Dog is destroying our yard

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior

Dog is destroying our yard

This is a discussion on Dog is destroying our yard within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; We have a dalmation mix (part terrier??), is about 1.5 yrs old. We have had him for about 3 months. He will not stop digging ...

User Tag List

Like Tree9Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-08-2017, 10:20 AM
  #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Dog is destroying our yard

We have a dalmation mix (part terrier??), is about 1.5 yrs old. We have had him for about 3 months. He will not stop digging holes in our fenced in back yard, and about constantly whines/cries/barks if he is not getting attention. We work full time, and have to keep him in a crate or kennel if we are not home to keep from more damage. He wakes us up at least 2-3 times a night with whining and crying, if let outside just wants us to stay outdoors to play then cries more when we won't play in the middle of the night. He has pulled lattice off the deck, boards off the shed, and pulling apart the kids sandbox. We have tried "No-Dig" spray, natural remedies we found online, etc, with no success. About to the point of re-homing due to these problems. Help/advice??
RockyDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 12:09 PM
  #2
Senior Member
 
AlwaysTomboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: near Reading, PA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Hello and welcome. Congrats on your new pup (even though it sounds like you're frustrated and probably not feeling much joy about him being a member of your family at the moment). The good news is that the behavior problems you mention are totally fixable; the bad news is that the fix isn't necessarily something you can buy.

Your dog is young and sounds like he has a lot of energy and not a lot of training and not a lot of human approved outlets for all of that energy. This, as you're finding, is a bad combo because a bored dog with too much energy will find his own entertainment and outlets for that energy. In this case, it's digging and barking and renovating your deck, shed and sandbox.

The solution is for you and the human members of your household to spend time with him. He needs basic obedience training. He needs lots of exercise. A tired dog is a good dog. Basically, he needs you to teach him what's appropriate and what's not. He can't destroy things in the yard if he's being supervised while he's out there. Depending on how big your yard is, maybe you could designate one area as the doggie digging spot and bury bones or toys there and teach him that digging there is more rewarding than digging elsewhere. If you see him digging elsewhere, redirect him to his digging spot and maybe help him find the buried treasure a few times until he gets the point. Keeping that spot stocked with stuff for him to find will exercise his mind and body to some extent. It'll give him an approved outlet for his desire to dig.

And now I'm thinking of the video of the Dachshund who helps his human with planting by digging holes in the garden for new plants (on command).


'Course if you don't want him digging at all, you can teach him not to dig by stopping him when he starts and redirecting him to a more appropriate activity. If he's playing fetch (or flirt pole or tug of war) with someone, he's probably not going to be digging up the yard. Mental stimulation can be another outlet for his energy in a different way, so training and using brain stimulating toys like balls that dispense food or treats when rolled or interactive puzzles that require scent work to find the food can also help keep him occupied and busy in acceptable ways.

If he's getting enough exercise, you can teach him things like "settle" or "relax" so he'll know that play time is over and now it's quiet time and he'll lie quietly on his bed and chew on a bone or chew toy or stuffed Kong and he can be in the house without bouncing off the walls and breaking things. It's not realistic to expect him to be able to do that if he's overflowing with excess energy and hasn't been taught the necessary skills, though. He may still need to be crated when he's home alone, but if he's sufficiently tired at the end of the day and he learns that waking you up in the middle of the night doesn't get him more play time, he'll learn to sleep through the night.

There's an article here about teaching a dog to settle down. And here's a link to the free training textbook on Ian Dunbar's website because there's so much good info there.

I understand that working full time and raising kids doesn't leave much time for anything else, but a dog isn't born knowing how to behave any more than kids are. Please consider that his previous owner may very well have given him up because of the same behavior problems that are causing you to consider doing the same. If someone doesn't take the time and effort to teach him proper manners and appropriate behavior, his chances of finding a permanent home aren't good. Bouncing around from home to home will only add to his behavior problems, and too many good but untrained dogs are put to sleep every day as it is.

Are there any obedience classes near you where you can get a jump start on teaching him some basics?
Muttelle and leashedForLife like this.
AlwaysTomboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 01:22 PM
  #3
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boston metro-area, USA
Posts: 1,885
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Lightbulb some ideas - brainstorming

Quote:
Originally Posted by RockyDog View Post

We have a Dalmatian mix (part terrier?), ~18-MO, & we've had him for about 3 months.

He won't stop digging holes in our fenced backyard, & near-constantly whines/ cries /barks if he's not getting attention.
We work full time, & [must] crate or kennel him, ...to [prevent] more damage.

He wakes us up at least 2-3 times nightly, whining & crying; if [we take him] outside [at those times, he does not need to pee or poop, he] just wants us to stay outdoors to play -- then he cries more, when we won't play in the middle of the night.
He's pulled lattice off the deck, boards off the shed, & is pulling apart the kids' sandbox.

We've tried "No-Dig" spray, natural remedies we found on-line, etc, with no success.
About to the point of re-homing due to these problems. Help/ advice??

U don't mention where U got him, nor if he's neutered - if he's intact & there are Fs in heat, they can be detected 1 to 5-miles away, depending on terrain & wind direction, & most intact-Ms will be H***-bent on getting to that F, even if they have no idea what the scent means.

Whining by the hour, being off their feed, teeth-chattering, escape attempts, etc, are all classic signs of a M who's desperate to get to an estrous F. // he doesn't *have to be* intact; if he ever mated before he was neutered, he'll still happily escape, mount, & attempt to breed - he has no idea that he's sterile, & doesn't care, in any case.


