DNA game for "pitbulls"

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior

DNA game for "pitbulls"

This is a discussion on DNA game for "pitbulls" within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Sorry for the pointed questions, but one thing aquarium keeping has taught me, is to have a game plan before getting any pet. Now to ...

User Tag List

Like Tree12Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-03-2018, 06:59 PM
  #1
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
DNA game for "pitbulls"

Sorry for the pointed questions, but one thing aquarium keeping has taught me, is to have a game plan before getting any pet. Now to the post; If I had a coon hound, I would play a game where they track a smell and there would be a reward at the end, because they are scent dogs by DNA; if I had a Chesapeake Bay retriever, I might have items out in a pool or lake and have him retrieve them, because that's in their DNA; if I had a border collie, I would have a game where they herd something for a reward, because that's in their DNA; and so on. When it comes to "pitbulls," they were breed for violence (if I'm wrong on this please let me know,) so what is something safe could I play with them that mimics something their DNA?

SN: If I have something wrong in my post, please correct me, I'm still in my researching phase so any info helps. Thanks in advance
keddre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2018, 08:07 PM
  #2
cos
Senior Member
 
cos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: The beautiful Pacific Northwest!
Posts: 1,022
Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Hello! Welcome to the forum :-)

The name pitbull actually isn't a breed, its more of a blanket term for the way a dog looks. "Pitbull" type dogs are dogs like American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, etc.

I believe you're asking what games you could engage your pitbull type dog in that would mimic something they're bred for and something safe they'd enjoy. Many are descendants of the English bull baiting dog, which were bred for biting and holding onto large animals like bulls and bears. This was outlawed, and people sadly began the sport of dog fighting instead.

I know many pitbull type dogs have succeeded in agility, search and rescue, obedience, and therapy work. Many pits I've met have had an EXTREMELY sweet disposition toward people and can be wonderful therapy dogs. I've seen lots of pitties compete and enjoy agility, and search and rescue is also something cool you could try to get into. You could also look into tracking and trailing, as even if they aren't a hound, they still have a nose, and this is also applied to search and rescue to find people!

I'm glad you're doing your research!
cos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2018, 09:33 PM
  #3
Senior Member
 
Rain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,646
Mentioned: 359 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Are you looking to get a pit mix, or a American Pitbull Terrier?

I've seen Pits doing rally-o, dock diving, barn hunt, agility, weight pull, and just about every other dog sport. With Pits it seems to be what the individual dog loves doing, and with some they are happy doing what their owner is happy that they are doing. Pits are actually good all around dogs.

If you are looking for something that engages their roots, they are terriers, and many have high prey drive so you might look into barn hunt. That's where they search in a "barn" for hidden rats. The "barn" is packed with stacks of hay, the rats are in cages hidden in the hay, and the dog tries to find as many of the rats as possible.
https://barnhunt.com/
You can look up the stats for American Pit Bull Terriers doing barn hunt here https://barnhunt.com/breedstats.html
SpicyBulldog and cos like this.
Rain is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 01-04-2018, 07:39 AM
  #4
Dog Forum ModeraTHOR
 
jclark343's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Florida
Posts: 9,231
Mentioned: 1658 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I think @SpicyBulldog would be a great reference for this question as he is very active in the bully breed community and has dogs that show in different venues that are specific for pitbulls.
cos likes this.
jclark343 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 07:45 AM
  #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rain View Post
Are you looking to get a pit mix, or a American Pitbull Terrier?
I would prefer an American Staff but my shelter calls them "Pit Bull Terrier," so I'm not 100% sure yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rain View Post
If you are looking for something that engages their roots, they are terriers, and many have high prey drive so you might look into barn hunt. That's where they search in a "barn" for hidden rats. The "barn" is packed with stacks of hay, the rats are in cages hidden in the hay, and the dog tries to find as many of the rats as possible.
https://barnhunt.com/
You can look up the stats for American Pit Bull Terriers doing barn hunt here https://barnhunt.com/breedstats.html
Thanks, this is around what I was looking for. I'll look into it

