How can my dog have separation anxiety AND be a runaway with lousy recall???!!!

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior

How can my dog have separation anxiety AND be a runaway with lousy recall???!!!

This is a discussion on How can my dog have separation anxiety AND be a runaway with lousy recall???!!! within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; My dog is supposedly a lab and German Shepherd mix from a shelter that I got at 16 months of age at the end of ...

User Tag List

Like Tree3Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-08-2017, 11:34 PM
  #1
Senior Member
 
Shadowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Cambridge MA
Posts: 1,277
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
How can my dog have separation anxiety AND be a runaway with lousy recall???!!!

My dog is supposedly a lab and German Shepherd mix from a shelter that I got at 16 months of age at the end of March 2016. He turns 3 in November 2017. He's had 2 homes before me, his last home only had him 2 months before giving him to a shelter on the Cape. His first home gave him to the second home because they were moving. He was a confirmed escape artist before I got him, broke out of a crate, never was alone apparently and not well socialized to strangers or dogs. Freaked out and got sick in the shelter so bad he had to be kept on a whole separate floor. Kennel cough, worms, lousy coat, took months to get him healthy. Very anxious and skittish, never lived in the city, afraid of tall men, strangers, anyone with hats. When I first got him it woukd take him half an hour or more to relax enough to pee outside, any distracting noise would stop him. He'd find any opening in any yard and jump fences, open gates, chew leahes, slip out of harnesses and just take off. Took me half an hour or an hour every day in the dog park to catch him with treats and a leash left on him. Shelt er strongly advised leaving one on. They couldn't catch him either and while there he lasted 20 minutes tops in the intro obedience class before he freaked and had to leave. Loves other dogs at first he would run full tilt at every other dog and charge to play or hump them. He learned fast that didn't work so well and to be more polite. I learned squeaky noises and bacon treats helped me catch him.
We graduated the shelters basic obedience class, with bacon treats he learned a bunch of commands in less than a couple of months. He's very smart. Sit, stay, down, roll over, roll all the way over, roll all the way back, bring the ball, give paw, give other paw, give kisses, back up, up, dance, bow, fix your foot (tangled in leash), drop it, leave it, give, come here, heel. He went from barking and lunging at strangers to going lots of places with me and actively approaching people wagging his tail and sniffing them and leaning up against them for scratches and butt rubs. We even watched fireworks in a crowd on July 4th and he lay at my feet relaxed. He doesn't attack my horses anymore but let the friendly one sniff him and quietly stays at a respectful distance by the older cranky one.
Problems are he can be loose in some situations and will stay with me, but still randomly takes off if he sees an animal like a dog to play with or a rabbit to chase. And he just doesn't seem enthusiastic or sharp about doing anything I ask him. He hates fetch or any playing with me. All the treats and praise and his favorite squeaky toys in the world can get maybe 4 or 5 throws with him fetching. Then he just looks at the ball like yeah right. Even when he does fetch he runs after it and casually walks back
If we go to the park and none of his best buddies are there to wrestle with he just wanders around sniffing things or lies down until we leave. He won't play with new dogs or dogs he knows but aren't his best buddies, then is up all night hyper from no exercise. I can't let him loose at the stable because I can't trust him not to take off. Unless I'm holding a bacon treat under his nose he just isn't enthusiastic for anything I do with him. Only for playing with his best buddies. He's been medically checked out and is healthy. He has ibd and gets medicine and as much of a special diet as he will eat.
My last dog never left my side ever and got his exercise at the stable running along in the state forest while I rode my horse for hours. He loved fetch with me and would enthusiastically run and play with me until he dropped.
This dog ambles along with his tail wagging but never seems excited and will still take off even though I spoil him rotten. He's slow to do anything I ask him but if I repeat a command or start to feel frustrated he senses it and shuts down. He's very sensitive and anxious and will hide in his crate if he thinks I'm mad even if I'm holding his favorite treats. But doesn't stop hom from taking off or chewing my car or leashes. He chews everything and us destroying my car even though I always have treats and antlers for him to chew. It's hard to figure out our bond because he's also very attached to me and has bad separation anxiety that started when I moved a few months after I got him. His 1st home that had him his 1st 13 months gave him up when they moved. The minute he saw boxes and me packing he flipped out. He's on medication and I see a behaviorist every so often. He's friendly and happy when I'm anywere even if he ignores me. But if I leave the room or dog park even for a second, he gets worried and stops all play and interaction and goes to the gate or door and just stares where I went until I come back.
I started testing him being loose at the stable because I didn't want him to be banned. When I tied him in the aisle while I fed and cleaned the stalls of the horses and did chores for a couple of hours, whenever I'm too far or he can't see me he barks and whines nonstop. He also barked nonstop at every person that came in including the owner, even if he knew them. They could walk right up to him while barking and pat him no problem but it was scaring some of the kids and irritating the mom's and spooking some horses and obnoxious. So I tried letting him be loose and heel and stay right with me and in the horse and feed stalls. He was great for that until I went outside then he vanished. Owner brought him back said he was on other side of property and as soon as he heard me calling he freaked trying to go to me.
If he's so anxious and afraid to be away from me why does the mutt keep taking off a year and a half later?
Sorry for the long post but it makes no sense to me and it's really the one thing that I can't stand or deal with. I wind up staying angry with him for hours and don't even want to keep him or spend so much money on behaviorists or ibd vets aND special diets and all these meds on a dog who can't even be loyal and doesn't seem to care about being around me or like to play with me. I know I'm not being objective and taking it too personally and I can't compare him to my last dog who I had for almost 12 years but recall was never an issue once. This dog has taken off so many times. I've had to chain him in my car at first because he used to jump out. I don't really want to give him up I do love him very much but the runaway stuff just really drives me nuts. Whenever he comes when called I always make a big fuss over him and pat him in all his favorite places and give him treats while saying good come here in a happy puppy voice. If he ignores me I'll call him again. If he really ignores me I'll call his name and say come on I'm leaving now and go to leave the park or wherever. Then still praise him but no treat since he didn't respond as fast.
Shadowmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2017, 09:32 AM
  #2
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boston metro-area, USA
Posts: 1,885
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Arrow i'm responding to the *title*, not the longer post...