How much exercise does he get, daily? -- dogs can't be weekend-warriors & lie around M-F, they need at least some aerobic exercise every day.

How old are the kids? - Can they help? Is one at least 12-YO, & preferably a girl?
I say that b/c girls mature faster than boys, or praps we expect more of girls at younger ages than we do boys, but a pre-teen girl could safely take him bike-jogging with a K9-Springer mounted on the bike, & that would get a lot of the ants out of his pants.
The Springer puts the dog under the rider's center of gravity, so the dog can't pull bike & rider over. It attaches to the frame with a wrench, & the dog is clipped to the spring-loaded wand - i Do NOT Use the panic-snap that comes with it, intended to break if the bike falls or the dog suddenly lunges. Instead, i clip a big dog's [80# & over] headcollar to the Springer, or if the dog is 60# or less, they wear a Y-harness & i clip to the chest of the Y-Harness.
Small dogs [30# & under] i use the Y-harness or a 2-inch wide sighthound-style martingale. I don't bike-jog dogs under 20# - their legs are too short, & they tire quickly.

10 to 15-mph is a nice easy pace that dogs can maintain for quite a while; s/he would need to carry water in a sport-cap bottle for the dog, & watch him carefully for signs of overheating. [Ex, a spooning tongue is one such sign that he needs a break, hydration, & to *walk* not collapse, preferably in shade.]


When U are not at home, he can't live in the yard; that's why he's wrecking it, he's bored & solo.
Is he dog-social - he likes to play with other dogs, & gets along well, mostly?
Can U afford dog-daycare 2 or 3X a week, even for a short time, & then cut back on it?

If dog-daycare is too costly, maybe there's a retiree nearby who'd love a dog for company during the day.
U can share custody - they have him during work hours, U have him overnight & weekends. --- ?? Whaddaya think?

an adult who likes to jog might enjoy a Dal-X as a jogging partner. They were developed as coach-dogs, & spent their time running along with the coaches as ppl traveled between towns.
That's where they got their guarding streak - when they arrived at an inn, & the travelers & driver went in to eat, or to spend the night, somebody had to protect the horses, harness, coach, & the luggage during dinner, & the Dal was the guardian.
Once fit, they can easily travel 20-miles or more in a day, & do it again next day. U do need to watch for pad-wear, & they should be kept off the paving as much as possible - the runner is on the asphalt or concrete, the dog runs on grass, sand, dirt, any natural surface.

If the dog's pads start to feel -smooth- to the touch, vs their normal 'sandpaper' texture, he's wearing them down, & may need booties to protect his feet - thin, slick pads are more prone to injury, are heat- & cold-sensitive, can swell painfully, & can blister or be bruised or punctured by sharp gravel.

- terry


Muttelle likes this.
leashedForLife is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 10-08-2017, 08:04 PM
  #4
Senior Member
 
Markie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,485
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
He just sounds extremely bored and in need of some TLC. Maybe try playing with him and letting him out more often. Bored dogs destroy things :-):-) A tired did is a good dog :-) and when your away give him some toys to play with during the day :-):-)
Markie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 07:49 AM
  #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 550
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Agree with all of the above on the dog being bored
If he really enjoys digging, I've heard of people giving the dog a designated area where he is allowed to dig. Kind of like his own sandbox to play in. Just needs a border of some sort to define the area. Teach him its ok to dig there whenever he wants, but the rest of yard off limits.
Never done this myself but seems like a good way to save your yard and at the same time give the dog an outlet for his need to dig if he likes it that much
AlwaysTomboy likes this.
Sthelena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 09:33 AM
  #6
Senior Member
 
Markie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,485
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
My huskies have a corner where they can destroy it and that's it. I just go cover it back up and they go back over there. :-):-) A lot of dog breeds just love digging it's something they do as a hobby fun time :-):-)
Muttelle likes this.
Markie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 10:36 AM
  #7
Senior Member
 
AlwaysTomboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: near Reading, PA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
My dog likes to hide and "bury" her valuables. I don't have a yard, so the best I can do is give her a pile of blankets so she can still go through the motions of "digging" and covering up her stuff.
leashedForLife likes this.
AlwaysTomboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 02:05 PM
  #8
Member
 
Muttelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: BC
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
+1 on the doggy daycare/play dates, if he is well-mannered with other dogs. Three months isn't long, depending whether he was in a shelter environment before he came to you and he's also a 'teenager' in a new (busy?) home. An adolescent dog would likely be testing boundaries whatever their background.
AlwaysTomboy likes this.
Muttelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 10:42 AM
  #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I noticed my dog digs during warmer seasons, so I think he just like to cool himself on the ground and then sleeps. LOL
Lindseynotlindsay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 02:03 PM
  #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 136
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
We have always had huskies, and believe me those dogs can dig their way to china if they were left to their own devices...we do have a designated digging area for the dogs, if they dig in a different area of the yard we fill the hole with dog poop, that definitely deters them from digging outside of the area they are allowed...I do think your dog would benefit from going to doggy daycare at least twice a week so he can get more physical and mental stimulation since you both work, and maybe take him to obedience class, that works wonders!!
Markie likes this.
Olympia is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Diarrhea mystery - new yard hsan Dog Health 4 08-29-2017 12:23 PM
Front Yard Trump Dump pathrunner Dog Stories 4 11-29-2016 04:22 PM
Our Dog Won't Stay In Her Yard Turbolag Dog Training and Behavior 20 05-20-2016 10:43 AM
How to keep wildlife out of yard timber General Dog Discussion 10 10-11-2015 01:06 PM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.