Harness Help

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Harness Help

This is a discussion on Harness Help within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Which type of harness is good for energetic dogs that escape often to check out the neighborhood? Lexi has had lots of Lupine harnesses, but ...

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Old 10-20-2017, 12:53 PM
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Question Harness Help

Which type of harness is good for energetic dogs that escape often to check out the neighborhood? Lexi has had lots of Lupine harnesses, but she gets out. This might be okay for some dog owners, but Lex isn't a very other-dog-social type. I really want a good, inexpensive harness for her because when she was abused (before we got her), Lexi got a scar on her neck (rope, maybe?) and I don't want to hurt her. Also had something that constricted certain parts of her throat, making it harder to breathe when pulling on her leash....anyone know how to help??
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:16 PM
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How does she typically escape? Does she drop her head and back out? They aren't inexpensive but I love Ruffwear's products. I currently use the Front Range on Forbes my aussie but he really isn't an escapee.
https://www.amazon.com/Ruffwear-No-P...words=ruffwear
A lot of people on here have suggested the Ruffwear Web Master for dogs that like to back out. It has a lot of full body coverage so it's more difficult for the dog to back out of.
https://www.amazon.com/Ruffwear-Refl...words=ruffwear
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:20 PM
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Thank you! Yes, she generally pulls her head out the way you described.
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:26 PM
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How about "Indi-dog Houdini Harness"
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:26 PM
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Ditto the webmaster. I have them for my dogs and really like them. It's the only harness I know of that is pretty much escape proof. That third strap behind the ribcage means most dogs are unable to back out.

I bought one recently for my puppy. Got a good discount and free shipping. So shop atound if you are interested. Depending on size, you might be lucky enough to be able to get a great deal on a harness in one of the discontinued colors.
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:49 PM
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I will try these....thanks everyone for the great advice!
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:52 PM
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Get a carabiner (rock climbing or hardware store weight rated), and a martingale collar fitted tight enough to be escape proof (so she can't back out of it). Put your harness on, put the martingale on, clip the martingale to the harness with the carabiner (you might have add a short rope but a martingale should have enough slack).
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Old 10-20-2017, 08:39 PM
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Question Any home-tailors? Crafters? Leather workers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artdog View Post

Get a carabiner (rock climbing or hardware store, weight rated), and a martingale collar - fit [the collar] tight enough to be escape proof, so she can't back out of it.
Put your harness on, put the martingale on, clip the martingale to the harness with the carabiner - you might have add a short rope but a martingale should have enough slack.


I don't like "slack" in the same sentence as "martingale". Think of it as a knee-jerk.

A properly-fitted martingale sits high on the dog's neck, as close to the jaw-line as U can get it, & lies ____FLAT_____. There is no "loop" standing off the dog's neck, the collar is not slithering down the neck toward the shoulders, it doesn't dangle; it stays in place, & lies smooth, snug to the neck.

If Ur dog has a thick double coat, U may need to thin the coat with thinning shears to leave an area for the collar to lie "in" rather than "on / over" the thick coat.
If Ur dog has a ruff [collie, LH GSD, similar] or a mane, again, U'll need to thin it to let the martingale both lie properly, & WORK properly without pulling hair / trapping hair in the slide painfully.

If U sew:
a short tab of nylon-webbing can be easily made up to connect carabiner & collar on one end to the harness on the other.
Measure the length of webbing needed to bridge the gap from carabiner to harness, wrap an end around the carabiner, & add 3/4 to 1-inch to the end beyond the carabiner; use yer thumbnail to hold the overlap tightly to the underlying webbing.
Add an equal amount to the other end, after running it thru a *spring clip's* flat swivel; again, pin the overlap firmly to the underlayer with a thumbnail to measure accurately.

Before sewing, MELT the edges of the cut webbing - this is best done outdoors, as it produces nasty fumes.
If the weather is truly Godawful, use an externally-piped vent - NOT one that vents >>> into the room! <<<
Turn the vent on & get the fan up to max speed B4 even lighting the match, please.

If U fuse the webbing edge outdoors, check the wind direction & stand on the DOWNWIND side of the house, with all the windows on that side closed.

Hold the webbing flat, & close-enuf to the cut edge that it stays level. Use pliers if U think Ur fingers will be too close to the heat, & WEAR A LEATHER GLOVE to hold the pliers - which may get hot!
Ignite a lighter or match & hold it just beneath the cut edge, moving the flame gently across the cut width, & watch carefully as the thin frizzles melt into a narrow solid band of fused nylon. [If using that indoor vent, hold the webbing HIGH, as close to the vent-opening as U can reach.]
As soon as the frizzles are gone & the melt-line forms a continuous edge, kill the flame immediately. LEAVE THE VENT RUN to continue pulling any fumes out of the house / shop / garage.
After melting both edges, let the webbing cool & harden - lay it on an enameled metal surface or on S/S, preferably.
Don't lay it on wood, plastic, or any finished furniture / painted surface / papered surface. A tacky blob might stick, or heat / fumes might mark the surface.


