My dog acts weird (tried to hump me)

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My dog acts weird (tried to hump me)

This is a discussion on My dog acts weird (tried to hump me) within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hello everyone, I am new to this forum, but I am also new to owning dogs. I am sorry if this will be long to ...

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Old 03-28-2018, 02:44 PM
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Unhappy My dog acts weird (tried to hump me)

Hello everyone,

I am new to this forum, but I am also new to owning dogs.

I am sorry if this will be long to read, but please bear with me. I am terribly upset right now and I need to provide you with some details...

Three days ago I got my first dog in life.
It had somewhat troublesome past. He probably belonged to someone, got lost, got hit by a car and was bitten by a pack of wild dogs while he was lying hurt.

A woman found him, rescued him and adopted him for 5 months. Now, the woman is going on a trip for 3 months and she needed someone to watch for the dog.

He is a Croatian Sheepdog, and he is 1,5 years old.
He is very fearful, but he is also very nice. Due to this trauma, he is not able to bark.

I managed to teach him to sit and sometimes to come when I call him.

However, the greatest problem I have with him is taking a walk. It is like he never walked in his life before. He pulls on his side, and he is very strong and it is hard to pull him, besides I don't want to do that, but sometimes I am forced to, when he just does whatever he wishes.

I am under stress generally, and I thought it would be relaxing to have this dog by my side.

Yet, half an hour ago we went for a walk and he was acting like a lunatic. He wouldn't go when I would tell him to go somewhere, he would just sit and wouldn't move. When he started running I almost fell, and it is dark outside, I got scared and I yelled at him a couple of times to stop (although I don't usually use this technique, but I was so desperate, I have no idea how to do this anymore, he just doesn't walk normally no matter what I do).

This is the worst part:

When we came home, I was so stressed and upset that I sat and started to cry. He was jumping around me and became more and more excited. Finally, he tried to hump me (and he is very big). I firmly said NO and stood up a couple of times, but he kept going after me. When I sat on a chair, he tried to hump my leg while he was obviously excited, panting. I got horribly mad, I stood up and yelled at him NO! SIT! and he obeyed but it was obvious that he was just waiting for his moment. I had to tell him a couple of times to sit and stop it, and then I walked away from him.

I don't understand... I am scared now... I never had a dog, and I thought dogs are nice and are trying to help when we get sad. Instead he tried to f*** me while I was terribly stressed and upset.

Now I am thinking is this dog even normal? Can I handle this at all? And how can I teach him to walk normally and to be a normal dog??
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Old 03-28-2018, 03:29 PM
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It's totally normal. He was overexcited and over threshold and expressed it through humping you.

Doing it to humans isn't about sex. It's about excitement.

And, I don't know how to say this without sounding offensive but.... he's not there to make you feel better cos he doesn't know you feel bad. He's a dog and he's behaving like a dog.

Dogs only understand us when there is bond between us and them. That bond grows through time and interaction and play.

TBH, for your first dog, you took on a hell of a challenge. He has behavioural issues because of his past and you have no experience with dogs at all, never mind ones with issues. He's also a big strong dog who can pull you around and without knowledge of how to deal with it, it's going to be a long hard journey to form a bond.

None of this is his fault. He's behaving like the dog he is, not as someone who wants to hurt you. And dogs react to our emotions. So if you are already stressed, it isn't helping you or him.

I don't want to make you feel bad but I don't think this is the dog for you. And before you get another one, I recommend volunteering at a dog shelter so you can get some experience without taking on the responsibility.
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Old 03-29-2018, 04:17 AM
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Yeah, you are probably right. You were not being offensive, you just told me the truth.

Thank you for your reply.

It is horribly difficult to walk him; it is as if he had never walked on the leash in his life...

However, his former owner was not helpful either. I called her for help last night because he was pacing in circles, panting and when I would try to take him out, he wouldn't move. When I finally managed to take him out, he didn't do anything, he just sat in the grass. It ended with him pooping on my floor!

The former owner was mad that I called her, and I was desperate, trying to figure out how to help him at 3 AM!

She said that she would maybe come to take him back and find someone else to watch for him...

I don't know what I was doing wrong... He needed to poop, we went out, then he wouldn't poop. It was terrible, I was scared and tired...

If he stays with me, any advice you could give?
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Old 03-29-2018, 04:23 AM
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TBH, no. You need someone with knowledge who can see him and you together and tell you what is going on.

