Dog wont respond to any form of discipline

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Dog wont respond to any form of discipline

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Old 08-05-2018, 08:34 PM
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Dog wont respond to any form of discipline

Hey, I have this 8 month old puppy who just won't seem get the hint on things I don't want her to do. I've tried saying no and putting her in a room for a good minute or two , which she doesn't like. I've also tried taking something away with no real response there. Lastly, I've tried kinda lightly spanking her(which I regret), but she doesn't seem to care there. I don't know any other way to go about this anymore and really need help. Anyone out here have a stubborn puppy like this and have something work?
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:14 PM
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It's a lot easier to teach a dog to DO something than it is to teach them to not do something. You didn't mention what it is she's doing, but try redirecting her onto something more appropriate. If her issue is barking, teach her a quiet command. If she's jumping, teach her to back up or sit.
Also, prevention is a big key. If she's getting into trash or stealing food, put it out of reach. If she's chewing inappropriately, put the items away and provide her with things she can chew. Making sure she gets lots of physical and mental exercise will help a lot too. You could also try to keep her busy with a kong or puzzle toy. Bored pups find trouble!
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:49 AM
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Have you considered a trainer who can teach you how to properly relay what you are wanting to the dog?
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:59 AM
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Yes, I agree with the advice, also you are more likely to get the treatment correct, if you have properly identified the cause of the behaviour. Why is your dog doing these things? Once youve figured that out, youve got a clue as to which method will help rather than hinder.
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:16 PM
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Hi!

Sounds like your pup isn't necessarily or purposely being stubborn as it could seem, but really just doesn't understand quite yet what it is that you want her to be doing. Communication error

Telling her no does not give her any information of what you'd LIKE her to do instead. Try teaching her and then figuring out some quick things that you can ask her to do for you when she is doing a behavior you don't like.

Teach leave it, drop it, lay down, sit, shake, anything with yummy food, praise and fun and you will be able to give her good things to do instead of the no so good stuff.

For example when my 7 month old pup wants to annoy my older blind kitty during feeding time, I have taught her "leave it" which means stop what you are doing and look at me and I will reward you with food and praise. This happened yesterday when kitty's stinky food was very tempting to Puma pup. So I said gently "leave it" and when she looked at me I gave her praise. Then I politely asked her to lay down with us. She did and then I gave her some yummy little chicken bites. Then we fed kitty together. Problem solved. Everyone happy and peaceful.

Or...when Puma runs off (so happily) with one of my stinky socks I go to her and nicely say "mama's sock" and DROP please. It may take a moment to drop at this point, but she does it and then I say thank you and reward her by giving her something "legal' to play with such as one of her many dog safe toys or bones.

Puppies are puppies... and it takes time and patience ---and understanding of why dogs do the things they do to in order to help them grow up to be wonderfully mannered, happy and safe doggies
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:25 PM
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Very good advice from BriscoDog24!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BriscoDog24 View Post
It's a lot easier to teach a dog to DO something than it is to teach them to not do something. You didn't mention what it is she's doing, but try redirecting her onto something more appropriate. If her issue is barking, teach her a quiet command. If she's jumping, teach her to back up or sit.
Also, prevention is a big key. If she's getting into trash or stealing food, put it out of reach. If she's chewing inappropriately, put the items away and provide her with things she can chew. Making sure she gets lots of physical and mental exercise will help a lot too. You could also try to keep her busy with a kong or puzzle toy. Bored pups find trouble!

Yup, I totally agree with BriscoDog24: prevention is super important
. Keep stuff out of reach if it is not for pup. Crate train your pup to looooove their crate with yummy food and safe toys and chewies. NEVER use crate for punishment...ever...even if tempted. It should be their safe relaxation space.

Use baby gates to secure areas where pup is not allowed. Keep your pup near you when out of crate so you can monitor what they are getting into. In other words, prevention will help to keep your dog from having the chance to mess up by doing a "wrong" behavior.
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:51 PM
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Reward all good behavior:)

One of my most important (and successful!!) training philosophies is to reward all good behavior!

The more you reward your dog's GOOD behavior, the less you will see "BAD" (or unwanted) behavior. It really works!


Praise, food, and fun is how I reward. And lots of it! Think of it as earning paychecks

For me, I personally short my dog's two daily meals depending on what we work on that day so they don't get overweight. Then they can EARN lots of healthy treats and food during the day as they learn great behavior.

Some examples:

1)When out walking if my pup looks at me to check in, yup, I reward!

2)Pup lays down on her own when I am talking to someone--Pay!

3)Pup goes to her crate -pay!

4)Pup comes when I call her -Pay!

5)Pup sits after her meal and looks at me rather than staring at kitty as kitty eats -Pay!

6)Pup lets me clip her nails-Pay!

7)Bathtime? Jackpot pay!!! Tons of high value food, massage and gentle calming praise.

8)Sparky allows me to give him med drops in mouth?? (not his favorite thing yet... but getting there. Pay! Cheese and homemade chicken

9)Puma and Sparky take a play break when getting too rowdy.. I call "BREAK!" they instantly stop and plop... Pay!

10) Hyper or nervous dog that can't relax? Practice going places, plop down, relax and pay!!

11) Puma politely sits to meet someone, not jump up to greet. Pay!

12) Gracie lays at my feet at the bank while I do my banking. Pay!

And the list goes on.... until all not-so hot behaviors are replaced by beautiful well mannered behavior! Everyone's happy with this method


Try it---it works!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-10-2018, 12:46 PM
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Excellent post. I’m in the same dilemma.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:13 PM
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Glad you're here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by barongan View Post
Excellent post. Iím in the same dilemma.
Hi! I'm not quite sure when you posted "excellent post" whose post you were referring to.

If you are referring to an individual post it is helpful to quote it or use the person's name so we know who's ideas you are discussing

But anyway, glad you are here!!! I hope we can all help you with your doggie.

My methods that I write about here really work. I use them for all three of my dogs, all who are really different in temperaments, ages, sizes, breeds, issues, bravery, etc.

Please let me know if I can help you at all. I love to help people and their dogs become less stressed, safe and happy in life!
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Old 08-16-2018, 05:28 AM
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Mine is obsessed with play mouthing and does not like baths or cuts. We have lightly smacked her but we learnt this does not work on dogs as they do not learn from it. Even walking away does not work as she will start to mouth me when I play with her more than 15 minutes. However she is selective and does not do that to the hub. I have tried rewarding her with snacks/treats as she gets only 1 cup of meat a day as a meal. Will see how it goes. Unknown breed, not sure of the behaviour.
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