Once it's cooled, gather unwaxed dental-floss [as sewing-thread], snap, carabiner & long-eye needle, plus 2 large safety-pins.
Lay the webbing down, & secure the carabiner on one end, tightly pinching the short side, on the far side of the carabiner, to the underlying webbing. Pin the 2 layers together with the safety-pin, going in & out & in again B4 latching the pin closed. // Do the same with the spring clip on the other end: run the webbing flat into the swivel, out, lay a 3/4 to 1-inch long 'end' flat on the webbing as overlap, put yer thumb on that short end, thumbnail against the swivel base, hold the 2 layers together tightly, & run the safety-pin in, out, & in again across the width of the webbing. Latch it.

Now, run a double-stitched line ACROSS the webbing just above the safety-pin, tight to the swivel or carabiner, by stitching with same-size gaps that alternate - there's a stitch above with a gap beside it, a gap under that 1st topside stitch with a stitch on the bottom beside that 1st gap, & so on. Each stitch has a gap beside it; each gap is followed by a stitch of the same length.
This double=stitched line is called a "bar tack", & is very strong.

When U reach the edge, take a stitch around that edge, turn the webbing over so U're looking at the former underside, & continue stitching, but now U stitch "in the gaps", going vertically thru the webbing as close to the entry / exit holes of the previous stitches as U can. Using the same holes is ideal.
Get to the other edge, again stitch *around that edge* & turn the webbing over to the 1st side, go down thru a previously-used hole, make an underside stitch, come up in a previously-used hole, etc - go at least FOUR stitches to be sure U have secured it really solidly.
Knot the end, then MELT the knot - delicately - no burning!

Repeat the same bar-stitching on the other end, again directly beside the hardware, with the webbing tightly pinned together. / Double-stitch, add 4 running stitches in alternating topside / underside stitches, knot, melt the knot.

Now: box-stitch that trailing end to solidly tack the 2 layers of webbing for many years of use, & no hardware popping off!

This is a box-stitch diagram: [X]
Stitches go diagonally in a large X - one end of the box is already there, the one tightly beside the swivel or the carabiner.
Make the X, again double-stitching [same length stitches, vertical entry & exit, alternating a stitch on top with one underneath; flip it over, stitch back the other way, taking a stitch across each gap on the top, exit vertically out the bottom, across the next gap, vertically up thru the previously-used hole, across the gap on that side, etc].
At the ENDS of the X, get as close as possible to the edges of the webbing, go over the edge, & up vertically to come out at the tip of the X, wrapping that stitch around BOTH layers of webbing. Then flip the webbing over, & stitch back the way U just came, crossing the gaps & using the previously-used holes.
At the end, knot it & melt the knot.
Repeat the whole process on the other end, box-stitching that overlap securely, knot, melt the knot.

Last, bar-stitch at least 1/8th inch in from the melted cut-edge, again double-stitching for strength & durability. Knot tightly, & melt the knot.
Repeat on the other end, knot it, melt the knot.

U now have a hand-stitched safety-strap that will most-likely outlive at least 4 or 5 dogs' lifespans. Congratulations!
Post a photo of yer finished safety strap - extra points for complementary colors, contrast stitching, etc.

- terry


Last edited by leashedForLife; 10-20-2017 at 08:41 PM.
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Old 10-20-2017, 08:58 PM
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Yeah... If wanting a safety strap for medium and large dogs you can just go buy a lunging strap most places like tractor supply that has horse gear. A basic one is cheaper than the various supplies to make something similar. And time saved.

For small dogs, depending on the harness often you can use a s-biner alone. I have myself clipped them to the leash clip making a leash with 2 clips on the end. One for collar and the other harness. Works particularly well front clip harnesses. Some step ins to. I have a student who just attaches collar and harness with an s-biner on her small dog. Again, cheaper and major time savings.
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Last edited by kmes; 10-20-2017 at 09:02 PM.
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Old 10-20-2017, 09:16 PM
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Talking So what do we do with all that "saved" time? - Binge-watch?



If U're experienced at hand-sewing, that small project takes maybe an a hour, total.

I like making gear - I can make it the color, thickness, width, etc, that i want, use better quality hardware [brass or bronze instead of chromed or nickel-plated steel; S/S; etc], use powder-coated for color...
I've done leather, too. Horse stuff, dog stuff, parrot gear, hawk stuff...

if it's DIY, the sky's the limit, & they last practically forever.
- t

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