Exercising/training a puppy

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Exercising/training a puppy

This is a discussion on Exercising/training a puppy within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Max is 3 1/2 months old now around 35 pounds, tons of energy!! Once he is fully grown and cleared by the Vet he will ...

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Old 02-25-2019, 09:12 AM
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Exercising/training a puppy

Max is 3 1/2 months old now around 35 pounds, tons of energy!! Once he is fully grown and cleared by the Vet he will become my new running buddy. That is a long time in the future however I want to start his training now.

Currently I’ve been taking him on 20-30 min walks around my neighborhood, teaching him the command to “stop”, “sit”, and teaching him to do this at curbs as well, also getting him use to the sights and sounds of the real world. I follow his lead as far as energy but he just seems to love it and wants to go go go. I’ve been doing the same loop around the neighborhood and I feel we can go longer, he doesn’t seem tired. How long do you think it’s ok to go for? I avoid the hills and it’s all just flat, I let him stop to explore if he sees something. I did a little jog for 20 seconds to see how he would react and he was ready to run lol we didn’t but I can tell he will be a great running buddy. Any input on exercise would be great, he is a large breed puppy and I don’t want to do any damage but any energy I can get out would be great plus the training aspect on these walks will be helpful for the future.

Thanks for any advice
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Old 02-25-2019, 10:32 AM
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Just took him on a walk and this time I brought my other dog with us, Wyatt is my current running buddy. Anyway Max was barking at any people he saw walking and at dogs too, he doesn’t seem to do this when we walk just the two of us, I’m wondering if it has something to do with my other dog being there? My other dogs doesn’t react to people at all though. I also went on our walk at an earlier time where there is a lot more people out walking then normal. Not sure what to do, hopefully he grows out of it. He did go up to two random people when they bent down to say hi and seemed to like it. When he barked at the other leosple I would try and get his attention and make him sit, he did it but it didn’t stop the barking. You think over time it should get better? Everything is still pretty new to him. Thanks
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Old 02-27-2019, 12:02 AM
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Dogs are not spiteful. If your puppy is doing something wrong, it probably got the idea it was okay. You have to teach your puppy otherwise.

First, catch him in the act. Dogs can’t connect a punishment to an action hours or even minutes ago. Never hit your puppy. Instead, when you see your puppy doing something wrong, say, ‘No’ in a sharp tone. When your puppy stops, praise him and give him something else to do like ‘Sit’ or ‘Come’. Praise him abundantly for responding.

Remember, puppy training does not have to be harsh. With so many different training methods available, choose one that best suits you and your puppy. If it doesn’t work, just try another one.
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Old 02-28-2019, 05:58 PM
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Copied from Purina site?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanfox177 View Post
Dogs are not spiteful. If your puppy is doing something wrong, it probably got the idea it was okay. You have to teach your puppy otherwise.

First, catch him in the act. Dogs can’t connect a punishment to an action hours or even minutes ago. Never hit your puppy. Instead, when you see your puppy doing something wrong, say, ‘No’ in a sharp tone. When your puppy stops, praise him and give him something else to do like ‘Sit’ or ‘Come’. Praise him abundantly for responding.

Remember, puppy training does not have to be harsh. With so many different training methods available, choose one that best suits you and your puppy. If it doesn’t work, just try another one.
Copy, paste, click.

@bryanfox177, This post of "yours" comes straight from a Purina website, right?
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:34 PM
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How much running can he do? If you want the best for him I think you're going to have to practice patience for another year or so. He looks like a German Shepherd, which is a large breed, and they can continue growing for 18+ months.

Even though he acts indestructible and has high energy, he is still just a very young dog. He's a baby. I would be VERY careful doing anything at all risky for injury or hip dysplasia. His bones and joints are still growing and they will be for at least another year. During that time he shouldn't have extra stress put on his joints.

Instead of thinking about running with him, since it's in his best interest for you to hold off until he's fully grown, you could focus on training and socializing.

When you're not out walking, are you getting your dog out around other dogs and other people? It's very important to get puppies out around lots of people and dogs and different situations. You have to make sure you don't overwhelm your dog though. If you want your puppy to take things in stride as he gets older, then he needs to be out seeing the world as much as he can. A good place to go is to pet stores on the weekend. Also places like Home Depot and Lowes allow dogs. Petco has a free puppy play time class, on Saturdays and Sundays. Its for dogs 6 months and under and they get to go interact with other puppies. It's really good for dogs to be able to interact with other puppies and learn the social skills that they miss out on by no longer being with their litter mates.

Stress on joints can cause hip dysplasia. Hip Dysplasia is genetic, but also environmental.

From article on hip dysplasia:

"In young dogs, avoid feeding a high calorie, high fat, protein diet that leads to rapid bone growth and can cause genetic predispositions of hip dysplasia to manifest. Puppies should be given adequate food to promote slow, steady growth, not rapid growth that can lead to bone and joint problems. Also, excessive exercise and jumping that puts strain on the joints should be avoided in very young dogs."

