Insecure GSD training

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Insecure GSD training

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Old 08-21-2017, 06:24 AM
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Unhappy Insecure GSD training

Hey everyone:

My dad has a 1 year old GSD male, not sterelized. He's a really good dog, but when we try to make obedience exercices with him he gets paralized of fear. He's really insecure, and the thing gets worse when we try to train him. [ears down, he avoids having eye contact with us, and he tries to escape from the situation] No matter the treats we use with him. I've tried training him tied, me giving the commands while somebody was holding him, and it seems that he prefers this, but we can't improve working like this.

We obviously use positive training method. Apart from that, He's a fantastic dog, always after us, and searching for pettings.



żAny recommendations?
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Old 08-21-2017, 01:53 PM
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Will the dog give you his engagement during play sessions? If so, I'd start from there and slowly work a bit of training in via luring and then get back to the playing.
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Old 08-21-2017, 02:03 PM
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Will the dog give you his engagement during play sessions? If so, I'd start from there and slowly work a bit of training in via luring and then get back to the playing.
No, he doesn't, he's okey during the play sessions. He shows this only on training sessions.
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Old 08-21-2017, 02:23 PM
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No, he doesn't, he's okey during the play sessions. He shows this only on training sessions.

If the dog is okay during play sessions and shows interest in you then that's where I would start from. Keep it super simple, very brief and sneak the tiniest bit of training in during your play sessions. If he exhibits the slightest attitude similar to his training sessions, go back to the play. Does he like to play ball/fetch or chase items?

Whether it's insecurity, frustration or a bad association to your training sessions, you need to keep any pressure off your dog so you can get him to interact with you in a way which the dog enjoys.

From your description of the training sessions, it sounds like your dog is exhibiting avoidance behavior. Research avoidance behavior in dogs and that might get you going in the correct direction with your dog.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:57 AM
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If the dog is okay during play sessions and shows interest in you then that's where I would start from. Keep it super simple, very brief and sneak the tiniest bit of training in during your play sessions. If he exhibits the slightest attitude similar to his training sessions, go back to the play. Does he like to play ball/fetch or chase items?

Whether it's insecurity, frustration or a bad association to your training sessions, you need to keep any pressure off your dog so you can get him to interact with you in a way which the dog enjoys.

From your description of the training sessions, it sounds like your dog is exhibiting avoidance behavior. Research avoidance behavior in dogs and that might get you going in the correct direction with your dog.
Okay, we will start from super simple play sessions with him, and slowly introduce a bit of training.

He doesn't like to chase anything, i've tried already with balls and he doesn't show interest in them.

I'll search everything I can about avoidance behavior.

Thank you very much, DriveDog.
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:34 AM
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He doesn't like to chase anything, i've tried already with balls and he doesn't show interest in them.

.
I know your GSD is 1 year old but I'm a believer in it's never too late to get on the proper track. This video link describes the importance of creating or increasing engagement between dog and trainer. As stated in the video, "you have to have what they want". Generally, you indulge the dog's instincts/drives in a fashion which is acceptable and beneficial to the training process and overall core relationship. Leerburg On Demand | The Importance of ENGAGEMENT in Dog Training


And here's a video of what a wonderfully engaged dog looks like. Notice the obedience mixed in with the play and how it has a beginning and a very defined ending.

Another thought regarding your dog and his "insecurity" and reluctance during training sessions, you might have a very "soft" dog and the way in which you or your father have doled out corrections or possibly made it too confusing/frustrating has impacted the dog's attitude toward these training sessions. I don't know if this will make sense but I have always rewarded my dogs in one fashion or another for TRYING not just necessarily for success.
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Old 08-22-2017, 10:51 AM
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I know your GSD is 1 year old but I'm a believer in it's never too late to get on the proper track. This video link describes the importance of creating or increasing engagement between dog and trainer. As stated in the video, "you have to have what they want". Generally, you indulge the dog's instincts/drives in a fashion which is acceptable and beneficial to the training process and overall core relationship. Leerburg On Demand | The Importance of ENGAGEMENT in Dog Training


And here's a video of what a wonderfully engaged dog looks like. Notice the obedience mixed in with the play and how it has a beginning and a very defined ending.Michael Ellis Engagement Training With His Dog Pi - YouTube

Another thought regarding your dog and his "insecurity" and reluctance during training sessions, you might have a very "soft" dog and the way in which you or your father have doled out corrections or possibly made it too confusing/frustrating has impacted the dog's attitude toward these training sessions. I don't know if this will make sense but I have always rewarded my dogs in one fashion or another for TRYING not just necessarily for success.
Yes, it makes sense for me, we'll do that too, rewarding him also when we see he's trying to work, (something that happens very rarely)... Anyway, I think we have to be very patient with him, it will probably be a long work.

Thank you for the video!! Although he doesn't show interest for balls, or any other objects, we'll try to adapt what we saw in the video in order to improve his self confidence, the problem is that we really don't now how to play with him, apart from making him chasing us. I thought that adapting that game so that he had to seat while we hid someplace and then search us when we asked him to would be a good idea of mixing a bit of obedience exercises in the play session. I think this is working, cause he seems to show a bit of interest on this.

Last edited by gattymu; 08-22-2017 at 10:56 AM.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:43 PM
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the problem is that we really don't now how to play with him, apart from making him chasing us.
Chasing is good as GSDs love to chase moving objects but I have to laugh a bit because for many a higher prey driven dog owner, chasing is a problem but one can certainly utilize the instinct to their benefit in the overall process. Try the flirt pole idea, you don't need to buy one as they're easy enough to make, maybe you already have.

Anyway, best of luck working with your dog and I have a feeling you'll be perceptive enough to figure out what makes your dog want what you have to offer as you captivate his attention and you'll learn to rely on each other for upbeat times together.
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Old 08-23-2017, 03:42 AM
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Anyway, best of luck working with your dog and I have a feeling you'll be perceptive enough to figure out what makes your dog want what you have to offer as you captivate his attention and you'll learn to rely on each other for upbeat times together.
I hope so!! Thank you very much, I hope we have results soon.
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