My Husky is chewing up walls, furtiture and ... everything

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My Husky is chewing up walls, furtiture and ... everything

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Old 02-21-2019, 05:55 PM
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My Husky is chewing up walls, furtiture and ... everything

When we leave our husky alone fore more than an hour, she starts chexing that things. She destroyed one of my office chairs, their electric water bowl, and occasionally the wall. Not so much the corner of a wall, but the wall.


Facts:
- Yue (pronounced UA), Husky, female, 7 months, spayed. (the dog causing issues)
- Chloe, Jack Russell, female, 6 years, spayed (Very close and good friends)
- Has a house/crate, but I don't like the idea of her being trapped in there for hours.
- Yard too open to leave out alone for extended periods of time
- Left in living-room with curtains and blinds opens. Plenty of nature to watch.
- Walked and played with regularly.
- Ropes and bully sticks left for entertainment. Tried kongs, but she loses interest FAST
- TV left on to animal planet (Tried without TV, makes no noticeable difference.)


Does anyone have ANY preventative suggestions? Is it literally just a Husky thing, being away from Alpha? Seems more out of boredom than retaliation.
I really need help. She's tearing up my house, walls and all.
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:47 PM
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Your dog will be much safer in a crate than chewing up the walls.
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:13 AM
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My Husky is chewing up walls, furtiture and ... everything

Dogs are den animals, crates are natural. Every time you LET her chew things you are TEACHING her to chew things. Use the crate for her good and yours.

When you say she gets walked, you mean 60+ minutes of running, patrolling, etc each day, right? Because she’s a husky and needs to expel a huge amount of energy, not just walk for a few minutes.


What kind of training are you doing with her daily to help her use up her mental energy?


No, destruction is not a husky thing, other than that they have an incredible amount of energy that NEEDS to be spent, both physical and mental. I grew up with huskies and when they get what they need they are not destructive but they NEED to use that energy. Growing up my family had the rule that the dogs got 60 minutes minimum walking or at the dog park (the yard doesn’t count). The ONLY exception to this was when it was below zero degrees Fahrenheit then she only got 30 minutes.


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Old 03-01-2019, 12:27 PM
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Teach her to like her crate, give her fun things to do in her crate, and then use it to prevent her from destroying your house and probably eventually killing herself by ingesting something she shouldn't. Some dogs, when left loose and alone, will think "huh, I guess the fun is over, I should sleep/rest/be quiet now." Some will make their own fun. Huskies, more of often than not, fit into the second category. If she's eating walls, crating is your only preventative possibility, aside from creating a secure (concrete bottom, chain link walls and top) kennel outside, which I personally wouldn't do because there will always be bad weather days (hot or cold) where that isn't an option no matter where you live.

Destructive behavior when left alone has nothing to do with rank-based hierarchies or respect. In fact, very little in dog training needs to be filtered through the lens of "dominance" or rank. The idea that dogs are pack animals that live in a fixed, linear hierarchy of rank and that that rank is the main motivator and descriptor of all aspects of their behavior is an outdated idea based on a misunderstanding of how social relationships and dominance function in wolf packs, tracing back to some poorly run studies in the 1940's.
If you're interested in learning about the history of this myth, this would be a good read.
If you're interested in learning about learning more about how dominance functions, this might be a good read.
an excerpt that does a good job of distilling the information; "Dominant behavior is a quantitative and quantifiable behavior displayed by an individual with the function of gaining or maintaining temporary access to a particular resource on a particular occasion, versus a particular opponent, without either party incurring injury. If any of the parties incur injury, then the behavior is aggressive and not dominant. Its quantitative characteristics range from slightly self-confident to overtly assertive.

Dominant behavior is situational, individual and resource related. One individual displaying dominant behavior in one specific situation does not necessarily show it on another occasion toward another individual, or toward the same individual in another situation.

Resources are what an organism considers to be life necessities, e.g. food, mating partner, or a patch of territory. The perception of what an animal may consider a resource is species as well as individual related."
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Old 03-07-2019, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstream View Post
Teach her to like her crate, give her fun things to do in her crate, and then use it to prevent her from destroying your house and probably eventually killing herself by ingesting something she shouldn't.

Destructive behavior when left alone has nothing to do with rank-based hierarchies or respect. In fact, very little in dog training needs to be filtered through the lens of "dominance" or rank.
Thank you for this great post @Moonstream!

Yup, the Alpha stuff is nonsense and not helpful in training.

I crate trained my Puma pup to looooove her crate. We used 3 crates as she grew in size. No way would I EVER allow a puppy to run free in my home, work, or outdoors alone. Way too dangerous! Pups get into stuff, eat stuff, and then you can end up with a life threatening medical emergency!!

Think, would you leave a human infant or toddler alone/unattended in your home????? Ummm noooooo, right? Too dangerous. Same with your puppy.

I gradually over time have worked on training and increased Puma's freedom to staying in a baby gated smaller room.

Now she has the freedom to go in and out via doggie door and a baby gated room. We have three dogs, each has their own comfy part of the house when no adult is home.

Maybe you can do the same? Start with crate and work up to larger area as your dog matures and can be trusted to not eat your house down?
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Old 03-07-2019, 07:44 PM
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Dogs, esp super smart and large working breeds need lots of mental stimulation as well as physical exercise. If they are bored they will probably be inclined to make their own fun. Not good as you have seen. And unsafe!

You mentioned what your are doing with her. You said walks, and playing. That is good.

But---What about training? What about tricks? What about brain workouts?

Do you challenger her mind? Give her a job? I teach my dogs all kinds of fun tricks and lessons. Tires them out.

You probably need to really step up both the mental workouts and the physical workouts so that when you do leave her (hopefully in her beloved safe crate) she will be tired enough to rest and relax til you get home.

Hang in there! Pups are fun but oooohhh so much work
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