Leash training for a stubborn scottie

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Leash training for a stubborn scottie

This is a discussion on Leash training for a stubborn scottie within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; So I purchased an AKC registered scottie Sunday. He is 6 months old and hasn't really been out of his breeders kennel area. She told ...

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Old 07-16-2019, 09:55 AM
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Leash training for a stubborn scottie

So I purchased an AKC registered scottie Sunday. He is 6 months old and hasn't really been out of his breeders kennel area. She told me grass would be new to him. Well I leashed him and have been trying to walk him once at night and once in the morning and my husband tries once in the afternoon, sessions lasting about 30 minutes to one hour. We have set him on grass and cement and he just lays there. The one time I got him to sit and I tried to use the leash to apply pressure to get him to come forward. He rolled over legs shot up in the air and stayed like that till i turned him over.

He also lays in his bed all day and REFUSES to come out of his bed, not even to eat. AT night he barks, i can hear him running around and the kitchen is a mess of toys and he peed, pooped etc. and just had a hoot. But he is gracefully sitting in his bed staring at me(with that exasperated scottie expression and huffs) by the time we wake up.

So, what can i do? Should i start getting him walking around the house outside? should I try a harness? I really want to start obedience classes but if I cant even get him to stand up I don't want to waste money/time. My hope is to get him into agility....eventually.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:55 PM
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I'm so sorry to tell you that you just bought a puppy farm pup. They come with all sorts of behaviour issues because they don't get the care and attention they need growing up.

Please report this to the AKC, they need to know and investigate this breeder.

After that you have a choice of whether to work through this dog's issues or to try to place him with someone who will be able to. dealing with his issues will likely require thousands of dollars, many behaviour consults and huge amounts of your energy. There is no shame on not being able to do that.

First step I'd take is to get him to fear free vet for a check up and a force free/R+ trainer that is kind to dogs.

Good luck!
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Old 07-16-2019, 07:46 PM
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I'm so sorry to tell you that you just bought a puppy farm pup. They come with all sorts of behaviour issues because they don't get the care and attention they need growing up.

Please report this to the AKC, they need to know and investigate this breeder.

After that you have a choice of whether to work through this dog's issues or to try to place him with someone who will be able to. dealing with his issues will likely require thousands of dollars, many behaviour consults and huge amounts of your energy. There is no shame on not being able to do that.

First step I'd take is to get him to fear free vet for a check up and a force free/R+ trainer that is kind to dogs.

Good luck!
The fact that im willing to spend money on agility (which is not necessary) im sure im fine with spending money on a good trainer, im not going to get rid of a dog that has issues. I did not expect a perfect puppy....So i know what a puppy mill is, what is a puppy farm? When I was there, there weren't a bunch of dogs running around.He greeted my kids today, stood up wagged his tail etc. We tried walking again and he found a plastic bag to play with. He did not walk around the bag blew by and he grabbed it.
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Old 07-16-2019, 07:52 PM
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Leash training for a stubborn scottie

I have a Heeler that refuses to walk on a leash as well though he will stay with me off leash. The problem is you can’t walk without a leash everywhere. I plan to seek pro-training help. My Heeler is a year old. I adopted him from a reforming situation. They never leash trained him as they lived in a very rural area with acreage.
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Old 07-16-2019, 09:21 PM
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I have two less-than-perfect dogs so I disagree about rehoming Sherlock and buying another dog.

My opinion/experience is that he needs more time to settle in. I cleared my schedule for a whole week before bringing Laurel home and pretty much did nothing other than bond with the puppy. It was a long time before I ever left the house without her, so I just carried her in a dog sling and used the leash as a safety device just in case.

She would not walk on leash when I wanted to begin training. It just wasn't going to happen. She chewed on it and played with it and firmly planted her little feet down. So much for my own, more modest dreams of Basic Obedience, I grumbled, after doing an online search and seeing what a long road I thought I had ahead of me.

I worked with her patiently but it turned out not to be necessary. When she realized that leashes meant more freedom and was old enough to want it, she stopped biting it, playing with it, refusing to walk on it, etc. on her own and was ready for a puppy class that included age-appropriate tastes of sit, stay, down, come, loose leash walking, etc.

Sherlock is older than Laurel was, so less impressionable, and he has only been home since Sunday. I think he's doing great! Keep on doing what you're doing and find a reputable trainer who has some experience or at least a heart for less-than-perfect dogs and/or shelter dogs and he'll be fine.

Agility eventually, but Sherlock is a kid and probably will be until he is two years old. You absolutely CAN teach an old dog new tricks, as my trainer constantly reminds me, so there's no rush. He doesn't have an expiration date.