Your dog is going to be a larger dog, so make sure to feed him large breed puppy food that meets AAFCO standards for nutrition. It's best for large breeds to grow slowly so that they have less stress on their bones and joints. Large breed puppy food (vs normal puppy food) is designed to meet the needs of large breed puppies specifically.

I'm mentioning food, because it's an important part of having a healthy and physically fit dog.

"If your GSP is under 18 months it is best to wait until they are older to run with them. During the first 18 months, a GSP's growth plates are still growing and forming; allowing them to grow without the vigor of long runs may help avoid health issues later in their lives."

https://www.gsp-rescue.org/running-gsp/
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:47 PM
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Thanks for all the info! I know I won’t be able to run with him for a long time. I just wanted to get him used to going on walks, that’s when we encounter people and other dogs for now. I don’t wanna and won’t lush him to do anything or run with him for exercise until he is fully grown and cleared by the vet to do so. Just not sure how much walking is ok. He is on a large breed puppy food and fed three times a day. He gets his last round of vaccines Monday and once he gets those I’ll take him to places like pet stores and Home Depot as you suggested. I’ve only been taking him on walks around the neighborhood since he hasn’t had all his shots I I felt it was safer to expose him to sights and sounds down the streets then in public with other puppies. Right now when he sees people or other dogs he barks and growls but when we approach a dog I know from the neighborhood he will stop once he sniffs them. Same with people so I hope with more exposure he will stop the barking and growling, I try to make everything a good experience for him, hoping to set him up for a good future.
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Old 03-03-2019, 10:19 AM
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Sounds like he's in very good hands. Since you're clearly aware of not wanting to push him too far, I don't think you will.

I think some short (10-15 secs) bursts of full speed running would be fine for your dog..and a lot of fun for him. Slower running for a little longer (down a street block) should be fine too. They do that kind of exercise if they're playing with other dogs.

I started taking my dog to the dog park when she was about 6 months old. She would play and run around for a while, but then get tired and come lay down by me. I took that as a sign that it was time to leave. Or if I noticed her panting heavily. She's older now and lasts longer, but I still watch for signs of heavy panting and then call it quits.

Just in case you don't already know, don't let him run around for at least an hour after eating and/or drinking. Some dogs, like German Shepherds, can get bloat and it can kill them before you have time to get them help. I didn't know about this condition until last summer when my sister's GSD died from bloat.

And since your dog is going to be running regularly it's even more important for you to be aware of it.

Preventing Bloat or GDV in your Dog - Animal Hospital of Fairfield
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Old 03-03-2019, 12:53 PM
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Barking at everything is super common for youngsters of the breed. After owning a few shepherds I can tell you two things- you really really want to obedience train. The other thing is engagement. Start working on it now. Google it. Itll save you a ton of work later down the road. As for the barking, thats super common in youngsters of this breed. As a breed, they tend to be more alert to things in their environment than alot of others. They often have to be taught not to bark at every dang thing. They bark when scared, excited, suspicious or just to hear themselves talk. The growling might be a problem. Some growl when they want to play, which is fine, but if its a nervous type growling thats different. A gsd pup that age should be getting into everything and basically be afraid of almost nothing. Real protection instincts dont generally kick in until closer to 2 years old. Generally anything that you might perceive as being protective ( such as growling ) in a gsd pup under a year or so old is more likely fear or less than ideal nerves. This is all leading back to engagement and training. Engagement is basically being able to hold your dogs attention around distractions. If he's the kind of dog that reacts too much to his environment you need that engagement to be able to control his reactions. Like if he starts barking and growling or whatever and you tell him " look at me " and he does, awaiting further instructions rather than ignoring you in favor of acting fool. This can be a very headstrong breed which is why the engagement and training is so important. And you cant train very well unless you can hold their attention ( engagement )
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Old 03-03-2019, 12:54 PM
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That's interesting!
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Old 03-03-2019, 03:15 PM
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To prevent bloat, how do you keep dogs in dog park settings from drinking from water bowls and then running off to play with each other? Is there some guideline somewhere about how much they eat or drink is dangerous, as in a few treats or sips vs a meal of a cup of food or bowl of water?
Every dog there does this. My dog will get thirsty and go take a water break or eat snow and ice this time of year then see one of his buddies or see a rabbit to chase and take off. I can keep from throwing a ball and encouraging him to play with me. But the whole point of going there is for him to get some exercise. Waiting an hour each time he has some water would mean we'd be there all day. We're already there longer than most people. Or sometimes I'll give him a small treat if he comes back when I call him, not a meal. Or he'll beg a treat from another owner.
It seems cruel to withhold water if he really needs it, but I don't want him to get sick either. If he immediately runs after drinking a lot, he throws up a bit of water so I make him sit with me for a few minutes anyway and encourage him to stay quiet next to me but that only lasts so long if there's a lot of activity.

I've only heard of bloat recently so forgive the stupid questions. Knowing all the info now that I never did before (about many dog health things) it's amazing that my last dog lived to be almost 12 with absolutely no health issues or emergencies other than arthritis and the genetic disease he got at 11)!
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