Quote:
Originally Posted by cos View Post
Hello! Welcome to the forum :-)
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by cos View Post
The name pitbull actually isn't a breed, its more of a blanket term for the way a dog looks. "Pitbull" type dogs are dogs like American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, etc.
Haha thanks. I was aware of that which is why I put them in quotes, but my preferred shelter isn't really good at identifying them further than "Pit Bull terrier," so I was just going with the blanket word in my post too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cos View Post
I believe you're asking what games you could engage your pitbull type dog in that would mimic something they're bred for and something safe they'd enjoy. Many are descendants of the English bull baiting dog, which were bred for biting and holding onto large animals like bulls and bears. This was outlawed, and people sadly began the sport of dog fighting instead.

I know many pitbull type dogs have succeeded in agility, search and rescue, obedience, and therapy work. Many pits I've met have had an EXTREMELY sweet disposition toward people and can be wonderful therapy dogs. I've seen lots of pitties compete and enjoy agility, and search and rescue is also something cool you could try to get into. You could also look into tracking and trailing, as even if they aren't a hound, they still have a nose, and this is also applied to search and rescue to find people!

I'm glad you're doing your research!
Thanks and I'll look into SAR as my favorite game to play with my friend's lab is "find it." I'll also look into Therapy training as I planned on getting him/her the good citizen award and therapy is "just" a step up from there. Thanks again
Rain and cos like this.

Last edited by keddre; 01-04-2018 at 07:51 AM.
keddre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 07:54 AM
  #6
Senior Member
 
revolutionrocknroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,800
Mentioned: 161 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
There are a variety of breeds known as pit bulls, so I'm assuming you're specifically referring to the American Pit Bull Terrier?

Pit bulls are really versatile and athletic- good for a variety of dog sports. Descended from terriers and bulldogs, they have a very determined, tenacious temperament. They also tend to have at least some prey drive. You can really do anything with them. There was an old member here who competes in dock diving, lure coursing, and barn hunt with her pit bull. I've also seen weight pull be a very popular sport within the breed.

I read a book called "Wallace" by Jim Gorant about a champion disc dog pit bull.


And I agree SpicyBulldog is a great resource as well.
keddre likes this.
revolutionrocknroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 11:50 AM
  #7
Senior Member
 
busannie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: MD
Posts: 442
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I feel like "violence" is too vague as a descriptor of historical pit bull purpose- given that they were specifically bred for animal combat (bulls, bears, rats/vermin, dogs). Also, while other terrier breeds were mostly only bred for small animal combat (vermin), it's definitely not a trait specific to pit bulls. That said, probably the closest legal equivalent to the breed's original purpose would be hog hunting (dogs bay and catch hog who is dispatched via human with knife- this is a common and successful means of controlling feral hog populations in the southern US), though there are risks associated with the activity, and thus moral implications for an owner who chooses to do so with their dog (dogs can be injured or killed, which many pet owners (me included, I think) will find to be an unacceptable risk); as hogs are not endemic to your area, that pretty much rules it out as an option.

Good, safe options for a pet owner or even serious enthusiast that will sort of mimic the type of behaviors the breed was bred for (catching and holding large animals, predatory behavior toward small animals) would include playing with a springpole, which is a lure/toy suspended from a solid structure which the dog can tug (and sometimes hang, depending on how high the lure is set and where the dog grabs it); and/or flirtpole, which is a lure on a stick which the dog can chase and tug while the owner "runs" it around the dog. The springpole allows the dog to grip and wrestle, and the flirtpole allows the dog to chase, jump, and grip. Other breeds can and will play with toys like this as well if they have high prey drive and gripping behavior, but due to selective breeding for these traits, a high percentage of bull breeds will enjoy them.