Pat Miller has a book that is probably overkill for you and Sherlock, but might be interesting recreational reading or inspiration to get you past any insecurity or negativity:

https://peaceablepaws.com/product/do...st-class-life/
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Last edited by laurelsmom; 07-16-2019 at 09:27 PM.
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Old 07-16-2019, 11:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Sherlockthescottie View Post
The fact that im willing to spend money on agility (which is not necessary) im sure im fine with spending money on a good trainer, im not going to get rid of a dog that has issues. I did not expect a perfect puppy....So i know what a puppy mill is, what is a puppy farm? When I was there, there weren't a bunch of dogs running around.He greeted my kids today, stood up wagged his tail etc. We tried walking again and he found a plastic bag to play with. He did not walk around the bag blew by and he grabbed it.
That's great! I come on pretty seriously because people often don't understand how much work/money a poorly raised puppy can be in need of.

Puppy farm is a nice way of saying puppy mill. If your pup is so under exposed that by 6 months he hasn't seen grass there is something majorly wrong with the breeder. Most mills have facades that look good when they sell a puppy.

If I were to take on a pup like this I would start by letting go of most of my expectations for him and hiring a gentle trainer for a one on one at home consult. He could have many or no behavior issues but an in home consult would be best to work out where to go from here.
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Old 07-16-2019, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by laurelsmom View Post
I have two less-than-perfect dogs so I disagree about rehoming Sherlock and buying another dog.

My opinion/experience is that he needs more time to settle in. I cleared my schedule for a whole week before bringing Laurel home and pretty much did nothing other than bond with the puppy. It was a long time before I ever left the house without her, so I just carried her in a dog sling and used the leash as a safety device just in case.

She would not walk on leash when I wanted to begin training. It just wasn't going to happen. She chewed on it and played with it and firmly planted her little feet down. So much for my own, more modest dreams of Basic Obedience, I grumbled, after doing an online search and seeing what a long road I thought I had ahead of me.

I worked with her patiently but it turned out not to be necessary. When she realized that leashes meant more freedom and was old enough to want it, she stopped biting it, playing with it, refusing to walk on it, etc. on her own and was ready for a puppy class that included age-appropriate tastes of sit, stay, down, come, loose leash walking, etc.

Sherlock is older than Laurel was, so less impressionable, and he has only been home since Sunday. I think he's doing great! Keep on doing what you're doing and find a reputable trainer who has some experience or at least a heart for less-than-perfect dogs and/or shelter dogs and he'll be fine.

Agility eventually, but Sherlock is a kid and probably will be until he is two years old. You absolutely CAN teach an old dog new tricks, as my trainer constantly reminds me, so there's no rush. He doesn't have an expiration date.

Pat Miller has a book that is probably overkill for you and Sherlock, but might be interesting recreational reading or inspiration to get you past any insecurity or negativity:

https://peaceablepaws.com/product/do...st-class-life/
I absolutely did not say to rehome the dog. I put it there as an option because rehoming has such stigma that many who are completely overwhelmed and unable to cope don't feel like it's an option even when it would benefit the dog (which is not what I'm saying is happening here because I don't have enough info.).
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Old 07-17-2019, 12:14 AM
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I absolutely did not say to rehome the dog. I put it there as an option because rehoming has such stigma that many who are completely overwhelmed and unable to cope don't feel like it's an option even when it would benefit the dog (which is not what I'm saying is happening here because I don't have enough info.).
Then I owe you an apology, because I did not mean my post to be a personal attack on you although it obviously came off that way.

There are systemic issues that affect dogs as well as people. Classism in the US is one that we simply can't fix right now, as are puppy farms[1] and retail rescue[2].

Perhaps I am simply not a good fit for this community and should wish you all well and go somewhere else.

[1]https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/our-resources/kennel-club-campaigns/puppy-farming/

[2] I duck duck went that term and you can too.
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Old 07-17-2019, 02:02 AM
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Are you okay @laurelsmom ? I clarified so that it was clear that i wasn't saying to rehome the dog and why I put that option out there. I'm just a single user on this forum so please don't leave on my account. I've been told on more than one occasion I have all the tact of a brick to the face and I'm pretty sure that's true. I'll work on the way I say things in future.
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Old 07-17-2019, 07:07 AM
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Your dog sounds very similar to my Cairn terrier who also came from a breeder, but I got her at almost 5 years. She had been on grass but was completely untrained on a lead and also completely un house trained. She was timid for months outside the home and only walked 100 meters at a time for months. Even now she walks just in short bursts on a lead. But what an beautiful nature! Just so sweet with everyone and her tail goes mad. It all just took time.

Cairns and Scottie’s are similar I think, in that there is a fair dose of not really caring for training in the same way as the herding dogs do. I’ve never been sure if it’s timidity or just having an “independent” streak.

However, we have seen great improvements with lots of routine, affection and persistence.

The other thing I do is go to the same place every time for walks. It wouldn’t suit most dogs but I think it helps a dog who is adjusting to change.


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