Crazy gsp

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Crazy gsp

This is a discussion on Crazy gsp within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; We grabbed up an adorable gsp pup last August. He is about 8 months old now and has recently started going psycho. I wrestle with ...

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Old 03-08-2019, 09:53 PM
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Crazy gsp

We grabbed up an adorable gsp pup last August. He is about 8 months old now and has recently started going psycho. I wrestle with him, train him, the girls run around with him, he eats well, has lots of toys...but he has started being very destructive all of a sudden. He is digging all over the place, tearing pieces of the trampoline padding, jumping up to the table and snatching food, running with the kids toys even when we tell him no several times, chewing spray paint cans, dragging the hose around...pretty much going to town on everything BUT his toys (unless we are directly using them with him for play or training). He was sitting well, healing, staying away from the dinner table, not scratching heavily on the back door...he was progressing very well. Now he quickly runs back to what we were just getting onto him about. What could his deal be if he gets play time, good food, and lots of play room and love??? Is he rebelling? We we're already about to have him neutered, will that help his wildness any? He just seems way out of wack. We had to give up our last dog (a beautiful grey Chesapeake Bay) because she was getting very mouthy with our two year old and actually bit hard. She was a shelter girl from an "unknown" previous family situation. I do not want to have to do the same with our new one if he continues to destroy everything in his path. I was walking him the other day and the genius went wild momentarily, grabbed his leash while running, and ended up yanking a tooth out. I just can't believe some things that say a lot of this is normal. He is a basket case, but we love him. Please help.
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Old 03-11-2019, 12:24 AM
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Could be aggression due to frustration?

Aggression that's caused by frustration is often referred to as redirected aggression or barrier frustration. It occurs when a dog is frustrated at not being able to get to something and takes its frustration out in another way. This type of aggression is often seen in dogs that spend a lot of time tied up, restrained on a leash, or behind a chain-link fence.

For example, a dog that's chained in a yard may spend the day straining to get to a dog that lives across the street or in an adjacent yard. The restrained dog usually barks and growls more fiercely as the frustration grows. When the owner approaches, the dog may redirect its frustration and bite the owner.
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Old 03-13-2019, 04:06 PM
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I don't see this as aggressive behavior

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Originally Posted by bryanfox177 View Post
Could be aggression due to frustration?

Aggression that's caused by frustration is often referred to as redirected aggression or barrier frustration.
bryanfox177, I didn't see anywhere in the OP's post about aggressive behavior. I worry about people labeling behavior as aggressive if it is not aggressive.

Why do you think this is about aggression? I am confused. Were you responding to someone else's post accidentally here?

bryanfox177, Can you clarify? Thx
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Old 03-13-2019, 04:22 PM
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Your dog may be going though adolescent stage--crazy teenager!!

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Originally Posted by gmlloyd87 View Post
We grabbed up an adorable gsp pup last August. He is about 8 months old now and has recently started going psycho. .
Ahhhh your dog is most likely going through his adolescent stage or teenage stage. Good luck! Hold on for the crazy ride!

Here is a really good short online article that may help you understand your pup's new crazy behavior!!

Your Adolescent Puppy and Changes to Expect

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/he...puppy-changes/

Excerpts/Highlights:

The most challenging time of raising a puppy is the adolescent period. Dogs become “teenagers” and seem to forget everything they have ever been taught. This period is individual to each dog, but it may begin when he’s about eight months old and continue until he’s two years old.

Adolescence does not begin and end overnight. However, some noticeable changes include becoming larger and stronger, as well as exhibiting “stubborn” behavior and a desire to begin exploring outside a previous comfort zone.


One common mistake is giving your puppy too much freedom too soon. Young puppies have an innate desire to be near you, and this gives owners a false sense of security. As your puppy gets older and more confident, he will likely no longer stay close by, and it may feel like any prior training has disappeared!

Positive reinforcement is essential, so make sure you reward your pup with appropriate treats when he succeeds.

Self-Control
Start teaching your puppy to exercise self-control. Teaching “leave it” and “drop it” are great ways for dogs to learn self-control, and this transfers into other areas of your dog’s life.

REWARD YOUR DOG!

Use whatever your dog likes best to reward him or her for making good choices, especially if he makes a good choice without being prompted. Maybe your puppy sits to ask for attention — don’t take that for granted! Reward your puppy for making good decisions like this, and he will continue to make those good decisions.

Puppy Chewing and Teething

Keep those puppy-safe chew toys handy during adolescence. You may think that teething ended when the adult teeth came in at around 6 months. But there is a secondary chewing phase between 8-to-10 months that occurs as the adult teeth settle in the jaw. Continue to puppy-proof your house, keep an eye on your adolescent, and keep enticing chew
toys in easy reach of him.

MENTAL STIMULATION

Mental stimulation is important for dogs and puppies of any age, but it’s particularly important for adolescent dogs with a lot of energy. Help keep your teen dog from getting into trouble by providing plenty of mental stimulation. Activities like fetch, walks, games, obedience and trick training, puzzle toys, food-dispensing toys, and group classes are great ways to keep your dog’s mind active. A tired dog is a good dog, but a mentally tired dog is a great dog!
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