so i'm not reading the details, at the moment. // This isn't directed at the OP, but is general-info re Separation Anxiety.

Sep-anx is the single most-overdiagnosed problem behavior; many dogs are tagged with it, who Do Not Have It.

Average age of Dx is 18-MO; i constantly see folks claim their 9-WO pup has Sep-Anx! - Forget it; separation distress is NOT sep-anx.
Separation-distress is the response of any infant / neonate that should be with siblings, or with Mum, & finds themselves alone. A duckling or gosling peeping, a young pup whining or yipping, etc, are DISTRESS, not sep-anx.

Sep-Anx is AN ANXIETY ATTACK - caused by missing either a specific person, or persons in general. // It's not "lonely", it's terror & it's intense.
Symptoms are *attempts to escape* - not "my dog barks", but MY DOG DIGS THE LINOLEUM OFF THE FLOOR AT THE DOORWAY.

MY DOG JUMPS *THRU* CLOSED WINDOWS OR STORM-DOORS, SHATTERING THEM.

MY DOG RIPPED THE PAINT OFF THE DOOR, DUG A HOLE IN IT, & HAS SPLINTERS IN HER PAW-PADS.

MY DOG CHEWED A CLOSED HOLLOW-CORE DOOR, & HAS SPLINTERS IN HER PALATE.

MY DOG BROKE CLAWS OFF, TRYING TO GET OUT OF A CRATE.
Less-intense cases may shred the paint off the door, gnaw the doorsill of the shipping-crate, etc.

Howling in the living-room while sitting in the middle of the floor is not sep-anx.
Metronomic barking isn't sep-anx, either [arf... arf... arf... ].

Dogs with sep-anx are not usually soothed by another *pet* being present -
some want A Specific Person, most just want 'any human'.
Going to dog-daycare can help, not cuz there are 'other dogs' but there are PEOPLE there.
A pet-sitter can help; the pre-teen down the street, the neighbor with a dog s/he plays with, etc.

Lots of dogs carry the label, often they are never seen by an experienced trainer nor a CAAB / vet-behaviorist / other credentialed pro.
It's like me saying my dog has diabetes or is hypothyroid, but i never take the dog to the vet - my opinion, however educated or informed, isn't a diagnosis.


