Deaf dog - Problems - Clingy and anxious - Pls Help

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Deaf dog - Problems - Clingy and anxious - Pls Help

This is a discussion on Deaf dog - Problems - Clingy and anxious - Pls Help within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Does anyone have any experience with deaf dogs? We have recently rescued a 12-15 yr old staffy called Duckie. Shes had it rough as we ...

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Old 04-05-2019, 10:33 AM
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Deaf dog - Problems - Clingy and anxious - Pls Help

Does anyone have any experience with deaf dogs?

We have recently rescued a 12-15 yr old staffy called Duckie. Shes had it rough as we are working on getting her back to good health. She has about 10% hearing (sometimes she can hear a very loud clap).

She is excellent on the lead and off lead, with dogs and people. However, she is extremely clingy. As much as it is great to have her focus on me, since were teaching hand signals, i cannot walk or move without her getting up and crowding me around the house. She is also very, very eager for food. To the point it is difficult to calm her. She doesnt know wait or stop, were trying to teach her that but it is difficult. We are also stuck on how to teach her to signal us when she wants to go out to the toilet. So far ive tried and failed to see the trigger as she fusses all the time in the same manne.

We would really like some help with these problems. I think it has a lot to do with anxiety and her deafness. She was previously caged for 12-14 hours a day and poorly fed or exercised - You can see its had an impact.

Thank you
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Old 04-05-2019, 01:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckiesDad View Post
Does anyone have any experience with deaf dogs?

We have recently rescued a 12-15 yr old staffy called Duckie. Shes had it rough as we are working on getting her back to good health. She has about 10% hearing (sometimes she can hear a very loud clap).

She is excellent on the lead and off lead, with dogs and people. However, she is extremely clingy. As much as it is great to have her focus on me, since were teaching hand signals, i cannot walk or move without her getting up and crowding me around the house. She is also very, very eager for food. To the point it is difficult to calm her. She doesnt know wait or stop, were trying to teach her that but it is difficult. We are also stuck on how to teach her to signal us when she wants to go out to the toilet. So far ive tried and failed to see the trigger as she fusses all the time in the same manne.

We would really like some help with these problems. I think it has a lot to do with anxiety and her deafness. She was previously caged for 12-14 hours a day and poorly fed or exercised - You can see its had an impact.

Thank you
Hi

Congrats on your new addition, she looks lovely.

We also rescued a deaf dog when he was around 12 or 13. That's him in my avatar. He was terribly anxious when we went out, even though he had other dogs for company. Fortunately we are both retired and never had to leave him for more than an hour or two, but he never got over that separation anxiety in the 10 years we had him. He was also very clingy at first and followed me everywhere. He gradually gained confidence, but it took about 3 years. I never really tried to train him, just let him go his own way, he seemed to learn how to behave from the other dogs.

I can't help on training her to tell you when she needs to go out. I got over that one by just leaving the door open as much as possible and he eventually learned to stand by the door if it was closed. But maybe that's not possible if you don't have a fenced garden. Anyway good luck with her, you sound as though you have the patience to make it work - I think that's all it takes really, patience and time

Lynsey
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Old 04-05-2019, 09:18 PM
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Teach FUN impulse control games for your deaf dog

Awww Duckie looks so sweet and precious. Congrats on adopting her and thank you for taking in a senior doggie with special needs. You must have a big heart, just like this sweet pup!

As far as potty training, you could teach her to ring a chime or bell to let you know she needs to go out. I trained my Puma pup in less than 2 days to ring a big ole chime that hangs at her level inside by my back door. She also is so funny---in my shop we have a small flocked horse figurine in a similar position by the door. She now noses that to go out...I never even taught her that!

So I first taught Puma "touch" where she is asked to put her nose to my hand for treats and praise. Then I branched out to asking her to "touch" other items. You could totally do this with a deaf dog, since touch is done basically by scent. (some folks call it targeting)

Anyway, then I hung the chime, asked her to touch it, and then as soon as she did, I immediately opened the door for her to go out! Worked like a charm!

I don't think your dog would have to hear the chime, per se, rather she would just feel it and after you reward the action, and open your door, she would probably understand the concept. Practice til she catches on. Add treats if needed to reinforce what you want.

I was surprised how fast Puma caught on. Maybe you will have great success too!

As for teaching wait or impulse control ---it is a great thing that she loves food!

Food motivated dogs are so fun to work with! Makes it so much easier.

I began teaching Puma pup at a very early age things like leave it, drop it, wait, sit before eating, etc. We work in a shopping center and there is all kinds of disgusting things in our parking lot on the ground. Like cigarette butts and chicken bones and gross food and alcohol bottles etc. Nice, huh??

Puma initially was a parking lot scavenger when we were out on our walks in our shopping center. EEEEW. Dangerous. Creepy.

So I made it high priority to teach her all those things to keep her safe.

How? I made fun games of it all!! I would sit with her and play impulse control games with food. Like leave it. I would show her the item, say leave it, then when she would look away or back away, even for just one second, I would pay her heavily for her good choice. So basically, no not that, but if you leave it, you get all this good stuff!! I always made it fun and rewarding. When she didn't wait or leave it, no punishments or corrections...she just didn't get the rewards that round. Then we try again until she gets it right.

