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My dog won't stop barking

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Old 06-01-2019, 08:12 PM
  #31
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Let's take a happy break: Puma's sweet squirrel encounter today!

Ok so, I really dislike logging off my computer to go home when a topic/thread here has turned negative in flavor for any reason.

Maybe others feel this way, too?

So...in that light, here is a quick happy update on our Puma pup's squirrel watching addiction for any of you guys who are actually following my tales of Puma and her squirrel buddies.


I am still doing my "research' on what our adorable friendly backyard visiting squirrels really looooooove to eat by trying all kinds of foods in our zillion "feeders" which are really re-purposed things like old hanging baskets/ flower pots, etc. And the "penthouse" as my sig other calls the ultra fancy large feeder he made for Puma's squirrel pals. He bought even more strong ropes this week and now we have a huge trapeze system in our backyard for the lil guys to "learn the ropes" and get to the feeders! So much fun watching them all come out after I feed them. Now I know why Puma loooooves watching them.

Anyway-today I moved the feeders around again to keep training the squirrels and filled the feeding stations up with food. Puma generally lays quietly under the feeders waiting for them to come eat. Such elation when they come. Not prey drive elation, either. More like, "Oh goodie, goodie, my favorite friends are here." I watch her body language carefully to make sure we are not increasing her prey drive by doing all this.

So....today....
One lil squirrel actually climbed down the fave tree to the ground where Puma was. They were literally two feet from eachother. They both looked at each other for quite a long time. I watched from the window inside my house, wondering what next? Would Puma's natural prey drive kick in as she is a dog, and she is part terrier. Oy! Poor squirrel.

But NOPE---after they looked at eachother, they were fine together. Puma stayed laying down peacefully in the same spot, tail gently wagging happily at the sight of her friend. The squirrel? He finally casually sauntered up to the ladder where I had put some more yummy snacks for him and his buddies.

I was really amazed at the peaceful calm encounter these two animals shared today. Very sweet. Brought a huge smile to my face and a very nice happy feeling about how sweet and gentle Puma is becoming as she is now one years old and 54 lbs strong. All my taking her to pet stores to teach her how to relax and be gentle in front of other animals has really been paying off as demonstrated here to me today.

Happy training everyone! Hugs to all dogs and peace to all dog lovers out there.
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Old 06-01-2019, 08:33 PM
  #32
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Aaaaawwwe, such a great experience for you and your Puma dog <3 It really put a smile on my face, I imagined that little tail wag, and the cautious curiosity on both sides...or three
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Old 06-01-2019, 08:41 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Further View Post
I have no doubt that there are videos of people training a dog to bark on command so the dog can be taught to not bark on command.

I think it's pointless. The dog already knows how to bark.

I prefer to work with the bark in the moment and develop the dogs power to discriminate between barkable and not barkable disturbances. As Latikos says, it is not difficult and doesn't take long.

Teaching a dog to bark on command seems an unnecessary step to me. I'm not saying it won't work.

Here's something I was writing to myself earlier today, to get me thinking about barking and the level of discrimination a dog can attain.

"Iíd have to think a long time before Iíd start teaching my dog to speak (bark) on command, especially just for the purpose of teaching him to stop barking. A dog already knows how to speak (bark). A dog barks for a reason.

Why confuse the dog by teaching him to bark for no reason other than I say so? I respect my dog more than that.

What Iím looking for in my dog is the ability to think and discriminate on his own. When neighbors & their family members who live next door or across the fenceÖ who leave and enter their home at random times, who climb into a car in the driveway at random times, who do yardwork or take the kitchen garbage out to the garageÖ I need my dog to know that that neighbor living his life is just as unbark worthy as a robin singing on a wire, or squirrel doing acrobatics in a tree.

I do want my dog to alert me if someone other than our neighbors or their family has entered the scene.

To achieve that level of discrimination Iíve been engaging with my dog and his barking behaviors from the night I brought him home from the shelter. I donít have a yard. Iíve a second-floor apartment with a balcony/ sliding door arrangement and he can see 16 of the 22 parking slots from the glass door.

When Iím with him I coach every bark. Thereís a need for this. 4 of the slots are associated with a criminal or terminally disruptive neighbor. I need him to alert me to those elements. Iím not going to be taken by surprise by hooligans that live in my building. Heís rewarded for those barks and I let him bark a few additional times to let the hooligans know that my alarm system is working. Then, I thank my dog, ask him to sit and watch and thank him again. At that point he performs a sit/watch or lays down by the door in relaxed alertness or moves away from the door and lays down again. Heís done his job and this case is closed.

3 of the slots are close friends in the building and heís learned thru socialization and experience to recognize those people and their cars and know thereís no need to bark. One slot is my partnerís and he will bark madly when she comes home, he knows the sound of her car in the parking lot Ö itís a different bark than an alert bark. Itís a happy exciting greeting bark.