- terry

leashedForLife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2017, 11:35 AM
  #3
Senior Member
 
Shadowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Cambridge MA
Posts: 1,277
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
so i'm not reading the details, at the moment. // This isn't directed at the OP, but is general-info re Separation Anxiety.

Sep-anx is the single most-overdiagnosed problem behavior; many dogs are tagged with it, who Do Not Have It.

Average age of Dx is 18-MO; i constantly see folks claim their 9-WO pup has Sep-Anx! - Forget it; separation distress is NOT sep-anx.
Separation-distress is the response of any infant / neonate that should be with siblings, or with Mum, & finds themselves alone. A duckling or gosling peeping, a young pup whining or yipping, etc, are DISTRESS, not sep-anx.

Sep-Anx is AN ANXIETY ATTACK - caused by missing either a specific person, or persons in general. // It's not "lonely", it's terror & it's intense.
Symptoms are *attempts to escape* - not "my dog barks", but MY DOG DIGS THE LINOLEUM OFF THE FLOOR AT THE DOORWAY.

MY DOG JUMPS *THRU* CLOSED WINDOWS OR STORM-DOORS, SHATTERING THEM.

MY DOG RIPPED THE PAINT OFF THE DOOR, DUG A HOLE IN IT, & HAS SPLINTERS IN HER PAW-PADS.

MY DOG CHEWED A CLOSED HOLLOW-CORE DOOR, & HAS SPLINTERS IN HER PALATE.

MY DOG BROKE CLAWS OFF, TRYING TO GET OUT OF A CRATE.
Less-intense cases may shred the paint off the door, gnaw the doorsill of the shipping-crate, etc.

Howling in the living-room while sitting in the middle of the floor is not sep-anx.
Metronomic barking isn't sep-anx, either [arf... arf... arf... ].

Dogs with sep-anx are not usually soothed by another *pet* being present -
some want A Specific Person, most just want 'any human'.
Going to dog-daycare can help, not cuz there are 'other dogs' but there are PEOPLE there.
A pet-sitter can help; the pre-teen down the street, the neighbor with a dog s/he plays with, etc.

Lots of dogs carry the label, often they are never seen by an experienced trainer nor a CAAB / vet-behaviorist / other credentialed pro.
It's like me saying my dog has diabetes or is hypothyroid, but i never take the dog to the vet - my opinion, however educated or informed, isn't a diagnosis.


- terry

Thanks for the general reply but since this is the training thread I was really hoping for more specific tips from people, like lots of other people on here get. My post is long because he's a complex dog with a complex history.
He doesn't have separation distress it's fI'll out separation anxiety. He's ripped air conditioner out of windows and tried to jump out of 3rd floor windows within 10 seconds of me trying to leave for work,. He's ripped window screens, endangering him and my cars. He broke a door and destroyed a room including destroying the flooring at my last apartment. He's destroying my car from staying in there for short times with ac on and bones and chews for short times. A well known and respected behaviorist at Tufts said he was the worst case of separation ANXIETY he's ever seen. He's on medication for over a year now. I try to follow the behavioral interventions but he won't eat or drink a single thing if I leave him at home. He has ibd so should have a limited diet which complicates things more. He stops all interactions with anyone and gets frantic and has chewed 8 leashes to escape the second I leave his sight. FRANTIC. NOT barking but flipping out. But he also runs away if loose in large open spaces outside and his recall could use improvementafter 1.5 years.
Try reading my original post please, it's long for a reason. Behaviorist will only work on 1 issue at a time and charges an arm and a leg each time.
Shadowmom is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 09-09-2017, 06:10 PM
  #4
Senior Member
 