Other activities pit bulls tend to enjoy are more along the lines of normal dog activities- running, biking, walking... as they tend to be active, they will enjoy most outdoor activities their owners partake in. Many will enjoy and do well at carting or weight pulling, or agility, as they tend to be both powerful and agile. They tend to be pretty trainable dogs, and do well in a variety of dog sports, IF they are animal tolerant enough to behave in the proximity of other dogs.

That is the main downfall of the breed for an owner who is looking for a "go everywhere, do everything" or "always off leash" dog. Because of their fighting heritage, many have at least some degree of dog/animal aggression or limited tolerance for other dogs challenging them. Dog aggression can be a real pain if you have a dog out in the public often, as others frequently can/do not control their dogs, and any altercation will always be your dog's fault. If you acquire a dog who is not dog aggressive, it is still important to prevent them from being put in a situation where the need or even opportunity to fight arises, as many will "wake up" to their heritage when challenged or forced to defend themselves, and may look forward to the occasion in the future. Pit bulls are not a breed which should be frequenting dog parks and areas where dogs congregate off leash for these reasons (fighting ability, inclination to get involved in a fight, public perception). Some are reliable off leash in a hiking scenario, others may see a wild canid or deer/elk/moose and decide it's a good opportunity to give chase or test their mettle. If you are selective, you may have decent luck finding a dog who could do well for hiking, but plan for avoiding areas frequented by off leash dogs, and the prospect that your dog may not be off leash reliable soon or ever. IME, probably the best candidates for this sort of activity will be dogs who are outwardly indifferent toward other animals and highly magnetic to people.

Given the temperature extremes in your area, I would look for an athletic type dog, and avoid short/squat "Am bully" types with short muzzles and bulky muscle, as these dogs will struggle to breathe in heat. You can "dress" even a short haired dog for reasonable amounts of time in cold, but you can only cool a dog so much in the heat. Avoid dogs who are noisy breathers/panters or appear to get winded quickly, unless there is some sort of treatable medical reason for their issues. Since you work full time and are looking for specific traits in a dog, I would look for a young adult dog (2+) if you are searching in a shelter environment, as it is more likely that traits you see are "set" and less likely to change vs a puppy who still is maturing; also a mature dog should do better with your work schedule, given appropriate exercise.

Make sure your condo has no breed restrictions, as well as any insurance you currently hold on your residence.

Regarding dogs in a shelter environment, despite being labeled as a pit bull or pit bull mix, these dogs may not necessarily display traditional pit bull traits, but keep in mind that they COULD. I consider typical pit bull behavior traits to include: moderate to high prey drive, some degree of animal aggression (whether they are starting conflicts or just not backing down), moderate to high exercise needs, high athleticism (many can easily clear a 6 foot fence,), good bite inhibition toward humans, high confidence/environmental soundness, and human friendly temperament in general (some are rather "soft"/submissive toward humans, but fearful, "shrinking violet" behavior IMO should be considered a fault). With a pit bull of unknown heritage or a pit bull mix, you may see all or none of these traits, but you should be prepared and expect to see some or all of them at some point. It is also possible that a dog in a shelter environment is highly stressed and might act differently in a home environment, so dogs from a foster environment or dogs that you can "foster to adopt" may be more of a sure thing. Amstaffs are an uncommon breed (around 1000 registered by the AKC each year) vs tens of thousands of APBTs and pit bull mixes, so it's more likely that a given dog in the shelter is not an Amstaff. If you DO decide to get an Amstaff from a breeder vs a shelter dog, make sure to select a breeder who is health testing (hips and hearts are an issue with the breed- and APBTs- that will ruin any hope of having an active lifestyle with your dog) and breeding functional dogs, ideally participating in performance events with them.