I think you could try these types of impulse control games with Duckie and have good results. Just be creative and consistent.

And use lots of yummy treats and generous praise to teach her what you'd like her to do

Dogs actually watch us, our facial expressions, and our body language more than they listen to our voices.


Which is why so many people fail at dog training....the person is telling their dog one thing with their voice, but the person's body language and facial expressions are sending different messages! Dog gets all confused and has no idea what we want from them when this happens!
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Last edited by AthenaLove; 04-05-2019 at 09:21 PM.
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Old 04-05-2019, 10:02 PM
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Teaching Impulse Control: How Puma and I play the "Leave It!" game

One of the impulse games we play may really help you guys on many levels. And it should work just fine on a deaf or hearing impaired dog. Especially since she is food motivated!

Here's how we play the "Leave It!" game:

So I generally ask Puma to focus on me, then sit or lay down. (All things you can do with hand signs, right?) Then I put down a treat. I ask her to leave it. (you could put up your hand in a stop position for example)

When she looks away, she gets a different treat. Rinse repeat. Over and over again. If your dog tries to go for the treat (normal) then simply cover it with your hand. When she backs away from it, or looks away even for a second, then instantly PAY! (Give her yummy treats and praise).

After Puma mastered the initial leave it game with one treat on the ground...we advanced to other more challenging versions of it! FUN!

So, we did one treat, then put two or three treats and I asked for a leave it. Increase the quantity in front of the dog.

I would vary it-- like put treats on my body (legs bc we were sitting.) This also works wonders to acclimate nervous or shy dogs to getting physically closer to people!!

Then we progressed to me arcing Puma pup's body with treats all around her. Same game. Leave it! Sometimes she got those treats and sometimes we left those in place and she got other treats from me.

Then I would place the many treats down around her and ask her for one trick.
Like a shake. Or a "say meow" (bark) or a high five. All while the treats remained untouched by her. Once she did the trick, she got all the treats on the ground.

Then I upped it to arcing her body and she now had to do a succession of tricks all while ignoring or leaving the treats alone! When she completed the whole shabang she got the goodies and high prasie.

And then..... all while I was teaching this, I taught her "Where's leave it??"
She will now look at the item and look back at me. Super cute. People are so charmed by it. We did it in a store the other day when we were on the doggie toy aisle. She grabbed a plush toy that she really wanted. I said Puma, drop it please. She did. Then I said leave it. Then I asked her "where's leave it?" She looked at the toy, then looked back at me, and made a fun happy sound. All in front of people. She got major bonus food for that!!!

I even taught this fun game to my client's tiny four month old Chihuahua! He looooves to play "Leave it!" with me.

SO fun...this game is excellent for teaching a myriad of great things like impulse control, wait, patience, manners, safety to not pick up gross things on ground later, etc. Really pays off for the dog and the owner!!!!
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Last edited by AthenaLove; 04-05-2019 at 10:06 PM.
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Old 04-05-2019, 10:22 PM
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Use daily massage for anxious dogs

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckiesDad View Post
. However, she is extremely clingy.
As much as it is great to have her focus on me, since were teaching hand signals, i cannot walk or move without her getting up and crowding me around the house.
I think it has a lot to do with anxiety and her deafness.

If you feel like she has a lot of anxiety, you could give Miss Duckie some nice quiet relaxing massages.


I give my shy cautious Gracie dog lots of massage. Look up T-touch and either hire a pro, or create your own version! I do this virtually every night (and some mornings) with my Gracie. You can put on relaxing music if you like. I just usually do it on our bed while I watch TV and massage her at the same time. She loves it. Heck, usually my lil Sparky dog bellies up to the bar, too, and then I am massaging two doggies

Very, very good for increasing your bond and trust with her.
It can be your special quiet time together. I am betting if you do this daily, even 15 minutes of it, you will see enormous changes in Duckie's overall beahvior, esp with the clingness. Plus---bonus--- it will relax you, too!

Massage is fabulous for fearful dogs, nervous dogs, over stressed dogs, hyper dogs, old dogs and especially puppies to teach relax.
And to increase trust and enhance bonding between the dog and the owner.

Try it, massage has made a huge difference with my Gracie dog.
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Old 04-14-2019, 09:53 AM
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Does Duckie take treats nicely from your hands? You could try feeding her by hand instead of letting her eat from the bowl, just for a few weeks.
This has helped our pup to slow down and actually chew the kibble, whereas before he was just scarfing down his food. It also helped form a bond/trust between us and our little guy.
Another thing you could try with Duckie is a snuffle mat. Eating becomes more of a game, trying to find the kibble in the mat.
I would also recommend to measure out the food for the day, and reserve some to feed in between. A good way to do this is to get yourself a few Kongs and wet small portions of food, fill them in the Kong and then freeze them. When you are going to be busy doing things in the house, where you want to keep Duckie away from your feet, offer her the Kong, and she might happily occupy her time with the Kong while you do your chores. Food puzzles will work too, if she is not a destructive dog.
A baby gate can help keep her on the other side securely away from you while she is busy with the Kong. In the beginning I would just keep your time away from her short, and join her again while she is still eating. In time she will learn that she is fine by herself while you do your thing.
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