Markie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,485
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
It sounds as if he doesn't trust you he trusts the treats. Him being moved from home to home probably caused it. It also sounds as if maybe the owners before you yelled at him a lot and now he sensitive to it. I would maybe try praising him for the littlest of things for example eating pet him show him you love him. The fact he doesn't play with other dogs other then his friends isn't really a problem some dogs only like certain dogs. When training him I would never yell and try to keep yourself calm and not getting to angry at him for it. It sounds as if he is trying to tell if your trust worthy or not. I would do the training at home him being a German Shepherd kind of makes him a hard head on some thing but usually they catch on pretty fast on most things. His kennel is where he feels safe it's his den something he knows will always be there. Him chewing the leashes is him wanting away from you he figures he can do it on his own and he doesnt like the leash. I would make him deal with it you could use a show leash those are pretty hard to chew through and he really won't have enough lead to think about running off because he will be right next to you.
Markie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2017, 07:59 PM
  #5
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,404
Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Shadowmom,

I don't have much to add but I'd be a liar to suggest I don't have an opinion. So, my default, just like dog's default to certain behaviors which all make sense to the dog but maybe not to us at times, is basically the old adage " you train/deal with the dog in front of you". I think Markie makes great sense in her/his reply in many ways, essentially this " It sounds as if he doesn't trust you he trusts the treats.". I don't suggest this in a diminishing way but more in the light that you seem to have a real hard case to deal with compared to most and progress going forward is probably not as simple as some cookie cutter procedure. Win the dog's trust if you haven't already and once you have, instill the idea of being a "team", reliant on each other in a unique fashion. Easier said than done but you are a good soul for trying so hard for your wonderful buddy. Your efforts will be rewarded.
AlwaysTomboy likes this.
DriveDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2017, 04:37 PM
  #6
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boston metro-area, USA
Posts: 1,885
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Arrow waist leash? // Long line & Y-harness? // BIKE CABLE.

have U tried wearing him, on a waist-leash?
It won't do a thing for his mostly-OK-sometimes-nonexistent recall, but it will prevent him running off when he sees another dog 150-ft away.
Maybe a possibility??

Skijor harnesses are good, sturdy tie-downs. // I like the ones made by NookSack Racing - there's a simple waist-belt, & a heftier lumbar-wedge with thigh straps.

A simple belt run thru belt-loops, with the wrist-loop of his leash slipped on whichever side U prefer, may not hold if he really lunges hard - the belt-loops might pop off, & the sudden lurch could send U to the ground in a heap.
U know how he reacts - does he take off like a launched rocket, or does he just tug hard?

As for "chewing leashes", i'd invest in a vinyl-dipped bicycle cable with double-ended spring clips AND swivels on both ends - a 4-ft length of cable would let U tie him securely: run the cable AROUND a suitable object, clip one clip to the cable as a running noose, clip the free end to his limited-slip martingale collar or a snug high-set buckle collar.
He can gnaw on a body-harness, so i wouldn't use one if he's tied temporarily - he might cut thru it. // He can't gnaw thru a steel cable.

Obv, U can't tie him anywhere that would leave him vulnerable to passersby or other dogs, etc - but i'm sure U know that.
- terry


leashedForLife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 02:19 AM
  #7
Senior Member
 
Shadowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Cambridge MA
Posts: 1,277
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Thanks for the replies and advice everyone. Tying him to my waist could get a little hairy, he doesn't just tug a little hard, if he sees a rabbit or rat or something to chase, he goes from zero to sixty like a launched rocket. Twice last winter when there was snow and ice he literally yanked me straight off my feet. This happens when he hasn't had enough exercise. He's also knocked down at least 3 grown men all weighing more than 200 pounds that I can remember. He pulled my one friend right into a pole the other day, luckily the friend was able to grab the pole. From one day of not going to the dog park. He's actually very good walking on the leash with me and listening to heel and not pulling in general, it's when random triggers like other dogs he has to go meet happen. Or bicycles or skateboards or animals to chase. And it's always when I'm carrying a million bags of groceries and don't have my full attention on him and he hasn't had enough exercise. If I'm completely focused on him he's usually controllable if it's not icy out.
Which is why him not liking to play unless it's his select group of dog friends can be a problem. It's fine that he's cautious with new dogs but he won't play with me. If we're alone in the park he won't play fetch much or run on his own or get tired then he's more hyper and reactive and harder to control walking on the leash and up all night tearing around. Plus I miss the bond of having a dog that thinks I'm fun to play with too.
As far as praise and patting to build our bond and his trust in me, I do that already. I'm always patting and praising him for the slightest good things he does and telling him how smart and gorgeous he is. He'll sleep in the bed with me a lot but not all the time, and he loves belly and chest rubs, which I'll give him nonstop. He'll literally wrap his paw around my arm and hold my hand on his chest and keep it there if I try to stop. If we're anywhere in public he stays very close to me and if anything happens to startle or scare him like a sudden loud construction noise, he'll lean and press very close to me, like for reassurance. Sometimes in public he'll randomly give me his paw and just want to sit like that with me holding his paw for a long time. He used to get into squabbles with male unneutered dogs at the park until he got a gash on his ear and I think scared by a bigger dog by him that used to be his buddy that kind of flipped and several of us had to pry off of my dogs ear. Since then at any hint of conflict or fight among dogs there, he runs to me and leans close and avoids any kind of fight. All of the times he's chewed his leashes recently have been when he's nervous with someone new in the car with us who he didn't know well, or if tied and I wasn't in his sight to break loose to get to me, not away from me.
The two prior times he got loose at the stable accidentally he ran straight to me. He's also good in the actual barn area about staying right with me loose, which is why the running off when we went outside immediately surprised me, since he seems more bonded and clingy.
With his past he may not fully trust me, but he wants to have me in sight all the time, except when he goes to chase something. Even at the dog park, he can be playing with his best buddies but if I leave for a minute to get something from my car, he'll stop playing and watch me from the gate or fence and stop all interactions until I come back. At the stable if i tie or chain him so I can do chores or exercise a horse and am too far away or out of sight, he barks and whines nonstop even if he can hear me.
Shadowmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 10:09 AM
  #8
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boston metro-area, USA
Posts: 1,885
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Lightbulb 2 possibilities

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowmom View Post

...
Tying him to my waist could get a little hairy, he doesn't just tug a little hard, if he sees a rabbit or rat or something to chase, he goes from zero to sixty like a launched rocket.

Twice last winter when there was snow and ice, he literally yanked me straight off my feet. This happens when he hasn't had enough exercise.
He's also knocked down at least 3 grown men all weighing more than 200 pounds that I can remember. He pulled my one friend right into a pole the other day, luckily [he] was able to grab the pole. From one day of not going to the dog park.

He's actually very good walking on the leash with me and listening to heel and not pulling in general, it's when random triggers, like other dogs he must go meet, happen. Or bicycles or skateboards or animals, to chase.

And it's always when I'm carrying a million bags of groceries and don't have my full attention on him and he hasn't had enough exercise. If I'm completely focused on him, he's usually controllable... if it's not icy out.

...
2 things spring to mind:
a headcollar, preferably a Gentle Leader, or a chest-clipped Y-harness.

The harness is put-it-on-&-go, it merely requires to be fitted properly; any headcollar requires pre-conditioning B4 use, so generally i use the chest-clipped harness *during* the period when i'm conditioning the headcollar.

Any sturdy, well-made Y-harness will do; i wish they still made the Sure-Fit, as it DID fit every dog i ever put it on, with 5 buckles to adjust the straps on the girth, the shoulder layback, the sternum, & the spine.
It should fit snugly, with box stitching everywhere one strap crosses another & beside every piece of hardware: buckle, slide, D-rings. // On a smooth-coated dog, the haircoat should bristle slightly along the edges of the straps, as the skin & muscle is slightly depressed by the fitted strap.
On a double-coated dog, the haircoat should have visible 'tracks' left by each strap when the harness comes off, which vanish when the dog shakes-off to settle the coat.

A pinky fingetip should barely-fit between the dog & the harness; U should need to worm it under the strap, not be able to casually slip it beneath. // The reason U want it snug is to prevent constant slipping, which can create harness-galls, friction burns, & either break-off or mat the hairs - depending on the texture of the coat. Galls are painful & slow to heal.

Always CHECK THE DOG OVER where the harness lay, when U take it off, & again B4 putting it on - just in case; push the hair back against its direction of growth to take a quick peek at the skin.
Look for persistent-pink areas [a pressure-sore in the making], grass awns, splinters, burrs, bruises, cuts / bites / punctures, & anything else that might hurt or cause pain when the harness is buckled.
Remove any mats as soon as they form, & if there's the smallest mat or knot UNDER the harness, take it out B4 U use the harness again.