If I were you, I would give him back. There's so much needs doing, it would be better for both of you. And hopefully his owner will be a little more responsible and give him to someone experienced with dogs.
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Old 03-29-2018, 05:02 AM
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yeah, the former owner said she would come tonight to bring him back...

she was the one who told me that he is a good dog for beginners (!). he is indeed calm and nice when he does not have any physiological need, but when he does, it is hard to help him (at least for me).

I was really doing my best, I bought him toys and I played with him and taught him some things, we even ran outside together in these 3 days...

I really don't know what went wrong, and why his owner was not more aware of these problems... I called her for three days straight to bring me his care card, but she would always say that we would meet and then she would turn off her cellphone... I think that she was lying to me as well about some things, and that she wasn't really so nice as I thought..
Yet, I feel bad about all this, like this is all my fault...
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Old 03-29-2018, 05:13 AM
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It's not your fault. It's just a situation that went bad. You had a slightly romantic view of dog ownership and were given a sharper lesson than you deserved. And the owner hasn't really done the best by her dog either but there may be reasons for that so I won't comment.

It's something to learn from and if you do decide to get a dog in the future, this experience will help. I really do recommend doing something with dogs, like a shelter, where you can get experience of them and learn what to do without having the responsibility of the sole care of the dog. They are living thinking beings and have their own personalities and needs. And those needs can be tricky to work out. It would help a lot if dogs could speak Human.
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Old 03-29-2018, 05:36 AM
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True, you are right

Well, I did learn some things, even if it has been just 3 days - I learned some ways a dog behaves and how he shows when he needs something. (I also read a lot in these 3 days)...

Maybe next time I will try with a dog who at least doesn't have troublesome past..

I still feel bad knowing that there are people who can normally raise dogs and it seems I can't... and I feel sorry for him now that he somewhat adapted to live here (he relaxed a bit - he was nervous at the beginning) ...

Thanks again
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Old 03-29-2018, 07:12 AM
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I think you could raise a dog. You're willing to learn and you consider the needs of the dog. This just wasn't the right breed for you.

Sheepdogs are very owner-orientated and find it very hard to get used to someone else. This boy has had 3 owners in his short life, including you. That's tough for him to deal with.

They are also a very active dog and need exercise and, more importantly, something to do. They pick up on training very easily. They need to be kept mentally occupied as well as physically.

I think you would do much better with a calmer, less active dog. One who likes to curl up next to you and sleep. You could do much better with a greyhound or a labrador. Or go smaller and get something like a Pomeranian. Or if you don't want to spend a lot of money, go to a shelter and get a mutt. The people there will help you find a calm one.

As for issues, a lot of older dogs get handed in cos their owner has died or is too frail to look after them. All the older dog wants is a human to love him, somewhere warm to sleep and a toddle round the park twice a day.
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Old 03-29-2018, 01:40 PM
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In case the former owner doesn't get him back, a lot of dogs are trained telling them specific commands to "go pee" or " go potty" or " go poop" or something silly like that. If the former owner didn't tell you that, you could always try telling him those types of commands when you do take him out and see if it helps.
If you look up online how to teach a dog to heel, or look at the training stickies here, if you have treats with you and say heel and reward him for walking nicely at your side and not pulling you, he'll learn quickly that he gets good rewards for not pulling. I also stop and have my dog sit and we don't go anywhere until he stops pulling and is calm and listening to me. So he learned that we don't get anywhere fun unless he's calm and not pulling. My dog is almost ninety pounds and very strong if he does pull and has knocked down a few of my friends who just let him pull and run out of control.
I don't mean any offense to the advice you've already been given. But any dog you take in, handle or even watch or walk is going to have some history of previous owners and could have some issues and problems. Even tiny puppies have fears and could have had bad experiences before you came along so it's not realistic to expect to find a dog with absolutely no issues.
If this dog has already noticeably calmed down and you see an improvement and difference in only three days, and you have absolutely no dog experience, then you shouldn't feel bad at all but are probably doing much better than you think for a beginner!
I've had some very difficult dogs and it took a lot longer than three days for me to make any progress with my current dog.
So don't be too hard on yourself, whether you have this dog for a while or his former owner takes him back. And don't give up on dogs!
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Old 03-30-2018, 05:31 PM
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Just to add.... When a dog humps you or something, please don't assume it is out of excitement, it is actually a very common response to stress! And going by the sounds of that walk you had it seems clear the dog was under stress & fear.
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