Volunteering at the shelter is an excellent idea! Not only are you helping the dogs that are currently there, but you are getting a great opportunity to see a variety of dog traits and behaviors; practice training and fulfilling those dogs needs without the commitment of ownership; and determine what sort of dog "clicks" with you. I would encourage you to try to avoid falling in love with a dog when you first begin volunteering there, as in time you will see many dogs and find that you have a certain "type" which you prefer, and which may be most likely to work out for you long term (I'm much more selective about what type of dog I would own having worked with dogs for years). Maybe see if they allow fostering, and take a few (one at a time!) to give them time out of the shelter and you time with a dog in your home. I'm sure they would love to go hiking and spend time outdoors
busannie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 03:15 PM
  #8
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Lol thanks, this is quite the write up, where to start.
Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
I feel like "violence" is too vague as a descriptor of historical pit bull purpose- given that they were specifically bred for animal combat (bulls, bears, rats/vermin, dogs). Also, while other terrier breeds were mostly only bred for small animal combat (vermin), it's definitely not a trait specific to pit bulls. That said, probably the closest legal equivalent to the breed's original purpose would be hog hunting (dogs bay and catch hog who is dispatched via human with knife- this is a common and successful means of controlling feral hog populations in the southern US), though there are risks associated with the activity, and thus moral implications for an owner who chooses to do so with their dog (dogs can be injured or killed, which many pet owners (me included, I think) will find to be an unacceptable risk); as hogs are not endemic to your area, that pretty much rules it out as an option.
Iím sorry but I donít see this one happening as I donít have the stomach to kill or harm anything, Iím already on the fence about barn hunt; maybe I could do it at home with powerfull smelling treats.

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
Good, safe options for a pet owner or even serious enthusiast that will sort of mimic the type of behaviors the breed was bred for (catching and holding large animals, predatory behavior toward small animals) would include playing with a springpole, which is a lure/toy suspended from a solid structure which the dog can tug (and sometimes hang, depending on how high the lure is set and where the dog grabs it); and/or flirtpole, which is a lure on a stick which the dog can chase and tug while the owner "runs" it around the dog. The springpole allows the dog to grip and wrestle, and the flirtpole allows the dog to chase, jump, and grip. Other breeds can and will play with toys like this as well if they have high prey drive and gripping behavior, but due to selective breeding for these traits, a high percentage of bull breeds will enjoy them.
Iíll look into this. Iím curious on how this affects aggression, but I imagine that (when practiced safely) it shouldnít make that big of a difference in the dogís temperament.

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
Other activities pit bulls tend to enjoy are more along the lines of normal dog activities- running, biking, walking... as they tend to be active, they will enjoy most outdoor activities their owners partake in.
Fits right in with my weekends, nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
Many will enjoy and do well at carting or weight pulling, or agility, as they tend to be both powerful and agile. They tend to be pretty trainable dogs, and do well in a variety of dog sports, IF they are animal tolerant enough to behave in the proximity of other dogs.
I was looking at agility too, I feel it could be a nice bonding activity and a great training tool too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
That is the main downfall of the breed for an owner who is looking for a "go everywhere, do everything" or "always off leash" dog. Because of their fighting heritage, many have at least some degree of dog/animal aggression or limited tolerance for other dogs challenging them. Dog aggression can be a real pain if you have a dog out in the public often, as others frequently can/do not control their dogs, and any altercation will always be your dog's fault. If you acquire a dog who is not dog aggressive, it is still important to prevent them from being put in a situation where the need or even opportunity to fight arises, as many will "wake up" to their heritage when challenged or forced to defend themselves, and may look forward to the occasion in the future. Pit bulls are not a breed which should be frequenting dog parks and areas where dogs congregate off leash for these reasons (fighting ability, inclination to get involved in a fight, public perception). Some are reliable off leash in a hiking scenario, others may see a wild canid or deer/elk/moose and decide it's a good opportunity to give chase or test their mettle. If you are selective, you may have decent luck finding a dog who could do well for hiking, but plan for avoiding areas frequented by off leash dogs, and the prospect that your dog may not be off leash reliable soon or ever. IME, probably the best candidates for this sort of activity will be dogs who are outwardly indifferent toward other animals and highly magnetic to people.
I have given up on off-leash, but will still try the training anyway. I dropped SPCA out my search and switched to AAF or Adopt-a-pit where they try their best to socialize and get the dogís basic training before adoption; AAF also offers a ďtrialĒ adoption, where I can take the dog home for seven days and decide if sheís a good fit for my home. That said, I understand the ďaggressiveĒ gene is still laying dormant and can arise at any time; thanks for the warning :thumbs up:

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
Given the temperature extremes in your area, I would look for an athletic type dog, and avoid short/squat "Am bully" types with short muzzles and bulky muscle, as these dogs will struggle to breathe in heat. You can "dress" even a short haired dog for reasonable amounts of time in cold, but you can only cool a dog so much in the heat. Avoid dogs who are noisy breathers/panters or appear to get winded quickly, unless there is some sort of treatable medical reason for their issues. Since you work full time and are looking for specific traits in a dog, I would look for a young adult dog (2+) if you are searching in a shelter environment, as it is more likely that traits you see are "set" and less likely to change vs a puppy who still is maturing; also a mature dog should do better with your work schedule, given appropriate exercise.

Make sure your condo has no breed restrictions, as well as any insurance you currently hold on your residence.
Thanks for the insurance warning; also, thanks for the age warning too. I didnít think about the fact that their traits could change as they age, but itís completely reasonable and something that I would have missed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
Regarding dogs in a shelter environment, despite being labeled as a pit bull or pit bull mix, these dogs may not necessarily display traditional pit bull traits, but keep in mind that they COULD. I consider typical pit bull behavior traits to include: moderate to high prey drive, some degree of animal aggression (whether they are starting conflicts or just not backing down), moderate to high exercise needs, high athleticism (many can easily clear a 6 foot fence,), good bite inhibition toward humans, high confidence/environmental soundness, and human friendly temperament in general (some are rather "soft"/submissive toward humans, but fearful, "shrinking violet" behavior IMO should be considered a fault). With a pit bull of unknown heritage or a pit bull mix, you may see all or none of these traits, but you should be prepared and expect to see some or all of them at some point. It is also possible that a dog in a shelter environment is highly stressed and might act differently in a home environment, so dogs from a foster environment or dogs that you can "foster to adopt" may be more of a sure thing. Amstaffs are an uncommon breed (around 1000 registered by the AKC each year) vs tens of thousands of APBTs and pit bull mixes, so it's more likely that a given dog in the shelter is not an Amstaff. If you DO decide to get an Amstaff from a breeder vs a shelter dog, make sure to select a breeder who is health testing (hips and hearts are an issue with the breed- and APBTs- that will ruin any hope of having an active lifestyle with your dog) and breeding functional dogs, ideally participating in performance events with them.

Volunteering at the shelter is an excellent idea! Not only are you helping the dogs that are currently there, but you are getting a great opportunity to see a variety of dog traits and behaviors; practice training and fulfilling those dogs needs without the commitment of ownership; and determine what sort of dog "clicks" with you. I would encourage you to try to avoid falling in love with a dog when you first begin volunteering there, as in time you will see many dogs and find that you have a certain "type" which you prefer, and which may be most likely to work out for you long term (I'm much more selective about what type of dog I would own having worked with dogs for years). Maybe see if they allow fostering, and take a few (one at a time!) to give them time out of the shelter and you time with a dog in your home. I'm sure they would love to go hiking and spend time outdoors
I didnít know that Am Staffs were rare, thatís nice to know. Everything is noted, thanks for the heads up and Iíll try the fostering for a while too, thatís a good idea.
keddre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 04:26 PM
  #9
Senior Member
 
Rain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,646
Mentioned: 359 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by keddre View Post
Lol thanks, this is quite the write up, where to start.

I’m sorry but I don’t see this one happening as I don’t have the stomach to kill or harm anything, I’m already on the fence about barn hunt; maybe I could do it at home with powerfull smelling treats.


I’ll look into this. I’m curious on how this affects aggression, but I imagine that (when practiced safely) it shouldn’t make that big of a difference in the dog’s temperament.