That leaves 8 spaces and those spaces relate to the other half of our building and a separate entrance. Over time and coaching and socializing with those neighbors heís learned those spaces to be neutral and non bark worthy.
Also, he barks when thereís a disturbance in the parking lotÖ fighting, arguments, drunks being loud, towing company, a police car or emergency vehicle. In the middle of the night, if Frank barks, I get out of bed and join him at the glass door where we figure it out together.

If this sounds like a lot of work, itís not. Itís just working with my dog one bark at a time and itís a huge thrill to see him learn. Itís fun and immensely satisfying.
He's thinking. When he's at the glass door and I'm on the couch and he barks once twice, then turns his head and looks at me, I know right there that that dog sees me as his partner. That's not a command/obey scenario. That's 2 conscious beings of different species sharing a communication and a trust."


That's from my training journal.
Love it! <3
Yup, I had come across the barking teaching thing looking for help with my adopted senior dog, and decided against it. It made more sense to me to try and desensitize her to the triggers such as people talking to us at the door, strangers visiting inside the home, barking at the neighbours through the fence. We have made some strides...and most important to me is to help this fearful dog to become more confident....it's a work in progress
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Old 06-01-2019, 09:22 PM
  #34
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I think thatís a good point. Iím the same with Nova. I donít need her to bark at our neighbours or people we know, but I want her to alert me if someone comes to our property. The other day a stranger approached our gate, while we were in the backyard and she barked and it was great, as I didnít hear or see the person coming neither did I want the person to walk around the back of our house.

When the pizza delivery guy came today, she started barking and I asked her ďQuiet pleaseĒ and she immediately stopped and I gave her a treat. Obviously she knew there was no reason to keep alerting me. For me itís about building trust - yup totally fine if she barks to alert me, but I want her to be able to stop and quiet down when I ask her to and learn that there are things and people she doesnít need to bark at.

Weíve worked at his for the last week or so and it is really easy...
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Old 06-01-2019, 11:39 PM
  #35
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Of course I meant that OP should train using all positive reinforcement to train speak/quiet, not using an electric collar (which, while doesn't hurt the dog, isnt fair to a dog that doesnt know the command yet). I wouldnt suggest otherwise. However, the crate training idea is much better imo.

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Old 06-05-2019, 08:10 PM
  #36
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Teaching Voice work (barking/sounds) helped immensely with our fearful Gracie dog!

Why I do voice work with my dogs...or training them to speak(bark) and other things:

I actually started training my Gracie dog to bark or speak for completely different reasons than some may think. And no, it wasn't for the sole purpose of teaching "shhh, no bark, quiet please" at all.

So why then did I start doing tons of voice work with my Gracie?


Gracie was extremely nervous or cautious/fearful when I first got her from the shelter. She was returned 4 times in just three years and who knows what else happened to her before I adopted her?? The last family kept her 5 mere days and then threw her back into the shelter. Then she went to foster care for a bit.

Plus she went through heartworm treatment very soon after I got her and we had no trust or bond yet. She endured long and painful... and very scary.... repetitive vet visits for this. Y'all should have heard her screaming at the vet clinic. And they weren't even touching her!! So heartbreaking. Thus, Gracie came back from the vets afraid of basically everyone and surely didn't want to be touched by anyone. Sigh.

So I took her to work with me to my shop everyday so we could work on together time, bonding time, and socialization time. Plus this way I could work on desensitizing and counter conditioning of all things scary. And there were a lot on this list!!

I wanted to teach Gracie that all things were good and safe if they involved me. I introduced her to many, many nice people. We did lots of (very safe, always closely monitored) introductions with treats and fun things to teach her people were safe... and nice!

For her, teaching predictability was key.
Predicatability=safe encounters with new people = happy times, genuine praise, and lots of yummy treats.

Also, Gracie is a touch sensitive dog, meaning she is very weary of strangers touching her, or even us touching her in certain ways, especially early on.

So for me, tricks were a great avenue to helping Gracie. But being in a small space, on a leash for safety, being touch sensitive, working with new people it wasn't always easy or convenient to have her to tons of "movement" tricks like jumping or roll over, etc.

Plus since she wasn't fond of hands on her, I could do voice work tricks where people weren't having to stick their hands on her or touching her at all. Very safe for everyone that way.

So, I incorporated tons of fun "voice work" into our repertoire of tricks. She loved doing the voice tricks-- and she certainly loved getting all the amazing praise and food treats from the new people she met. Win-win. This really helped her to trust people.

Again predictability is so important for shy/fearful/cautious dogs
. She soon learn that if mom introduces her to people, they must be good and nice, and if she does her fun tricks, only good things can happen. Hence people=goodness!

She had tons of voice work on cue that she knows ranging from "Say Meow" (one bark) to "I love you" (three barks) to "Security C" (which she repeats the barks escalating the sound) to singing to "lets talk politics" to "motorcycle" etc etc. Fun stuff.

Also...... as part of my training/conditioning her to not fear our cat, I taught Gracie to"call" our other pets, including Tortie the cat, to meals.
It is a distinct bark she uses to call them, and omg is she super happy when she does her calling job and in walks the cat to eat with us!!

This voice work "job" has really helped her to deal with our cat in a positive way as she is part blue heeler and we all know how much they love/need a job!!!