Once fitted, there should be minimal slipping - if U stand beside the dog with a hand on the belly-band & one on the shoulder-strap, & pull both straps toward U, it shouldn't move more than a few inches max.

A front-clipped harness discounts the dog's leverage, & also redirects their forward momentum - remember that dogs *push* themselves forward, their rear legs are the engine; the shoulders carry the weight of torso, neck, & head, & do the vast majority of the steering.

EASY DEMO of front-clipped physics:
Simply hold the leash of a dog wearing a chest-clipped harness & let her /him pass U by... stand there, both hands low & arms straight, hands at thighs. Whichever hand is nearest the dog will get most of the load, so be prepared: feet slightly spread, wt in yer butt, knees slightly bent - knees over toes. Stand solid.
The dog will reach the end of the leash, & turn - in an easy arc, toward U. No abrupt yank in another direction, no brute force required; if it's a smooth leather leash on a wet day, U might want to wear gloves to provide extra traction - so that U don't either A, lose yer grip on the wet slick leash, & there goes the dog... or B, get a friction-burn trying to hang onto it. [ Ow.]

A note on leash-handling:
the wrist-loop goes OVER the hand on the 'off' side, where the dog isn't; that hand holds the leash below the loop, plus any extra leash, neatly coiled, or coiled & the coil "folded" in half for carrying.
That wrist-loop is the safety-line, & U are the anchor - if the dog takes off like a Saturn rocket, the near hand [the one on the dog's side] may lose its grip entirely; that off-hand is the back-up device to prevent runaways.
Dog-owners are legally liable for any damage or injury caused by their dogs; if the dog runs into traffic & a multi-car pile-up results as drivers play "dodge the doggy", U may foot the bill for lost time at work, medical care, auto repairs, a street sign, a power pole, & anything or anyone else hit or hurt.
That's aside from any injury to the dog, & vet bills.
Replacing one headlight & repainting that quarter on the front-end can hit a grand; one off-leash escapade can be doggone expensive, so try not to lose the dog. Use the wrist-loop.

When the dog switches sides [or U do], hand the coil to the 'new' off-side hand, slip out of the wrist-loop, hold the coil in the near-hand momentarily, & slide that wrist-loop onto the off-side wrist; then take the coil back in the off hand, & take up the leash with the near-hand, before moving on.
Just in case...

I'll talk about fitting & pre-conditioning the headcollar in the next post.
- terry

leashedForLife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 10:53 AM
  #9
Senior Member
 
Shadowmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Cambridge MA
Posts: 1,277
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
He wears a harness and I clip ip in the front to his chest. We started with a gentle leader which gradually wore out and in my area they don't seem to make that design anymore. The headcollar that's popular here he hates and destroyed in just a couple of weeks. It slips off now and realistically I can't stop him from pawing at it. He seems to like the harness since I never see him chewing it. He escaped from a different padded looser harness that my last dog wore successfully for over a decade. This one is snugger. If I'm in doubt I double clip the leash or chain to his harness and martingale collar for an emergency brake.
He had windpipe damage from pulling too hard being walked too much with a regular collar so I never walk him with just a collar or put any pressure on his throat.
leashedForLife likes this.
Shadowmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 11:47 AM
  #10
Dog Forum ModeraTHOR
 
kmes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 11,909
Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
If it's usually happening when you aren't able to fully pay attention then think about what you can do or change to better manage the situation.

With groceries, perhaps get your guy out and inside first. Then unload groceries. Or if he can't be inside alone at all, unload groceries leaving them beside the car. Close the doors leaving your dog in the car. Get bags inside and then get your dog.
Posted via Mobile Device
AlwaysTomboy likes this.
kmes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Severe Separation Anxiety, Please Help me LosPerros Dog Training and Behavior 2 06-02-2017 02:34 PM
Calming Treats as a Separation Anxiety Training Starter? lgoycoolea Dog Training and Behavior 5 12-30-2016 09:38 AM
Puppy Blues & Separation Anxiety? Please Help :( sorsha Dog Training and Behavior 5 08-28-2016 11:08 AM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.