How to get a dog to stop biting?

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How to get a dog to stop biting?

This is a discussion on How to get a dog to stop biting? within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Okay, so I have this 4 month old puppy. He's a Labrador/Border Collie/Blue Heeler mix. We've had him for about 3 weeks now and at ...

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Old 06-21-2013, 01:18 AM
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How to get a dog to stop biting?

Okay, so I have this 4 month old puppy. He's a Labrador/Border Collie/Blue Heeler mix. We've had him for about 3 weeks now and at first he was playful biting but now it's gotten worst. He no longer wants to nip at you or give playful bites. Now he is lunging to the neck, leaving black and blue marks and drawing blood. He's already 40 pounds and he's going to double that weight. If it's hard to control him now, it's gonna be even harder to control him when he is 80 lbs! We're thinking of getting rid of him, but first I wanted to know. Is this normal? Is he going to grow out of it since he's still a puppy? And is there anyway to train him?

We've been doing all we can but he's not just biting for fun anymore or just when we take items out of his mouth that he shouldn't be eating, he's just randomly jumping up and biting. Last night I almost lost my ear, then today my dad's face almost gotten torn off. Doesn't seem like puppy-ish behavior to me.

Thanks!
~Duskiee
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Old 06-21-2013, 02:27 AM
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What methods have you tried so far?
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:43 AM
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We have so many threads on "puppy biting" that you could read which would help you a lot. Do a site search, or peruse the puppy help section. Recently we've had some really tough puppies and have coached people extensively. Take a look...

Here are a few

https://www.dogforum.com/puppy-help/p...clothes-28448/
https://www.dogforum.com/puppy-help/s...-biting-43601/
https://www.dogforum.com/puppy-help/h...-needed-43905/
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Old 06-21-2013, 12:24 PM
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Oh okay, thank you very much.

Also the methods we tried were like the squirt bottle, pushing him off of us, ect. The vet told us to knee him but I'd be too afraid that what if one of us accidentally kneed him too hard?
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Old 06-21-2013, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Duskiee View Post
Oh okay, thank you very much.

Also the methods we tried were like the squirt bottle, pushing him off of us, ect. The vet told us to knee him but I'd be too afraid that what if one of us accidentally kneed him too hard?
All those are very harsh methods and will likely both fail to work, and create unintended "fallout"... meaning because these methods are borderline abusive, there will be repercussions for him, such as later on developing aggression issues.

Here, let me elaborate...

Mostly when people get rough with their dogs in an attempt to calm them down, the dog gets even more stimulated and animated and even more out of control. I would suspect that will be the case with your dog, as you describe him. He would interpret your rough handling as some sort roughhousing and would respond in kind, the two of you escalating the interaction until it could become real aggression right there, right then.

If on the other hand if he responded to the rough treatment by submitting and being intimidated, cowering and stopping his behavior, that is when you need to be concerned about fallout at a later time because you have frightened him and later on he may come back at you in self defense in another situation, because what you have taught him is that you are a scary dangerous person.

As a rule of thumb with dog training, you will get what you give. That is if you want a calm, relaxed dog, you must train him in a calm relaxed way. You are not going to get calm-relaxed by being harsh, physical and stimulating.
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Last edited by Tess; 06-21-2013 at 01:00 PM.
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Old 06-21-2013, 01:38 PM
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I'll just jump in here to say that two of the three threads Tess posted above were started by me about my pup. In just the last month I've had him, with the help of everyone here including Tess, my boy has become much MUCH better about not biting. And I have become much calmer (usually) in dealing with him when he forgets and tries it again every once in awhile. So definitely read the threads and try the advice given. It should help!
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Old 06-21-2013, 02:16 PM
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Thanks Cobbersmom

Another rule of thumb I wanted to throw out there is... If you woild not do it to your kid, do not do it to your dog.

Most people would never squirt their kid or knee them in the chest. Dogs are very sensitive creatures and we do not need to be harsh and clumsy in our communication with them.
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Old 06-21-2013, 02:49 PM
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Thanks Cobbersmom

Another rule of thumb I wanted to throw out there is... If you woild not do it to your kid, do not do it to your dog.

Most people would never squirt their kid or knee them in the chest. Dogs are very sensitive creatures and we do not need to be harsh and clumsy in our communication with them.
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That's true, thank you.

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Originally Posted by CobbersMom View Post
I'll just jump in here to say that two of the three threads Tess posted above were started by me about my pup. In just the last month I've had him, with the help of everyone here including Tess, my boy has become much MUCH better about not biting. And I have become much calmer (usually) in dealing with him when he forgets and tries it again every once in awhile. So definitely read the threads and try the advice given. It should help!
Thanks CobbersMom

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tess View Post
All those are very harsh methods and will likely both fail to work, and create unintended "fallout"... meaning because these methods are borderline abusive, there will be repercussions for him, such as later on developing aggression issues.

Here, let me elaborate...

Mostly when people get rough with their dogs in an attempt to calm them down, the dog gets even more stimulated and animated and even more out of control. I would suspect that will be the case with your dog, as you describe him. He would interpret your rough handling as some sort roughhousing and would respond in kind, the two of you escalating the interaction until it could become real aggression right there, right then.

If on the other hand if he responded to the rough treatment by submitting and being intimidated, cowering and stopping his behavior, that is when you need to be concerned about fallout at a later time because you have frightened him and later on he may come back at you in self defense in another situation, because what you have taught him is that you are a scary dangerous person.

As a rule of thumb with dog training, you will get what you give. That is if you want a calm, relaxed dog, you must train him in a calm relaxed way. You are not going to get calm-relaxed by being harsh, physical and stimulating.
Thank you very much. I understand that, but it's what the vet told us to do though with the squirting and kneeing. I didn't knee him though. :/
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Old 06-21-2013, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Duskiee View Post
Thank you very much. I understand that, but it's what the vet told us to do though with the squirting and kneeing. I didn't knee him though. :/
Vets know quite a bit about animal anatomy & physiology, diagnosis & treatment of disease, and other medical matters. Many, however, do not know much about training and behavior.

It's like asking your pediatrician how to teach your kid to read. Some may have excellent ideas, but you'd likely get more educated advice from a teacher.
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Old 06-21-2013, 03:27 PM
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Yup, you'll find vets know medicine, but often do not know much about behavior or training. You are going to find some of the members here are professional dog trainers/behaviorists (not me though... I'm a novice) and they all know far more about how to deal with behavior issues than most vets. Its hard not to listen to voices of authority whom we respect, but as you learn more, you'll be able to distinguish good and bad advice better.
Here is an interesting post.
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