So for me, teaching my dog to bark or do voice work has been a tremendous help in creating trust... and in boosting Gracie's self confidence... and also learning that doing fun voice tricks with people yields great things!
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Last edited by AthenaLove; 06-05-2019 at 08:15 PM.
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Old 06-05-2019, 09:06 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AthenaLove View Post
Why I do voice work with my dogs...or training them to speak(bark) and other things:

I actually started training my Gracie dog to bark or speak for completely different reasons than some may think. And no, it wasn't for the sole purpose of teaching "shhh, no bark, quiet please" at all.

So why then did I start doing tons of voice work with my Gracie?


Gracie was extremely nervous or cautious/fearful when I first got her from the shelter. She was returned 4 times in just three years and who knows what else happened to her before I adopted her?? The last family kept her 5 mere days and then threw her back into the shelter. Then she went to foster care for a bit.

Plus she went through heartworm treatment very soon after I got her and we had no trust or bond yet. She endured long and painful... and very scary.... repetitive vet visits for this. Y'all should have heard her screaming at the vet clinic. And they weren't even touching her!! So heartbreaking. Thus, Gracie came back from the vets afraid of basically everyone and surely didn't want to be touched by anyone. Sigh.

So I took her to work with me to my shop everyday so we could work on together time, bonding time, and socialization time. Plus this way I could work on desensitizing and counter conditioning of all things scary. And there were a lot on this list!!

I wanted to teach Gracie that all things were good and safe if they involved me. I introduced her to many, many nice people. We did lots of (very safe, always closely monitored) introductions with treats and fun things to teach her people were safe... and nice!

For her, teaching predictability was key.
Predicatability=safe encounters with new people = happy times, genuine praise, and lots of yummy treats.

Also, Gracie is a touch sensitive dog, meaning she is very weary of strangers touching her, or even us touching her in certain ways, especially early on.

So for me, tricks were a great avenue to helping Gracie. But being in a small space, on a leash for safety, being touch sensitive, working with new people it wasn't always easy or convenient to have her to tons of "movement" tricks like jumping or roll over, etc.

Plus since she wasn't fond of hands on her, I could do voice work tricks where people weren't having to stick their hands on her or touching her at all. Very safe for everyone that way.

So, I incorporated tons of fun "voice work" into our repertoire of tricks. She loved doing the voice tricks-- and she certainly loved getting all the amazing praise and food treats from the new people she met. Win-win. This really helped her to trust people.

Again predictability is so important for shy/fearful/cautious dogs
. She soon learn that if mom introduces her to people, they must be good and nice, and if she does her fun tricks, only good things can happen. Hence people=goodness!

She had tons of voice work on cue that she knows ranging from "Say Meow" (one bark) to "I love you" (three barks) to "Security C" (which she repeats the barks escalating the sound) to singing to "lets talk politics" to "motorcycle" etc etc. Fun stuff.

Also...... as part of my training/conditioning her to not fear our cat, I taught Gracie to"call" our other pets, including Tortie the cat, to meals.
It is a distinct bark she uses to call them, and omg is she super happy when she does her calling job and in walks the cat to eat with us!!

This voice work "job" has really helped her to deal with our cat in a positive way as she is part blue heeler and we all know how much they love/need a job!!!

So for me, teaching my dog to bark or do voice work has been a tremendous help in creating trust... and in boosting Gracie's self confidence... and also learning that doing fun voice tricks with people yields great things!
What a cool idea! Teaching fun tricks to shy dogs is a great way to boost their confidence, and it sounds like Gracie had a great time too!

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Old 07-21-2019, 01:00 PM
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i bring my dog to work ( i`m a contractor)
my dog woody , is a cattle dog
they`re , at times high strung
he used to always bark at ,any dog walking by

if i saw someone walking our way, and i could respond before woody would bark , i`d say " woody , get in the truck" i`d say it with meaning , not yelling or angry.
it took some time , but now , when he sees a dog coming , hell` look at me first , and i say " get in the truck wood" and he does, and i say " good boy !" . granted sometimes he`ll still bark , but its becoming less and less.
i guess the key is mis-directing ,
i`d be out there like the one person said , but try to pay attention , and cut your dog off at the pass, and distract , or give him something to do.
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Old 08-04-2019, 03:47 AM
  #39
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Dog training

I had lots of issues my GSD and even my westie (not quite as bad) After trawling the internet I came across this American lady. She does clicker training check her out:

https://tinyurl.com/y548n827
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Old 08-04-2019, 07:31 AM
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Counter conditioning really helped me a lot.
Also keeping a leash on my dog while I was training him helped too. That way if he did something wrong, like barking too much, I just did a quick correction with the words No, quite. Put him in a down stay and it worked. Took a couple days for him to get the hang of it.

I think you gotta take back the control. Right now it seems your dog thinks it has to he the one I’m control. Gotta take that control back, not in a mean way, but start with basic obedience in home, keep the leash on so you can easily correct at home, be consistent, and google counter conditioning.
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