anxiety than are, for instance, Labs, Goldens, or GSPs / GWPs.

U can work on this - having him in the same room, but unable to move to U is the beginning. A tether is helpful with this -
https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/is...es/5164-1.html

personally, i'd use a tether with 18-inches of free cable between the clamped ends; that lets the dog stand, sit, or lie down, but not pace, jump on passersby, etc.
If U make it up as a portable tether, any door in the entire house becomes a potential station for the dog; he can accompany U to any room with a door, but is prevented from walking over to lie beside U, nudge U for attn, etc.
He can -see- U, but not approach U; establishing some distance is the 1st step in teaching him to be comfortable in his own skin, & be - eventually - capable of being alone, without getting stressed & anxious.

for the portable version:
- 2-ft long piece of 2x4
- made-to-order bike cable, WITH swivels on the spring-clips
- eyebolt, screwed into the 4-inch side of the lumber

Clip one end of the cable to the eyebolt, put the 2x4 behind the door, slide the free end of the cable under the door, clip that end to the dog's buckle collar or to the chest of a Y-harness.
Now, he's not beside U - but he's not alone. // Give him a low-profile mat to lie on, so he has a sense of place & some boundaries. Provide a chewie or a pacifier - stuffed & frozen (or welded) Kong with half of 1 meal in it, a hunk of antler, a cow's hoof, a thick-walled sterilized marrowbone with good-quality canned food frozen in it, a bull pizzle, etc.

REWARD HIM from a distance for quiet, calm behavior -
anything that's 'better' body language is reward-able. Sit vs stand, lie down on his hip vs tense Sphinx pose, soft eyes, mouth open & tongue lolling vs mouth closed / face tight; anything more open, softer, curvier, more settled, is a reward-able change.
Toss a small but super-good treat to him, after marking the change - his mouth opens from closed, MARK, toss. His head lowers from a strained alert pose with his ears tensely forward & brow furrowed, to head down slightly / ears relaxed / forehead smooth... MARK, toss.

Watch this video to see a master of timing -

She even marks & rewards eye-blinks & look-aways; notice how he shifts from alert, tense Sphinx pose to hip-over. Good stuff! - and his reward for being STILL is movement, very counter-intuitive, but perfect for a terrierrrrist.

I hope this gives U some ideas -
I'd also use as many OTC calmatives as i could lay hands on, at least 3 to begin, 1 oral, 1 scent or nasal, 1 tactile. // Whichever route works 1st will help to activate the other 2 calmatives, thus getting more bang per buck.
* DAP pump spay,
* Bach rescue-remedy liquid [not pills!],
* a super-snug stretchy T-shirt: 10% Lycra / 90% cotton, or all-Spandex,
* pump-spray lavender water,
* a 6-inch wide Ace bandage as a T-touch body-wrap,
* Thunder Cap to reduce visual stimuli.

Any of these is extremely safe, has no side-FX, & no interactions with food / drink or Rx meds. There are no worries about dosage; some require habituation & a happy association [Thunder Cap, stretchy-T-shirt / Ace body-wrap, lavender water]; DAP & Rescue-Remedy LIQUID are immediately usable.

the Thunder Cap -
Product Review: Calming Cap

Lavender water -
Bulgarian Lavender Water 250 ml Spray | Alteya Organics

DAP pump-spray -
https://www.softpaws.com/d-a-p-spray-for-dogs/

T-touch body-wrap -
Demonstration by Sarah Hauser ▶ 1:41

DIY Thundershirt: How to Make Your Own Canine Anxiety Wrap
https://www.k9ofmine.com/diy-thundershirt/


- terry
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Old 08-18-2017, 10:33 PM
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Tried rewarding him with positive reinforcement with treats and even had my SIL feed him treats and he took them well and as soon as she walked away he lunged at her
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