Fits right in with my weekends, nice.


I was looking at agility too, I feel it could be a nice bonding activity and a great training tool too.


I have given up on off-leash, but will still try the training anyway. I dropped SPCA out my search and switched to AAF or Adopt-a-pit where they try their best to socialize and get the dog’s basic training before adoption; AAF also offers a “trial” adoption, where I can take the dog home for seven days and decide if she’s a good fit for my home. That said, I understand the “aggressive” gene is still laying dormant and can arise at any time; thanks for the warning :thumbs up:


Thanks for the insurance warning; also, thanks for the age warning too. I didn’t think about the fact that their traits could change as they age, but it’s completely reasonable and something that I would have missed.


I didn’t know that Am Staffs were rare, that’s nice to know. Everything is noted, thanks for the heads up and I’ll try the fostering for a while too, that’s a good idea.
From what I know about Barn Hunt the rats or never in any danger, or distress. The rats are pet rats and the dogs are not allowed to attack cages and frighten the rats. I think of it along the lines of a herding dog herding sheep, they are never supposed to frighten or harm the sheep, in Barn Hunt the object is to locate the rat but not attack the rat.

keddre likes this.

Last edited by Rain; 01-04-2018 at 04:29 PM.
Rain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 04:45 PM
  #10
Senior Member
 
Moonstream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 659
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
First, I do think it's important to clarify that the vast majority of breeds are no longer being selectively bred to fill their original working role. I know plenty of Labs and Goldens that have 0 natural retrieve drive- they'll chase the ball but lose interest the moment they get to it and have 0 affinity for water. Collies (rough and smooth as in Lassie Collie) and most Corgis these days have very little natural herding drive. Plenty of German Shepherd dogs would be unsafe around livestock or lack natural defensive drives and think everyone is their friend.

This to say: what the breed was "originally" bred for shouldn't be the primary factor in considering dog sports/activities to pursue. If you do have a specific sport in mind, then sure, choose breeds that fit that use well, and look for the specific lines in those breeds still bred to do those things. I know a lot of people who use field bred labs in dock diving, the working shepherds dominate the bite sports (not technically their original use, but a long standing one), and working BCs/Cattle Dogs/Kelpies are going to be better at high level herding than a show line Corgi.

I'm not super plugged in to most of the bully-breed breeding world, and most of what I do know is from the American Pitbull Terrier side of things (which doesn't sound to be the breed you're looking at). Most of what I see in terms of competition/sport seems to be Weight Pull and wall jumps (not sure of the technical term, but involves dogs scaling very high vertical walls to grab a lure). I've seen some involved in bite sports, though not always in a responsible way with good helpers.

I have also seen + know of bully-breeds doing well in a variety of other sports such as agility, flyball, dock diving, disk dog (competitive frisbee), lure coursing, and nosework. I agree Barn Hunt would be a good sport for most, since prey drive is pretty common.

I do know of several sport mixes (mainly bred for/by the flyball community) that use American Staffordshire or Staffordshire terriers in various crosses/lines. I have especially seen a lot of Staffy/Whippet and Border Collie/Staffy crosses.

Finally: you mentioned a shelter. If you're getting this dog from a shelter, keep in mind that any breed guess is just that: a guess. And not a very reliable one, at that. Judge what the dog in front of you likes to do and is capable of.
keddre likes this.
Moonstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pit Bulls and Dog Aggression / Game TWadeJ General Dog Discussion 4 12-30-2016 11:18 PM
Trying to wrap my head around +R or positive reinforcement "curing" dogs. jagger Dog Training and Behavior 166 05-06-2016 03:31 PM
GAME: Have you ever? KatieToth General Dog Discussion 3 11-15-2015 05:39 AM
Breed game! cos General Dog Discussion 2 10-16-2015 01:50 PM
What is this tennis ball game? SarahAlexandra General Dog Discussion 0 10-01-2015 02:35 PM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.